Somali Pirates Sentenced for the Murder of Four Americans

MarineLink.com
Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Somali nationals Ahmed Muse Salad, a/k/a “Afmagalo,” 27, Abukar Osman Beyle, 33, and Shani Nurani Shiekh Abrar, 31, who were previously found guilty of piracy, murder within the special maritime and territorial jurisdiction of the United States, violence against maritime navigation, conspiracy to commit violence against maritime navigation resulting in death, kidnapping resulting in death, conspiracy to commit kidnapping, hostage taking resulting in death, conspiracy to commit hostage taking resulting in death and multiple firearms offenses, were sentenced this week. Salad, Beyle and Abrar were all sentenced to 21 life sentences, 19 consecutive life sentences and two concurrent life sentences, and 30 years consecutive, for their role in the February 22, 2011, murder of four Americans aboard the sailing vessel Quest. The victims included: Scott Underwood Adam, Jean Savage Adam, Phyllis Patricia Macay, and Robert Campbell Riggle.

Dana J. Boente, Acting United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, George Venizelos, Assistant Director in Charge (ADIC) of the FBI’s New York Field Office; Royce E. Curtin, Special Agent in Charge (SAC) of the FBI’s Norfolk Field Office, and Charles T. May, Special Agent in Charge of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) Norfolk Field Office, made the announcement after sentencing by Chief United States District Court Judge Rebecca Beach Smith.

“These defendants, in violation of U.S. and international law, commandeered an American-flagged sailing vessel, refused to release the hostages to the Navy, and brutally murdered the four Americans on board,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Boente. “The multiple, consecutive life sentences imposed today send a clear message that piracy, hostage-taking, and murder on the high seas will not be tolerated.”

Assistant Director in Charge George Venizelos said, “The sad fact about this case is that four Americans are dead because of the actions taken by the defendants and their associates in the form of modern-day piracy. On a fateful day in February 2011, they boarded the sailing vessel Quest with the goal of using violence to get monetary gains. Today’s life sentences provide a vigorous deterrent to armed bandits roaming our seas. The FBI remains vigilant in our responsibility to bring these pirates to justice.”

Charles T. May, Special Agent in Charge Charles T. May said, "NCIS worked closely with our uniformed partners in the Navy, the FBI, and the United States Attorney's Office of the Eastern District of Virginia in bringing these Somali pirates to justice for their senseless kidnapping and murder of four American citizens. Piracy and other transnational crimes such as narcoterrorism and human trafficking represent global threats to maritime security. NCIS, with our unique mission, is especially well-suited to investigating acts of piracy on the high seas, and we will continue to work with our U.S. and foreign law enforcement partners and prosecutorial entities from the U.S. and foreign nations to eradicate this global menace. "

Salad, Beyle and Abrar, were indicted in a 26-count indictment on July 8, 2011 and were found guilty by a federal jury of all 26 counts on July 8, 2013. According to court records and evidence at trial, Salad, Beyle and Abrar, along with coconspirators, gained control of the Quest while armed with firearms and a rocket-propelled grenade and took the four Americans hostage on February 18, 2011. Their plan was to take the hostages to Somalia, where they and their additional coconspirators in Somalia could commence ransom negotiations. While they sailed toward Somalia, they took turns standing armed guard over the hostages; at the same time, United States Navy ships headed towards the Quest to aid the hostages and attempt to secure their safe release.

On February 22, 2011, without provocation and before the hostages could be rescued by members of the military, a coconspirator fired an RPG in the general direction of the USS Sterett. Witnesses testified that sustained firing came from the Quest and that glass could be seen breaking on the starboard side of the Quest. Witnesses also testified that Salad, Beyle, and Abrar, were the shooters and responsible for the deaths of Scott Adam, Jean Adam, Phyllis Macay, and Robert Riggle. After the gunfire died down, the Navy dispatched SEALS to the Quest. The pirates aboard the Quest began surrendering and some were seen throwing AK-47 rifles into the water.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. Assistant United States Attorneys Benjamin L. Hatch, Joseph DePadilla and Brian J. Samuels prosecuted the case on behalf of the United States.

justice.gov
 

Maritime Reporter August 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navy

Next LCS to be Named USS Minneapolis/St. Paul

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that the next Freedom-variant littoral combat ship will be named USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS 21). The future Minneapolis/St.

HMS Prince of Wales’ Final Carrier Block Delivered

The final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier produced by Cammell Laird arrived at Babcock Rosyth Facilities in Fife on Thursday, September 3,

Canadian Frigates Get a Radar Upgrade

German navigation system manufacturer Raytheon Anschütz has completed factory acceptance tests and delivery of 12 sets of navigation radars for the Canadian Navy’s Halifax-class frigates.

Maritime Security

Next LCS to be Named USS Minneapolis/St. Paul

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that the next Freedom-variant littoral combat ship will be named USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS 21). The future Minneapolis/St.

HMS Prince of Wales’ Final Carrier Block Delivered

The final sections of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier produced by Cammell Laird arrived at Babcock Rosyth Facilities in Fife on Thursday, September 3,

Virginia-Class Submarine Named USS Iowa

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus hosted a ship-naming ceremony today in Ames, Iowa to announce that SSN 797, a Virginia-class attack submarine, will bear the name USS Iowa.

News

USCG Respopnds to Sunken Vessel Near Sitka, Alaska

The Coast Guard is responding to the sinking of a fishing vessel in Kelp Bay near Sitka Friday. Coast Guard personnel from Sector Juneau, the Coast Guard

Next LCS to be Named USS Minneapolis/St. Paul

Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that the next Freedom-variant littoral combat ship will be named USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS 21). The future Minneapolis/St.

MSC Upgrades Europe-West Africa Service

As part of our objective to continually improve our services to customers, MSC is delighted to announce an upgrade to its Angola Express service with a first

Government Update

Timing in Doubt on Hapag-Lloyd IPO

German container shipping group Hapag-Lloyd has taken further steps in preparation of a stock market listing and has mandated more banks for the move, but it remains

Australia's New Shipping Laws Threaten Loss of Jobs

The planned changes to Australia’s shipping laws would cause a 93% loss of Australian seafaring jobs a new report says.   More than nine in 10 domestic seafarers

Proposed Shipping Legislation to Jeopardise$100-million Investment in Australia

Australian-owned Bass Strait shipping operator SeaRoad Holdings has warned the Federal Government that its proposed Shipping Legislation Amendment Bill could jeopardise

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Pipelines Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.7864 sec (1 req/sec)