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Friday, September 30, 2016

Washington State Ferries a Step Closer to LNG Propulsion

November 22, 2013

LNG Bunker tanks on upper deck: Rendering courtesy of WSF

LNG Bunker tanks on upper deck: Rendering courtesy of WSF

Washington State Ferries say they are another step closer to significantly reducing fuel costs and transportation emissions by switching a class of vessels from diesel fuel to liquefied natural gas (LNGLF).

After more than three years of study, WSF has a plan to safely convert six Issaquah Class vessels to run on cleaner-burning LNG. The proposal has been officially submitted to the U.S. Coast Guard in a formal letter of intent (LOI) and waterways suitability assessment (WSA). The submission of the LOI and WSA marks the official starting point of the Coast Guard’s review process. WSF expects the Coast Guard to issue a finding regarding the LNG conversion proposal in 2014.

“Fuel is WSF’s fastest growing operating expense,” said David Moseley, assistant secretary for the Washington State Department of Transportation, Ferries Division. “Replacing diesel with LNG on the Issaquah Class ferries could result in very substantial savings on fuel over the remaining 30 years of their service life. This will also mean a cleaner, more efficient future for our fleet by significantly decreasing emissions.”

The average Issaquah Class vessel carries up to 124 cars and 1,200 passengers, serving on some of the state’s busiest ferry routes. Converting the fuel systems from ultra-low sulfur diesel to LNG would significantly reduce emissions according to WSDOT's Air Emissions Model, including:

    •    89 percent reduction in particulate matter
    •    61 percent reduction in nitrous oxide
    •    28 percent reduction in carbon dioxide
    •    59 percent reduction in sulfur dioxide

For the proposed LNG conversions, WSF would install main propulsion engines to use natural gas and retrofit LNG fuel tanks on the top decks of the six vessels. The proposal calls for a phased approach for conversions to avoid schedule changes or delays. Once vessels are converted and back in service, they would begin a routine overnight, out-of-service refueling process similar to current diesel refueling.

 



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