NOAA Seafloor Mapping Project Delivers Diverse Data

Press Release
Thursday, October 11, 2012
Bathymetric Survey Long Island Sound: Image courtesy NOAA

NOAA ship 'Thomas Jefferson' mapping Long Island Sound seafloor this summer contributes to a multi-level data gathering collaboration.

In addition to updating NOAA’s nautical charts, ongoing collaborations in Long Island Sound will create products that depict physical, geological, ecological, geomorphological, and biological conditions and processes – all to balance the development of new ocean uses while protecting and restoring essential habitats.

In 2011, the Long Island Sound Program (representing a partnership between the State of Connecticut, State of New York, Connecticut and New York Sea Grant, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) asked NOAA for help in providing management and technical expertise; acquiring data; and developing products. They required key temporal and spatial information about seafloor conditions in the Sound. They needed bathymetry and backscatter, and biological and physical observational and sampling data, to produce all the products needed by governments, industry, academia, and the public.

It so happened that Coast Survey already had plans for NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson to survey in Long Island Sound, to acquire new bathymetry for chart updates. With some adjustments to survey areas and project parameters, a mutually beneficial partnership was formed for long-term seafloor mapping of Long Island Sound habitats over the next several years, as an integrated ocean and coastal mapping project.

This summer, Thomas Jefferson conducted hydrographic surveys in the mid-Sound area of Stratford Shoal and vicinity, extending from New York on the north shore of Long Island to the Connecticut shoreline.

“Ocean floors are amazingly dynamic, and we have to chart those changes to provide precise and accurate navigational data for today’s maritime economy,” explained Cmdr. Lawrence Krepp, commanding officer of the Thomas Jefferson and the ship’s chief scientist. “Our data is used to update NOAA’s nautical charts, but the hydrographic information can also be used to support a number of non-navigation uses, ranging from benefits to fisheries management to support of regional ocean planning efforts like this.”

 

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter January 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Technology

Norbulk Selects Parker Kittiwake’s Cat Fines Test Kit

Parker Kittiwake, a leading global supplier of asset control and protection technology, has today announced a significant order of its recently launched Cat Fines

European Consortium Launches Blue Nodules Project

On 1 February a European consortium launched a new Horizon 2020 project: Blue Nodules. This project addresses the challenge of creating a viable and sustainable

Seafarers help Sought to Improve Onboard Design

The Nautical Institute and CIRM (the principal international association for marine electronics companies) today launched a joint initiative to improve the usability

Navigation

New Autonomous Control System Launched

Sea Machines Robotics of Cambridge, Mass. announced the release of its Autonomous Control System (ACS), an advanced vessel control system which converts manually

Videotel, Safebridge JV for Onboard ECDIS Certification

Videotel, a provider of e-Learning maritime training solutions and a company of KVH Industries, has joined forces with online maritime training business Safebridge GmbH,

DNV GL, RS Ink Cooperation Deal

DNV GL’s Maritime CEO Knut Ørbeck-Nilssen recently met with Konstantin Palnikov, Director General of the Russian Maritime Register of Shipping (RS), at the RS head office in St.

Marine Science

European Consortium Launches Blue Nodules Project

On 1 February a European consortium launched a new Horizon 2020 project: Blue Nodules. This project addresses the challenge of creating a viable and sustainable

Shipping Traffic Noise Severely Affects Whale Populations

Underwater sound pollution disrupts the communication methods of killer whales and could harm their ability to locate salmon, researchers have found.   Increasing

Videotel, Safebridge JV for Onboard ECDIS Certification

Videotel, a provider of e-Learning maritime training solutions and a company of KVH Industries, has joined forces with online maritime training business Safebridge GmbH,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Pipelines Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1062 sec (9 req/sec)