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Sunday, January 21, 2018

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EU Calls For Single-Hull Phase Out

European Union governments on Monday called for single-hull oil tankers to be phased out as part of their response to the Erika oil spill disaster. The EU wants to ban single-hull vessels like the Erika which ran aground off the northern French coast in December 1999 spilling some 8,000 tons of fuel oil into the sea to be banned at the latest by 2012. Transport ministers from the 15 EU countries agreed their common stance on Monday morning, in time to influence negotiations on the controversial ships at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) this week.

EU Bans Single-Hull Tankers

The Council of the European Union issued a Provisional Version of its 2499th Council meeting, which focused on transport issues. Under the plan, which must still be approved by the European Parliament, single-hull tankers over 5,000 dwt carrying heavy oils would be banned from EU ports. Single-hull tankers between 600 and 5,000 dwt carrying heavy oils would be banned from 2008. Pre-MARPOL single-hull tankers over 5,000 dwt would be banned from 2005. MARPOL single-hull tankers would be banned as from 2010. In press release issued by the EC, Vice-President Loyola de Palacio welcomed the action. The Council also considered proposals to increase sanctions for ship-source pollution…

South Korea to Ban Single-Hulled Tankers after Spill

Reuters reported that South Korea will ban single-hulled tankers from traveling in its waters by 2011, earlier than the international regulation that calls for a ban from 2015, Seoul's maritime ministry said. A single-hulled tanker was involved in South Korea's worst oil spill last month, leaking around 10,500 tons of crude oil after a sea-bound crane mounted on a barge punched holes in the tanker's hull. As of January, 43 per cent of the crude imported into South Korea was carried by single-hulled tankers. This is the first time the ministry has officially set a time frame for banning the tankers. The ministry had previously said it was aiming to phase out single-hulled tankers as soon as 2010.

Single Hull Tanker Ban Could Send Freight Rates Soaring

When OPA 90 was introduced in wake of the Valdez accident, the stipulation that tankers trading in the U.S. must be double hulled was roundly panned throughout the world, as industry experts bemoaned the fact that one country have such a deciding impact on vessel design. How soon they forget. Ten years and a few tragic sinkings off European shores have let to Italy's sudden plan to ban single-hulled tankers from seven key port areas, a move which some contend will cripple a pipeline feeding oil to Germany from the Italian port of Trieste, a leading brokerage warned. "The ban will be felt in Germany and Austria," said Italy's largest brokerage Banchero Costa.

Philippines to Ban Single-Hull Vessels

The Philippines will ban single-hull oil tankers from its waters from April, two years earlier than planned, after the worst oil spill in the country's history and a separate leak in South Korea. Vessels carrying "black" petroleum products such as crude oil and bunker fuel won't be allowed to dock at ports from April 1 without a double hull, said Transportation Undersecretary Len Bautista in a phone interview from Manila. The single-hull crude oil supertanker Hebei Spirit caused the worst spill in South Korea's history last month after it was struck by a crane causing it to lose 66,000 barrels of crude oil, about 1/3 the size of the Exxon Valdez spill of 1989.

Italy To Ban Single Skin Tankers From 7 Ports

Italy plans to ban single hull tankers from seven port areas from April 23 to reduce risks of environmental damage, said an anonymous Environment Ministry official said. The official confirmed remarks by Environment Minister Willer Bordon in Genoa earlier this week that the government was preparing a directive aimed at improving safety standards. "This directive represents a notable leap in safety," Bordon said on the sidelines of a seminar on maritime oil traffic organized by local environmental groups. The ban will apply to the following seven port areas: a sea mammal sanctuary stretching from the upper Tyrrhenian Sea to the Ligurian Sea…

France Takes Steps Toward Safer Ships

Transport Minister Jean-Claude Gayssot supported a French industry charter to tighten oil tanker safety aimed at making oil spills like the recent Erika disaster a thing of the past. Gayssot said a pact signed by French oil companies, shipowners and charterers showed they were impatient to move immediately to improve safety standards rather than wait for international regulations to be tightened. Signatures on the charter, which followed five hours of negotiations, include officials from TotalFina, Elf Aquitaine, BP Amoco France, Royal Dutch/Shell France, Esso France, ship classification firm Bureau Veritas and petroleum industries federation UFIP.

