Moore Stephens Envisages Increased Pressure for Incipient Impairment in Shipping

(Press Release)
Monday, July 30, 2012

Accountant and shipping industry adviser Moore Stephens says it expects to see an increase in the sort of pressure recently exerted on shipping companies by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to make disclosure when the market value of their vessels is less than their carrying value.


The pressure for this type of disclosure, often referred to as ‘incipient impairment’, has been reflected in the 2011 filings of many SEC registrants. Moore Stephens partner David Chopping says, “The SEC has seen impairment charges in the accounts of a number of shipping companies in the last few years. But it has apparently not seen quite as many as it might have been expecting. It is easy to understand why the SEC, and others, might consider disclosure of market value to be useful information and want to see it more widely disseminated. It is more objective than valuations based on management estimates, it is more comparable across companies, and it sets benchmarks against which companies’ own policies can be assessed. Indeed, for some parties, the information might seem far more important than valuations based on projected future income streams.

“At the same time, it is equally easy to visualise objections to such disclosure. Values are to be determined on an unfixed basis, so are arguably of only limited relevance where vessels are fixed for fairly long periods with high-quality charterers. Similarly, while values may look comparable, if the fixture position differs significantly, then such comparability might be considered spurious. And even if a vessel is operating in the spot market, or a fixture is going to be ending shortly, whilst other objections might be less compelling, there are still concerns about the volatility of market values. How relevant is a valuation at a point of time in a volatile market where an asset might have many years still to operate?

“Nonetheless, it seems very unlikely that the SEC will change its mind and decide that such disclosure is not useful. It is far more likely that other bodies, and indeed investors, will start expecting to see such information. This can happen without any need for changes in the rules, and indeed the SEC has not explicitly changed the disclosure requirements. It seems to have relied more on the ‘Al Capone’ approach of a kind word; everyone already knows it has a gun!”

 

Maritime Reporter October 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Finance

Time-out for Kwanza Drilling

Statoil has decided to cancel the Stena Carron rig contract after fulfilling the work commitments in the Statoil-operated blocks 38 and 39 in the Kwanza basin offshore Angola.

Oil Deal Between Iraqi Kurdistan & Baghdad Welcomed

The United States welcomes an agreement between Iraq's central government in Baghdad and its northern Kurdistan region over the management of oil exports, U.

Nigeria to Cut Petrol Subsidy by Half

Nigeria plans to cut subsidies on petroleum products by half next year after sharp falls in global crude prices, spurred the government to revise its 2015 budget downwards,

Government Update

Nigeria to Cut Petrol Subsidy by Half

Nigeria plans to cut subsidies on petroleum products by half next year after sharp falls in global crude prices, spurred the government to revise its 2015 budget downwards,

Venezuela Ships First Crude Mixed with Algerian Oil to China

Venezuela is sending its first shipment of crude mixed with Algerian light oil to China, according to state oil company PDVSA and traders.   Venezuela recently

China Building Island Big Enough for Airstrip

Satellite images show China is building an island on a reef in the disputed Spratly Islands large enough to accommodate what could be its first offshore airstrip in the South China Sea,

Insurance

DGS Marine Advises Fixed Premium P&I Cover

DGS Marine, a leading global P&I management provider and exclusive manager for the British European and Overseas (BE&O) P&I facility, has highlighted the benefits

Russian Firms Face Huge Insurance Costs as Foreign Providers Flee

Russian companies face billions of dollars in extra insurance costs as Western sanctions prompt foreign insurance firms to start pulling out, worried that any business

WQIS President Hobbie to Retire

WQIS announces senior leadership change as president Richard Hobbie sets retirement Richard Hobbie III will retire from his position as President & CEO of the

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1491 sec (7 req/sec)