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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Sea Diver News

Photo of the Day

Petty Officer 1st Class Julius Mcmanus, assigned to Mobile Diving Salvage Unit (MDSU) 1, plants an American flag on the site where an American WWII military aircraft crashed into the . Deep sea divers are assigned to Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) accounting of all Americans missing as a result of the nation's past conflicts. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Christopher Perez

U.S. Company To Assist Russian Sub

Russia signed a deal with an American company - the Norwegian arm of Halliburton -- to recover at least some of the bodies of the 118 sailors who died when the submarine sank to the bottom of the Arctic ocean in August. The Rubin design bureau, which designed the nuclear-powered Kursk, signed a contract with Halliburton to provide what is essentially logistical support for an operation to be carried out by Russian deep-sea divers. But the logistical and technical difficulties of the operation, which will begin in just over two weeks, mean that perhaps as few as 30 or 35 bodies may be recovered, at least until the entire vessel is raised next year.

Russians Explore Sunken USN Ship

Weapons and equipment from the American ship “Thomas Donaldson”

Northern Fleet divers salvage weapons and equipment from the American ship “Thomas Donaldson”, which sank after a German submarine attack outside Murmansk in 1945. Divers from the Northern Fleet’s search and rescue department in 2014 started an operation to bring weapons and equipment from the American vessel to the surface. Last year a Sherman tank was raised. It has been restored and is now displayed at a museum in Safonovo outside Severomorsk, barentsobserver.com reports. The…

Russian Maritime Security Firm Protests Nigeria Detainment

In September 2012 Moscow-based crew members of the arms-carrying 'MV Myre Seadiver' were arrested in Lagos & detained without trial. In September 2012 Moscow-based crew members of the MV Myre Seadiver were conducting professional and legitimate counter-piracy operations along Africa's western coast when, in October, their anchorage in Nigeria's Port of Lagos took a fateful turn. Ignoring the fact that all permits, licenses and clearances were in place, the Nigerian Navy captured the Master and crew of fifteen Russian sailors on the eve of their departure from the Port of Lagos. Held for months in a bleak Lagos prison without charge or trial…

Famous Navy Diver Passes

Master Chief Petty Officer (Ret) Carl Brashear passed away on July 25 at the Portsmouth Naval Hospital at 2:35 pm. He was made famous when the movie "Men of Honor" portrayed his Navy career. Brashear was played by Cuba Good Jr. Brashear died from respiratory and heart failure at the age of 75. He joined the navy at 17-years-old and was the first African American deep sea diver for the Navy, the first African American Master Diver and the first person in Naval history to be restored to active duty as an amputee. He was at the hospital for less than a week. Family was at his side when he passed, including his son, Phillip Brashear, an Army helicopter pilot who is on emergency leave from Iraq. Brashear was born on January 19, 1931 in Tonieville, Larue County, Kentucky.

Kursk Rescue Hits Snag

The Russian navy said a plan to raise the Kursk nuclear submarine from the bottom of the Barents Sea hit a snag when deep-sea divers had trouble cutting through the craft's hull. Vice Admiral Mikhail Motsak, coordinating the recovery operation, said on Russian television that an international team of divers had run into problems while making holes in the craft to affix cables and eventually haul the sub up. "Everything looked fine on paper and when testing the equipment on the surface. After a series of unexplained explosions, the Kursk sank last August with the loss of all 118 people on board. President Vladimir Putin has vowed to raise the craft and dispose of its nuclear reactors.

Two New Auxiliary Dry Cargo Ships Named

Secretary of the Navy Dr. Donald C. Winter announced the naming of the seventh and eighth Lewis and Clark-class dry cargo/ammunition ships (T-AKE) as Carl Brashear and Wally Schirra. The T-AKEs are owned and operated by the U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command. The selection of Carl Brashear, designated T-AKE 7, honors Master Chief Boatswain's Mate (Master Diver) Carl M. Brashear, who joined the U.S. Navy in 1948. He was a pioneer in the Navy as the first black deep-sea diver, the first black master diver and the first U.S. Navy diver to be restored to full active duty as an amputee, the result of a leg injury he sustained during a salvage operation. After 31 years of service, Brashear officially retired from the U.S. Navy on April 1, 1979.

Damaged Crew Boat Salvaged in Gulf of Mexico

Inland Salvage Inc. completed the salvage of a crew boat in the Gulf of Mexico. The vessel began taking on water after striking a structure during offshore operations. Attempts to bring the vessel in under her own power ended approximately 15 miles offshore from Pascagoula, MS when the seas began washing over her bow. All crewmembers safely abandoned the vessel and she was soon set adrift unmanned. Inland Salvage was contacted by the owner and mobilized crews to begin salvage operations.

