Subsea Camera from Battelle

Posted by Irina Tabakina
Tuesday, June 24, 2014
Courtesy: Battelle

A new camera developed by Battelle aims to reduce the time, effort and expense needed to create complete 360-degree viewpoints in the depths of the ocean or in other hard to reach places. The HorizonVue M360 Deep combines Battelle’s history in maritime engineering technology with RemoteReality’s specialized optic designs and software to create a unique instrument capable of providing continuous 360-degree video feed at the ocean’s surface or depths of up to 10,000 ft., the manufacturer said.
Intended for use by the ocean science community, it can be installed on underwater robots, ROVs, submarine periscopes or other stationary observation platforms. The camera also could be used by the oil and gas industry for enhanced underwater awareness in harsh environments.
Current technologies rely on multiple cameras including those that can pan, tilt and zoom. For example, Google trucks drive down the street with numerous cameras that capture images which are then “stitched” together to create the panoramic view, which takes time. During the Gulf Oil spill, underwater footage was captured by ROVs with multiple cameras. The HorizonVue M360 Deep can perform all these activities with just one camera and is lighter, smaller and uses less power than others on the market. An acrylic housing protects the camera so that it can withstand 5,000 pounds of pressure per square inch.


(As published in the June 2014 edition of Marine Technology Reporter -

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