Two Vessels Join SAL Heavy Lift’s Fleet

By Eric Haun
Wednesday, July 09, 2014
Amoenitas loading tugs in China (photo courtesy of SAL Heavy Lift)

Both vessels named after historical predecessors; first voyages already booked

SAL Heavy Lift, one of the world’s leading heavy lift vessel operators, has added two ships, Calypso and Amoenitas, to its fleet to serve clients with lift requirements of up to 900 metric tons.

SAL's type 183 vessels and 176 vessels are well planned ahead, so SAL's expansion with type 116 responds to the growing demand for its mid-range services on the part of customers worldwide.

“As our vessels are in great demand, and we feel that this demand will continue to grow, now is the right time to expand,” said Lars Rolner, Managing Director of SAL Heavy Lift GmbH. "Adding the Calypso and Amoenitas, each of which has a lift capacity of 900 metric tons and the highest ice class, will let us take on more repeat and first-time customers, even when they come to us with urgent or short-notice requests.”

Owing to this large number in requests the first voyages of both ships are already fully booked.

The Amoenitas has already left Masan, South Korea and travels to the Black Sea port of Mangalia in Romania carrying a cargo of engines. On the way there, the vessel made a port call in China to load three tugs weighing up to 685 metric tons each, which were discharged in Myanmar.

The Calypso has loaded project cargo, including a reactor over 500 metric tons, in Thailand for delivery to the United States in August.

The names of both vessels were chosen for historical reasons. In 1984, the original Calypso became the first ordered heavy lift vessel to be added to SAL’s fleet. The historical S.S. Amoenitas was the first ship purchased by SAL's founding family, the Heinrichs, in 1865; it came freshly built from the Sietas shipyard. Both names are intended to honor Hans Heinrich, who passed away in December 2013.

sal-heavylift.com
 

  • Amoenitas loading tugs in China (photo courtesy of SAL Heavy Lift)

    Amoenitas loading tugs in China (photo courtesy of SAL Heavy Lift)

  • Amoenitas loading tugs in China (photo courtesy of SAL Heavy Lift)

    Amoenitas loading tugs in China (photo courtesy of SAL Heavy Lift)

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