Rudy Teichman: A Marine Salvage Legend

Rudy Teichman (Photo: T&T Salvage)

Rudy Teichman, a legend in the U.S. marine salvage industry, founded T&T in 1957, now one of the world’s largest international salvage companies. In a sense, Rudy was larger than life and one who was often referred to as a “force of nature.” He was an entrepreneur, inventor, salvor, deep sea diver, airplane pilot, licensed mariner, restaurateur, musician, philanthropist, mechanic, machinist, politician, and husband, father and grandfather. And, in spite all of his accomplishments, he was more importantly a man of character, hard work and integrity, in a time when your word was your contract.

Diver Down!!! An Exception to the General Test for Seaman Status?

By James P. Nader & Joseph A. Once again we take that familiar voyage know as "determining seaman status." No matter how familiar the voyage there are always changes in the currents which guide your path. Seaman status is important because only a seaman may receive maintenance and cure, and pursue a claim for Jones Act negligence or unseaworthiness. The basic requirements for seaman status are well established in maritime law. In order to qualify as a seaman under the Jones Act, a person's employment duties must contribute to the mission of the vessel and be connected to an identifiable group of vessels in navigation. The United States Supreme Court has held that seaman status should be determined by the specific facts of each case.

Israeli Navy installs advanced underwater AquaShield detection system

Image of the AquaShield radar at work. (Photo: DSIT)

Israel has launched new AquaShield defense system, which locates threats posed to Israel by individual divers and small maritime crafts. The latest defense system makes Israel “100 percent impervious to all such attacks”, says a senior Israeli Naval officer in a press statement. “The chances of a diver infiltrating the system are zero. The system is proven and constitutes a sea barrier for Israel,” the naval officer explained. The Israeli Navy is currently installing the system along Israel's northern sea border…

US Navy Divers Support ROK Ship Recovery

Photo courtesy U.S. Navy

Sailors of Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 1, based out of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Mobile Unit (EODMU) 5 Platoon 501 based out of Sasebo, Japan, are diving in the Yellow Sea in support of the recovery and salvage of the Republic of Korea Ship (ROK) Cheonan. "We're here to offer all the help we can. We're ready to step in anytime and dive or assist hands-on in any way we can," said Navy Diver 3rd Class Andrew Kornelsen, a Madison, Wis., native.

Aqueos Takes Delivery DSV for Liveboating

Photo: Aqueos Corporation

Aqueos Corporation, a subsea services provider for the offshore oil and gas sectors of the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific West Coast, announced the delivery of SPLASH, a Special Purpose Liveboat and Survey Hull to specifically address safety concerns with traditional methods of Liveboating. SPLASH is a purpose built vessel designed to address and mitigate inherent hazards associated with Liveboating. The vessel features twin jet drive propulsion, superior diving capabilities and is based on a shallow-draft catamaran hull and power plant that produces a rugged…

NAVSEA Conducts Flyaway Saturation Dive Training

U.S. Navy's 40 saturation divers. Courtesy USN

For the U.S. Navy's 40 saturation divers, requalification on the Fly Away Saturation Diving System (SATFAD) here this week ensures the Navy retains its deep water recovery capability. The Sailors train on the SATFAD system three to four times a year to retain their qualifications on the unique system that allows these Navy divers to execute missions such as deep ocean salvage, aircraft or black box retrieval. "We train so the procedures become routine, and we're using this opportunity to train now until a real disaster happens…

Divers Lost in Fog as Dive Boat Breaks Down

RNLI lifeboat display Happisburgh: Photo courtesy of RNLI

A UK dive boat’s malfunctioning GPS & engine breakdown were the cause of two divers being lost in fog near the wreck of the ship ‘Alster’. Humber Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre was called by a dive vessel at just after 1530 on a recent summer afternoon. They were told that the vessel’s engine and GPS had broken and it couldn’t find the two divers who were believed to be on the surface in black wets suits and marker buoys. The situation was not helped by thick fog that reduced visibility to 50 metres.

Thomas, Mazzone to Head Naval Shipyards

Vice Adm. Paul Sullivan, commander of Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) announced the appointments of Capt. Gregory R. Maintenance Facility (PHNSY & IMF) in Hawaii, and Capt. Robert W. Maine. Operations Officer. vehicle, LSV-2 Cutthroat. Dynamics Electric Boat. Scientists and Engineers Professional Achievement Award. Conversion and Repair, Newport News, Va. Submarine Project Officer for SUPSHIP Newport News. inactivation of the ex-Narwhal (SSN 671). and deployed surface ships and submarines of the 7th Fleet. Commander Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet, as the maintenance officer. to improve planning and execution of submarine depot availabilities. Award for academic excellence. 2006. from January 2005. Mazzone was promoted to Capt. in November 2004. reported to USS Dwight D.

