Marine Link
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Oldest Steamship Gets New Home on Thames

September 16, 2010

According to a Sept. 13 report from BBC News, a ship thought to be the last steamcoaster in the world is preparing to head to her new home after a $2.9m restoration in Suffolk. The steamcoaster, built in 1890 and listed on the National Historic Fleet register, has been converted into a floating museum. She will stay at the Port of Tilbury for up to a year while a decision is made on her London base. The SS Robin was taken to Lowestoft in 2008 to undergo conservation work and repairs to her riveted structure. The work has been funded by Crossrail. Project management consultants Kampfner Limited led a team of East Anglian and London-based marine consultants, engineers, naval architects and shipwrights in the two-year restoration project.

(Source: BBC News)



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