Port of Tacoma Settles Environmental Violations

MarineLink.com
Wednesday, August 07, 2013

The Port of Tacoma and two contractors have agreed to pay a $500,000 penalty and restore wetland habitat at an estimated cost of over $3 million to compensate for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act that damaged valuable Puget Sound wetlands, according to a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice. The proposed settlement has been filed with the court and the public will have 30 days to provide comments, which the court will consider before the settlement is approved.

In 2008, EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers discovered that the Port of Tacoma hired a contractor to raze vegetation and destroyed more than four acres of wetlands in Hylebos Marsh, an area that provided important wildlife habitat and enhanced Puget Sound water quality. The contractor performed the work at the direction of the Port of Tacoma, which had been working to eradicate vineyard snails from Hylebos Marsh with guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. An order from USDA stated that plowing and grading to deal with the invasive snail species was acceptable in non-wetland areas only.

At the time EPA and the Army Corps discovered the destroyed wetlands at Hylebos Marsh, the Port also disclosed that in 2006 it directed a contractor to dump over 4,000 cubic yards of urban fill materials—including soil, concrete and asphalt pieces—into nearly two acres of wetlands in an area called EB-1B, located east of Hylebos Marsh.

The Clean Water Act prohibits discharge of pollutants to the waters of the United States, including certain wetlands, except as authorized by a permit. The Port of Tacoma did not have required Clean Water Act permits to conduct work in the wetlands.

"We can’t afford to lose Puget Sound wetlands, especially where they are so scarce. Wetlands provide important water quality protection for Puget Sound and valuable habitat for fish and resident birds," said Dennis McLerran, Regional Administrator for EPA Region 10. "The permitting process exists to allow responsible development that also protects the environment."

Wetland and stream ecosystems play a critical role in Puget Sound water quality by breaking down and processing pollution flowing from upland areas. In addition, wetlands help prevent flooding in communities near Puget Sound and provide important habitat for fish and wildlife species, including endangered salmon species, migratory and resident birds, and small mammals.

Wetlands are particularly important in urban landscapes because they trap, store, and slowly release surface water runoff, precipitation, groundwater, and flood water. In doing so, they filter polluted runoff from pavement and buildings before it reaches waterways.

The wetlands impacted by the unpermitted activity were located adjacent to Commencement Bay, a waterway that has undergone a major EPA Superfund cleanup and an area that has lost most of its historic streams and wetlands.

The Port of Tacoma has agreed to spend an estimated $3 million on restoration projects. This work will restore wetlands on nearly ten acres of Port property, including stream ecosystem restoration and enhancements on nearby Upper Clear Creek where the Port will restore or improve a total of 28 acres of wetlands as part of a larger project. The restoration will protect Puget Sound water quality by restoring wetland functions, including breakdown and storage of harmful levels of nutrients and contaminants, and soil stabilization. The work will also restore habitat for birds, small mammals and fish. The first restoration project is scheduled to begin in August 2013.

The contractors associated with the settlement are Scarsella Brothers, Inc. and WAKA Group, Inc.

epa.gov
 

Maritime Reporter September 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Ports

Great Lakes Coal up More Than 12% in September

Lake Carriers’ Association reported that coal shipments on the Great Lakes totaled 3 million tons in September, an increase of more than 12 percent compared to a year ago.

Containers, Cruises Help Boost Marseilles Fos

Container throughput at French port Marseilles Fos reached 876,711 teu for the period January to September, an increase of 6% on the first nine months last year.

Port of Long Beach Announces Executive Appointments

The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners recently filled key Harbor Department executive posts with staff veterans as the Department continues to undergo a

Environmental

IBIA Welcomes MEPC Bunker Compromise

The compromise solution on the issue of ensuring bunker quality agreed at the 67th meeting of the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 67) has been

Interferry Applauds IMO Consideration of BWTS Exemption

Interferry has praised a decision made at last week’s meeting of the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) that could exempt certain ferry operators

MEPC Makes Progress on Energy Efficiency, Emissions

The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) met for its 67th session from October 13-17, 2014, at IMO Headquarters in London.

News

New York, London Juxtaposed by New Maritime Event

On November 13, the newly formed New York Maritime Consortium, a coalition of leaders from New York Maritime Inc. (NYMAR), the Society of Maritime Arbitrators (SMA),

Transas to Supply TechSim Solutions to SUNY Maritime

The Navsim Services and Transas Americas Team, have been awarded contracts for supply of a combination of full mission, classroom and cloud based Transas Technical

FMT Options for another Towboat from Eastern

Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. announce that Florida Marine Transporters, Inc. of Mandeville, La. exercised another additional 90’x32’x10’ “Canal Class” Inland

Government Update

US Warns of Sanctions on Buyers of Islamic State Oil

The Obama administration on Thursday threatened to slap sanctions on anyone buying oil from Islamic State militants in an effort to disrupt what it said was a $1-million-a-day funding source.

Bright Outlook for BWM Convention

The Danish Maritime Authority informed that the Ballast Water Management Convention is now one step closer to ratification following last week’s meeting of United

Chief of Naval Personnel Visits Naval Special Warfare

Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran visited Naval Special Warfare (NSW) Sailors during an all hands call on Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Oct.

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Navigation Offshore Oil Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2517 sec (4 req/sec)