S. Korea: Shipyards May Raise Prices 5%

South Korea's seven shipbuilders, which delivered 38 percent of the world's vessels in 2005, said they may raise the prices of new ships by about five percent to take advantage of record orders and protect their profits from rising costs, according to a report from Bloomberg. Higher prices protect shipbuilders' earnings from the Korean won's gains against the U.S. dollar and shield them from steel costs that have risen 70 percent since 2003. A third year of rising ship prices add to the costs of Taiwan's Evergreen Marine Corp. and other shipping lines which carry an estimated 90 percent of global trade. The price of a supertanker that can hold 2 million barrels of oil rose 4 percent to about $125 million in December, the Korea Shipbuilders Association said, citing Clarkson Plc.

Single-hull Tankers Banned from October 21

The Regulation banning single-hull oil tankers from European ports has been published in the Official Journal(1) and entered into force October 21, 2003. From that date single-hull oil tankers may not be used to carry heavy grades of oil to or from EU ports. In addition, the timetable for the phasing-out of such tankers has been speeded up, and oil tankers more than 23 years old, as the Erika and the Prestige were, are banned from EU ports immediately. During the gradual phasing-out period, tankers 15 or more years old will undergo exhaustive technical inspections. The EU is now focusing on the international arena in order to have similar measures introduced by everyone concerned.

Shipping Officials To Discuss Singe Hull Phase Out

Shipping legislators meet on Monday to discuss a timetable for eliminating single-hulled tankers, a pollution threat to the world's coastlines. But major maritime nation Brazil looks set to oppose the ban, proposed by the European Union, which eventually would see the world's fleet limited to double-hulled tankers. Shipping sources said many more countries were planning to back Brazil's position at the meeting in London of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). IMO, during a week-long session, will discuss possible deadlines of either 2015 or 2017 by which time all the world's single-hulled tanker fleet would have to sail to the scrapping beaches. The meeting is under the Marine Environmental Protection Committee, which is comprised of 113 nations from IMO's 158 members' states.

Commission Urged to Fit Black Boxes For Oil Tanker Safety

AMRIE (The Alliance of Maritime Regional Interests in Europe) last week presented a series of recommendations aimed at improving levels of oil tanker safety in response to recent Commission proposals on the safety of the seaborne oil trade. The AMRIE Paper calls on the Commission to lead the way in introducing requirements for Black Boxes to be fitted in all existing cargo ships, going beyond the IMO (International Maritime Organization) suggestion of new cargo ships only. AMRIE believes that the speedy introduction of Voyage Data Recorders to all vessels is imperative if the Commission is to achieve a 'Safety Culture' in Shipping. AMRIE…

Single Hull Tanker Deadline Almost Agreed

Shipping legislators are close to agreeing a deadline for eliminating single-hulled tankers, a pollution hazard to the world's oceans and coastlines. "The deadline is 2015, but there's lots of ifs and buts," said a source, who sits a working group of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), shipping's self-regulated legislative body. "Now we'll have to put it before the committee and see what reaction we get," the source said. If the 113 committee members approve the deal hammered out by the working group of 40, then all single-hulled tankers will have to undergo major structural enhancements or be scrapped by 2015. The source on the working group said a difficult but vital step would be getting the approval of IMO's European Union (EU) members…

Magufuli Bans Registration of Foreign Ships in Tanzania

© Igor Groshev / Adobe Stock

Tanzanian President John Magufuli on Friday put a temporary ban on the registration of foreign ships in the country and ordered over 400 vessels to be investigated for allegations of involvement in criminal activity. The ban came after at least five foreign-owned ships flying Tanzania's flag were seized in various parts of the world carrying illegal consignments of weapons and narcotics. The maritime authority in the Indian Ocean archipelago of Zanzibar has in previous years been…

Commission Urged to Mandate Marine

AMRIE (The Alliance of Maritime Regional Interests in Europe) will today present a series of recommendations aimed at improving levels of oil tanker safety in response to recent Commission proposals on the safety of the seaborne oil trade. The AMRIE Paper calls on the Commission to lead the way in introducing requirements for Black Boxes to be fitted in ALL existing cargo ships, going beyond the IMO (International Maritime Organisation) suggestion of new cargo ships only. AMRIE believes that the speedy introduction of Voyage Data Recorders to all vessels is imperative if the Commission is to achieve a ‘Safety Culture’ in Shipping. AMRIE…

Steamship Reports First Nine-Months Results

A/S Steamship Co TORM (TORM), a shipping company specializing in the worldwide commercial operation of a fleet of tankers and bulk carriers, reported its results for the first nine months of 2003. Net profit for the third quarter 2003 was DKK 232 million ($35 million), including an unrealized gain on the Company's investment in Dampskibsselskabet "NORDEN" A/S; and net profit for the first nine months of 2003 was DKK 468 million ($70 million), including an unrealized gain on the NORDEN shares. Profit before depreciation was DKK 413 million ($62 million) for the first nine months of 2003, while profit before financial items was DKK 284 million ($42 million) for the first nine months of 2003.

