Heriot-Watt University Orders ASV C-Enduro

Posted By Gabby DelGatto
Tuesday, June 24, 2014
ASV C-Enduro (Credit ASV)

Heriot-Watt University’s Edinburgh Campus, has confirmed the order of an ASV C-Enduro.

The C-Enduro Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) will be used for research in persistent and long term autonomy with multiple remote and autonomous marine platforms.

The vehicle’s primary application will be as a moving navigation and communication platform for AUV’s.

Professor David Lane of Heriot-Watt said: “The vehicle will be available to students in the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Robotics and Autonomous Systems as a research facility.

“The facility will train upward of 65 Innovation Ready PhD students in aspects of robot interaction, starting in the autumn of 2014” he continued.

The research involving C-Enduro forms part of the ROBOTARIUM national UK facility for research into the interactions amongst robots, environments, people and autonomous systems. This initiative is run by EDU-RAS (The Edinburgh Alliance in Robots and Autonomous Systems) and involves Heriot-Watt University and the University of Edinburgh.

The ASV C-Enduro was selected during a competitive tendering process which was first advertised in November 2013.

Differing from former ASV C-Enduro versions, this lighter model will be battery powered only.

The standard C-Enduro centers on a three-pillar power structure of solar power, a wind turbine and a diesel generator to maximize its sea endurance.
 


Technology

NASA May Send Submarine to Titan

NASA has unveiled plans to send a submarine into the depths of the largest ocean of Saturn's biggest moon, Titan in a bid to explore the depths of its largest ocean.

Scorpene Submarine Data Leak: Setback to Indian Navy

India has began multiple investigations to determine the extent of damage caused by the reported massive leak of secret data detailing the combat and stealth capabilities

NOAA Engineers a Better Current Sensor for Mariners

Navigating into seaports is now safer and more efficient for mariners thanks to improved NOAA technology that ships rely on to give them information about currents.

 
 
Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1346 sec (7 req/sec)