Arctic Rescue Base Set Up by Rosneft

Russia’s largest oil company is establishing a permanent Arctic base of rescue personnel & divers in Amderma, a village on the Kara Sea coast. The base, which is to support the company’s ongoing exploration activities in the Kara Sea, will include a team of divers and a MI-8 helicopter, the Nenets AO regional administration informs Barents Observer. The divers all come from a special operations team under the Arkhangelsk Regional Rescue Service, the only of its kind in Northwest Russia. All of the men have been part of a four-year special training programme based on experiences from Norway, Sweden, Germany and the United States. In addition to the provision of emergency and rescue services, the base personnel will make regular ice monitoring missions to the areas of the seismic studies.

Sweden Tries To Persuade U.S. Group To Abandon Estonia Dive

Swedish coastguards reportedly planned to board a U.S. ship they suspect is taking divers to examine the wreck of the ferry Estonia, which sank in the Baltic Sea in 1994 with the loss of 852 lives. Sweden strongly opposes but cannot prevent foreign nationals from diving, as it lies in international waters off Finland. American businessman Greg Bemis has said he plans to send divers to investigate reports that the car and passenger ferry might have been damaged in an explosion before it sank in a Baltic storm in September, 1994. Coastguards said the One Eagle vessel owned by Bemis was sighted north of the Danish Baltic island of Bornholm, heading north.

Royal Navy Searches for Lost Bomb

Royal Navy divers are searching for a huge World War Two bomb which has been lost off the Suffolk coast as it was being towed out to sea to be safely detonated, according to a report on www.telegraph.co.uk. The 1,000lb device, thought to be German and dropped in 1942, was washed ashore at Felixstowe, a week ago, and hundreds of homes were evacuated. Bomb disposal experts attached the device to a floating frame to tow it two miles out to sea to destroy it. But strong tides dislodged the bomb and Royal Navy divers have spent six days trying to relocate it.  (Source: www.telegraph.co.uk)

GAC Starts Hull Cleaning Op'ns in Oman

HullWiper in Oman 400

GAC EnvironHull hull cleaning operations using the brush-and-diver-free HullWiper system starting at the port of Sohar, just outside the Gulf of Hormuz. This latest expansion adds Oman to the growing GAC EnvironHull network which already covers Dubai, Fujairah and Sharjah in the UAE, as well as Gothenburg in Sweden. The green hull cleaning solution uses adjustable pressure sea water jets as the cleaning medium rather than brushes or abrasives, resulting in minimal damage to the antifouling surface.

NAVSEA Divers Help Raise History

Naval Sea Systems Command divers, along with National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration divers lifted a piece of naval history out of 240 ft of water off the coast of Cape Hatteras . One hundred forty years after it's sinking, the Union ironclad Monitor is still making headlines. The 30-ton steam engine is once again in the spotlight as a $4.9 million recovery project successfully surfaces with the engine intact. Good weather conditions supported the initial lift of the intact engine. A 90-ton recovery structure was built to bring the engine to the surface. Divers rigged hydraulic hoses to rams and tested their assemblies. Divers verified lift points around the engine and lifted it approximately 24 inches using hydraulic rams at 1930 ft.

NAVSEA Divers Help Raise History

Naval Sea Systems Command divers, along with National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration divers lifted a piece of naval history out of 240 feet of water off the coast of Cape Hatteras Monday. One hundred forty years after it's sinking, the Union ironclad Monitor is still making headlines. The 30-ton steam engine is once again in the spotlight as a $4.9 million recovery project successfully surfaces with the engine intact. Good weather conditions supported the initial lift of the intact engine. A 90-ton recovery structure was built to bring the engine to the surface. Divers rigged hydraulic hoses to rams and tested their assemblies. Divers verified lift points around the engine and lifted it approximately 24 inches using hydraulic rams at 1930 feet.

SubSea Solutions Alliance Provides Quick Fix - Underwater

With offices in key locations at the world's busiest cruise ports, the Subsea Solutions Alliance can be at the scene of an emergency repair on a moment's notice. If a repair happens to be one that requires more diver technicians than are available at one location, additional personnel are then brought in from the other Alliance members. While the relationship between Miami Diver, All-Sea and Trident spans 15 years a formal alliance was not established until earlier this year. According to Kevin Peters president of Miami Diver, there was no doubt in his mind that the alliance would not have been an immediate success. "Because of this venture, we now have more locations and more trained personnel to serve the cruise industry," Peters said.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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