UK's Latest Submarine Arrives Homeport For Sea Trials

Press Release
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
Submarine 'Ambush': Photo credit MOD

'Ambush', second of the Royal Navy's, new Astute Class attack submarines, sails into Her Majesty's Naval Base Clyde today to begin sea trials.

The 7,400-tonne submarine sailed from the shipyard in Barrow-in-Furness in Cumbria, where she was built, to HM Naval Base Clyde in Scotland.

The seven Astute-class boats planned for the Royal Navy are the most advanced and powerful attack submarines Britain has ever sent to sea. They feature the latest nuclear-powered technology, which means they never need to be refuelled and can circumnavigate the world submerged, manufacturing the crew's oxygen from seawater as she goes.

Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology Philip Dunne said:
"Ambush's arrival at her home port to begin her sea trials marks a key milestone in the Astute Class submarine programme and is testament to the skills of those involved in the UK's world class submarine-building industry." He continued, "Ambush is an immensely powerful and advanced vessel that will deliver an important capability to the Royal Navy giving it the versatility and technical excellence needed to operate successfully across the globe."




 

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