Great Lakes Coast Guard's Operation Fall Retrieve Underway

MarineLink.com
Friday, October 18, 2013
Petty Officer 2nd Class David Duenow and Chief Petty Officer Christopher Williams, crewmembers aboard Coast Guard Cutter Alder, finish installing a new cable on the cutter's crane at the cutter's homeport of Duluth, Minn. (USCG photo by Ensign Barton Nanney)

In anticipation of the coming ice season and to ensure the safety of vessels transiting the Great Lakes Basin, earlier this week the Coast Guard 9th District began its annual retrieval of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway System seasonal aids to navigation, the largest domestic ATON recovery operation in the U.S.

Operation Fall Retrieve, which affects lighted and unlighted buoys and beacons, commenced Tuesday with a goal of retrieving 1,278 navigational aids. The operation is scheduled to be completed by Dec. 28.

The 1,278 aids, approximately half in the region, are taken out of service during the winter months due to decreased vessel traffic and are replaced with smaller, lighter and more buoyant buoys, known as wintermarks or ice hulls, that are designed to actually ride underneath the ice when it comes, but still stay on location.

The 9th District's ATON system facilitates safe and efficient maritime activity in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway region by marking safe passage for domestic, international, commercial and recreational vessel traffic.

“Properly marked waterways are essential to keeping commerce moving on the Great Lakes during the winter,” said William Sharp, a marine information specialist with the 9th District’s Waterways Management Branch. “Safe navigation is crucial no matter the season.”

The Coast Guard manages 3,127 fixed and floating federal aids in the region. The waters of the U.S. and its territories are marked to assist navigation by the U.S. Aids-to-Navigation System.

This system employs a simple arrangement of colors, shapes, numbers and light characteristics to mark navigable channels, waterways and obstructions adjacent to them. ATON can provide a boater with the same type of information drivers get from street signs, stop signals, road barriers, detours and traffic lights. These aids may be anything from lighted structures, beacons, day markers, range lights, fog signals and landmarks to floating buoys.

“There is still a lot of vessel traffic throughout the Great Lakes during the winter months,” Chief Warrant Officer Ralph Kugel, the ATON manager with the 9th District’s Waterways Management Branch. “ It is important to maintain the navigational channels.”

Each aid has a purpose and helps mariners determine their location, stay out of danger, and provide safer navigation from one place to another.

To accomplish Operation Fall Retrieve, the district will employ six Coast Guard cutters, five ATON Teams; five small boat stations with ATON duties; the Lamplighters, civilian employees who manage the inland waters of Northern Minnesota; Canadian Coast Guard crews; and the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation.

In addition, members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary help inspect about 3,000 privately-owned aids to navigation in the region. For more information on Operation Fall Retrieve or to contact the district unit in your area that is participating in the operation, contact the district’s Public Affairs Office at 216-902-6020.

uscg.mil
 

Maritime Reporter April 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Environmental

US Marine Highways to Help Prepare for the Future

With America's population expected to grow by 70 million over the next 30 years, moving the goods that enrich our lives --and the freight that fuels our economy-- will be a key challenge.

Gulf of Finland Collision Related Spill Risk to Quadruple in the Future

A single oil spill can release 30,000 tonnes of oil into the ocean if two vessels collide. In grounding the high weight can lead to oil disaster, in the Baltic Sea up to 120,000 tonnes.

New Ships Meet 2020 Design Standard

A new CE Delft study has revealed that many recently constructed ships already meet the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) design efficiency standard for 2020, says Pan European Networks.

News

Iran: Maersk Boxhip Dispute Near Settlement

Iran said on Wednesday a legal settlement could be reached soon over its seizure of the Marshall-Islands flagged Maersk Tigris container ship in the Strait of Hormuz last month,

M-I SWACO Unveils Fluid, Cuttings Separator

M-I SWACO, a Schlumberger company, announced today the release of the SCREEN PULSE fluid and cuttings separator. Easily installed onto new or existing shale shakers,

Roozendaal to head MacGregor Business Area

Michel van Roozendaal (M.Sc. Aerospace Engineering; MBA INSEAD, Fontainebleau; b. 1963) has been appointed President of the MacGregor business area. He will

Coast Guard

Indian Sailors Return Home after Five Month

Fourteen Indian troopers, who have been stranded on board an oil tanker off the coast of Bahrain since December have lastly left for home, says a report in Gulf Daily news.

Turkish Coastguard Rescues 636 Migrants

Turkey's coastguard has rescued more than 600 people trying to cross the Aegean sea over the last five days, including women and children fleeing war-torn Syria in rubber boats,

Forty Migrants Drowned in Med on Sunday

Around forty migrants died in the Mediterranean on Sunday, according to survivors of the journey who arrived on the southern Italian island of Sicily on Tuesday,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2558 sec (4 req/sec)