AWO, WCI: 9' Drafts Must be Maintained in Mississippi

press release
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Michael Toohey, WCI President & CEO.

Waterways Operators Commend Administration, Senator Durbin, Corps of Engineers; Stress Need for Continued Assurance of 9-Foot Navigation Channel on Mississippi River.

 

The American Waterways Operators (AWO) and Waterways Council, Inc. (WCI) reacted today to recent statements from Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers which indicate that the Mississippi River will be able to sustain navigation through the end of January for towboats and barges at a 9-foot draft, as rock pinnacle removal work at Thebes, Illinois, has gone better than expected.  The Corps has also released additional water from the Carlyle Lake Reservoir to augment water depth on the mid-Mississippi.

 

AWO and WCI are grateful for the efforts of the Obama Administration, Senator Durbin, and the many other Senators, Members of Congress, and Governors from Mississippi River states, who have underscored the importance of maintaining barge traffic on the nation’s busiest water transportation artery.
The industry reiterates, however, that it continues to seek assurances that all options to maintain navigation without further restrictions on draft remain on the table, noting that certainty is particularly important, with long-range forecasts continuing to show water levels on the Mississippi dropping to historic lows.

 

“The Corps’ progress in removing rock formations and providing additional water releases is a positive development,” said Tom Allegretti, AWO’s President & CEO. “However, we are not out of the woods, and further assurances are needed to provide industry with certainty that is needed for sound business and transportation planning beyond January.”

 

“If a barge has a 14-day transit time from loading to the low points on the river, barge operators and their customers must make plans based on the forecasted water depth at the time of the barge’s arrival at the bottleneck,” said Michael Toohey, WCI President & CEO. “That is why longer-term assurance that barges can reliably load to a 9-foot draft even beyond January is absolutely critical,” he continued. 

 

Since November, barge operators and shippers have had to base operating decisions about loading, transiting and purchases based on the best available, though changing, estimates.  Economic damage has resulted from that uncertainty. In some cases, the size of tows carrying essential commodities for export and domestic use has been cut in half; transit times have more than doubled; orders have been cancelled or curtailed; and jobs have been jeopardized.

 

“There is too much at stake for businesses and their customers that depend on the river, as well as the economies of Mississippi River states and ultimately the country, to put our hopes in best-case scenarios,” Allegretti and Toohey agreed. “Without an assurance that a 9-foot draft will be maintained throughout the winter months, we lack certainty that the nation’s most important waterway will continue to effectively move the nation’s commerce.” 

Maritime Reporter January 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Bulk Carrier Trends

Baltic Sea Freight Index Falls to Lowest Level Since 1986

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, which tracks rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, spiralled downwards to its lowest level in nearly three

Pacifica Rolls Out New Container Vessel

Pacifica Shipping, New Zealand's coastal shipping company, is launching a new container vessel from March replacing a smaller vessel whose charter has ended, reports The Stuff.

Shipping Pollution Will Skyrocket -Study

International freight volumes will grow fourfold by 2050 while the average length of haul will increase by 12 percent over that time, trends that will cause a spike

Ports

China Watching Greece After Port Sale Shelved

China is closely monitoring the policies of the new Greek government after Athens said this week it will stop the sale of a majority stake in Greece's biggest port,

Greece's New Shipping Minister Stalls Port Privatization

Thodoris Dritsas is taken charge as Greece's new shipping minister following the electoral victory of the country's left-wing party Syriza. Among the first decision

Fender Repairs Works for Dolphins at Hong Kong

For approximately four months, fender repairing and replacement works for five of the dolphins will be carried out in the To Kwa Wan Typhoon Shelter. The

Navigation

Navigational Charts App Debuts at Ocean Business

An independent consultancy and software development company will launch a new web and PC based navigational charting app at Ocean Business 2015.   Norcom Technology

Australian Tall Ship Rounds Cape Horn

The Royal Australian Navy operated Sail Training Ship Young Endeavour rounded Cape Horn on Australia Day, 36 days into a 12-month circumnavigation of the world.

Fender Repairs Works for Dolphins at Hong Kong

For approximately four months, fender repairing and replacement works for five of the dolphins will be carried out in the To Kwa Wan Typhoon Shelter. The

Maritime Safety

Safeguarding Maritime Power Connections

KIRK interlocking products provide safe electrical access during cold ironing, ensuring that ship power cables are properly coupled to shore power junction boxes before energizing.

Australia Bolsters SAR in Indian Ocean Region

AMSA leading program to strengthen search and rescue capabilities in Indian Ocean region   The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) said it has commenced

NOAA Satellites Help Rescue 240 People Last Year

Last year, 240 people were saved from potentially life-threatening situations throughout the United States and its surrounding waters with help from NOAA’s fleet of weather satellites.

Government Update

Bill Proposed to Repay WWII Merchant Mariners

Congresswoman Janice Hahn (Calif.) and Congressman John Duncan Jr. (Tenn.) introduced the “Honoring Our WWII Merchant Mariners Act of 2015,” which would provide

Dozens Missing off Bangladesh after Boat Sinks

About 40 illegal migrants heading from Bangladesh to Malaysia to look for work were missing on Thursday after their boat sank, police said. A steady stream of

Shell: UK Should Reduce North Sea Oil Tax

The British government should review a supplementary tax charge on North Sea oil producers as it has made the operation of some fields unrealistic, Shell Chief

Logistics

Stolt-Nielsen Q4 Profit Misses Forecast

Shipping firm Stolt-Nielsen reported fourth quarter earnings below forecasts on Thursday and said it was concerned about the outlook for the chemical tanker market,

China Watching Greece After Port Sale Shelved

China is closely monitoring the policies of the new Greek government after Athens said this week it will stop the sale of a majority stake in Greece's biggest port,

Shell Eyes Arctic Drilling this Summer

Oil major Shell wants to revive its Arctic oil drilling programme this year after a near two-year suspension, angering environmentalists who say the risk of an oil spill is too high.

 
 
Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1612 sec (6 req/sec)