Ocean Freight Shipping Rates on the Rise

After a downtrend in the freight shipping tanker market since the middle of 2007, the industry has seen nothing but rate increases in the last month. The cost of freight shipping can mean an increase in the cost of many consumer products, according to FreightBrokering.info, which is why it's so important to keep freight transportation costs down. There are many reasons why the costs of ocean freight shipping have increased. Indian Oil Corporation recently paid $9 million in freight transportation charges for shipping crude oil on a very large crude carrier from West Africa to Vadinar, India. The high freight rate was a result of oil firms scrambling to hire ships before the holiday season started, leading to a shortage of ships.

South Korea's Shipyards May Raise Prices

Bloomberg has reported that South Korea's seven shipbuilders, which delivered 38 percent of the world's vessels in 2005, said they may raise the prices of new ships to take advantage of record orders and protect their profits from rising costs. Carriers of containers, oil and minerals may cost about 5 percent more this year, said Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries company officials. Higher prices protect shipbuilders' earnings from the Korean won's gains against the U.S. dollar and shield them from steel costs that have risen 70 percent since 2003. A third year of rising ship prices add to the costs of Taiwan's Evergreen Marine Corp. and other shipping lines which carry an estimated 90 percent of global trade.

Shipowners Balk at Double-hull Tankers Cost

According to Inq7.net, Philippine’s shipowners are asking for more time to replace their single-hull tankers with double-hull vessels because the capital and maintenance costs for the hardier vessels are higher. Single hull tankers, which are being phased out around the world, have become the subject of revived scrutiny in the country following the August 11 sinking of the weather-beaten MT Solar I off Guimaras Island. The sunken vessel unleashed a massive oil spill. Stakeholders in the shipping industry wanted the ban on single-hull vessels implemented in 2015. While some expect the ban to be enforced as early as 2008, others believe that more time will be required since shipowners are finding the transition from single-hull to double-hull too costly.

S. Korea Plans Ban on Single Hull Tankers

In the wake of the country's worst oil spill, South Korea reportedly plans to introduce a ban on single-hulled tankers, according to an AFP report. A drifting barge hit a 147,000-ton Hong Kong-registered tanker Hebei Spirit on December 7, holing it in three places, resulting in an estimated 10,900 ton crude oil spill. According to the AFP report, the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries is mulling moving up the country's single-hull phase out from 2015 to 2010.

IMO Adopts Accelerated Single-Hull Tanker Phase-Out

The IMO issued a News Release stating that the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) adopted a revised, accelerated phase-out for single-hull tankers, along with other measures including an extended application of the Condition Assessment Scheme (CAS) for tankers and a new regulation banning the carriage of Heavy Grades of Oil (HGO) in single-hull tankers. The final phasing-out of Category 1 (pre-MARPOL) tankers was brought forward from 2007 to 2005. The final phasing-out of Category 2 (MARPOL) and 3 (smaller) tankers was brought forward from 2015 to 2010, but exceptions apply for certain tankers completing a satisfactory CAS. The ban on carriage of HGO in single-hull tankers would take effect on 4 April 2005, but exceptions apply for certain tankers completing a satisfactory CAS.

S. Korea Refiner Steps Up Single Hull Ban

South Korea's GS Caltex will reportedly ban crude shipments on single-hulled oil tankers from next year, according to a Reuters report, well ahead of international laws that timetable their phase out. The move is significant in Asia, particularly if others follow suit. Pending the actions of others, the move could have a ripple effect on the shipbuilding industry and the need for double hull tankers. The industry is currently in the midst of a record orderbook, with much shipbuilding capacity booked through 2011.

S. Korea: Ban on Single Hull Tankers in 2011

South Korea will ban, according to a Yonhap report, all single-hull tanker operations starting in 2011. The news agency reported that the Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs said that all locally registered single-hull tankers with a deadweight tonnage of 5,000 tons will be barred from operating in territorial waters as of Jan. 1. It also said single-hull foreign ships will be barred from entering South Korean ports. (Source: Yonhap)

Single-Hull Numbers Fall to 7% of Fleet

According to a June 7 report from Emirates Business 24/7, even as the UAE gears up to ban all single-hull tankers by the end of the year, their number has decreased drastically while demand from countries with inland transportation has increased. The number of single-hulls in the market has dropped to almost seven percent of the total fleet and 2010 would be the right time to scrap the ships, according to a recent report published by McQuilling Services. (Source: Business Emirates 24/7)

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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