Great Lakes Shipyard Awarded Coast Guard Contract

Press Release
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
USCG Cutter Neah Bay: Photo credit Great Layes Shipyard

The shipyard has been awarded a drydocking & repair contract for the United States Coast Guard Cutter 'Neah Bay' (WTGB-105).

Contracted work includes routine drydocking and underwater hull maintenance, including inspection and testing of propulsion systems; overhaul of sea valves and shaft seal assemblies; and other various cleaning, inspections, and repairs.

This will be the first of the USCG’s nine (9) 140-foot Bay Class ice breaking tugs to be drydocked using Great Lakes Shipyard’s new Marine Travelift. The Travelift, with a lift capacity of 770-tons, was specifically designed and sized to accommodate the Bay-Class Coast Guard Cutters.

Work on the 'Neah Bay' will begin in early May 2013 and is expected to be completed by late June.
 

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