DREDGE Act of 2012 Introduced

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

New Legislation Aimed at Building Wetlands while Deepening Mississippi River in anticipation of Panama Canal Expansion completion.

Congressman Cedric Richmond ha introduced the DREDGE Act of 2012-Dredging for Restoration and Economic Development for Global Exports. The bill would give the Army Corps of Engineers the authorization to dredge the Mississippi River to 50 feet so that larger vessels transiting the expanded Panama Canal can access the River.  In addition, the bill creates a pilot project to promote the rebuilding of wetlands using existing sediment dredged from the River.
 
“The Mississippi River is undoubtedly the most important river in the United States,” said Congressman Richmond. “Its proximity to the Panama Canal is vital to our nation’s economy and critical to supporting the President’s goal of doubling America’s exports. With the introduction of the DREDGE Act of 2012, we are preparing for the future while strengthening our wetland restoration efforts. By deepening the Mississippi River, we continue to remain effective and competitive in the global market while preparing the state of Louisiana to capitalize on an extremely valuable asset, our ports.”
 
In addition to deepening the Mississippi River, the DREDGE Act of 2012 calls for greater accountability concerning sediment disposal from dredging. This legislation directs the Corps to install a pump-out site in the Southwest Pass so that the sediment is no longer wasted and is instead used to rebuild our wetlands.
 
The Environmental Defense Fund, The National Wildlife Federation, and The National Audubon Society issued the following statement:
 
“We agree with Congressman Richmond that the present management of the lower Mississippi River fails to meet the nation's needs for either navigation or restoration. Adequately addressing the changes that are happening in the lower Mississippi River is critical to Louisiana and the nation.  Representative Richmond’s bill illuminates a critical fact – getting sediment out of the river is essential to both navigation and restoration.  Vital studies now underway promise to provide answers that will be necessary to end our dependence on an increasingly more expensive and endless cycle of dredging. In the meantime, beneficial use of the sediment removed from the channel by dredging should be the minimum federal response.”  (Emphasis supplied)
 
“My legislation also creates a pilot project to study the potential cost savings of using sediment dredged to rebuild wetlands instead of simply dumping it in the ocean,” said Congressman Richmond. “Currently, dredges working in the lower Southwest Pass dump sediment, the life blood of our wetlands, into the Gulf of Mexico. Estimates show that by redirecting all of the sediment dredged in the Southwest Pass, we can create approximately 775 acres of wetlands per year.”
 
"Rep. Cedric Richmond should be commended for his vision and leadership in sponsoring legislation to authorize the USACE to dredge the Mississippi River navigation channel where needed to a 50 foot depth,” said Allen Gibbs, President of the Crescent River Port Pilots’ Association. “With the advancement of the RAMP Act legislation, the funds currently collected from the channel users can be used for its intended purpose, channel dredging. Rep. Richmond's legislation will compliment the RAMP Act legislation to provide an opportunity to capitalize on the expansion of the Panama Canal in 2014 to accept larger vessels and deeper draft. In addition, the material removed from the channel deepening project can be used for coastal restoration. This effort will create new jobs, and increase commerce in the state and the nation."
 
The Army Corps of Engineers will also be tasked with reporting to Congress on the cost of the pump-out disposal operation compared to current dredging practices. In addition, the report will state the total amount of material dredged during Operations and Maintenance activities in the New Orleans District and how much material was used beneficially.
 
Not one single port in the Gulf of Mexico and only a handful on the East Coast can currently accept the larger vessels that will start traveling through the expanded Panama Canal. More than 1,800 cargo vessels with a draft of 40 feet or more transit the Mississippi River each year. The five ports on the lower Mississippi River constitute the largest port complex in the world, moving more than 400 million tons of cargo annually. Roughly 60 percent of all U.S. grain exports are shipped via the Lower Mississippi and more than 20 percent of all waterborne commerce in the United States pass through the lower Mississippi River. Current cargo activity within the Port of New Orleans alone generates $2.8 billion in federal taxes each year.
 

Maritime Reporter June 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Ports

Pre-Mooring Safety Inspections at Trieste, Italy

The SIOT/TAL Terminal at Trieste has advised that the TAL Pre-Mooring Safety Inspection program will be modified from 1 September. The checks at road will affect:

MPHRP's Welfare Responder Training in Manila

Few people are as devoted to seafarers’ wellbeing as MPHRP’s partners, which include the members of the International Seafarers Welfare and Assistance Network

Growing American Shipping Bill Introduced by Garamendi

Congressman John Garamendi (D-CA-03), Ranking Member of the House Transportation and Infrastructure’s Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee, informs ot the introduction of  H.

Navigation

General Dynamics gets $25 mi GPS Contract from Lockheed Martin

General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics, was awarded a $25.4 million full-production contract from Lockheed Martin to support the U.

Raytheon Anschütz Debuts ShipGuard at SMM

In view of an increasing demand for security of merchant ships and maritime trade, Raytheon Anschütz, a German-based manufacturer of Integrated Bridge Systems,

House Subcommittee Hearing Highlights “Dismal State” of U.S. Icebreaking Capability

At the July 23, 2014, hearing of the House Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation on “Implementing U.S. Policy in the Arctic” the committee chairman, Rep.

Dredging

LUSCHI Begins Dredging at ArcelorMittal’s Canal

LUSCHI announced today it will mobilize its vessel Giovanella to Espírito Santo to assist in the dredging and final disposal of accumulated sediments in the seawater storage canal of ArcelorMittal,

Rohr Dredge Continues European Expansion

Rohr International Dredge Holdings, Inc. announced that it acquired Eurl Rohr France, including its current backlog, inventory and all associated intellectual property (IPR), on July 23, 2014.

Dredging at Jurong Port, Singapore

Dredging work will be carried out at Keppel Shipyard Benoi Road, off West Jurong Channel, from 28 July to 30 September. As per the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore Port Marine Notice No.

Maritime Safety

Hellfire Missile Firing a First for New Navy Helicopters

The Royal Australian Navy’s newest maritime combat helicopter, the MH-60R Seahawk ‘Romeo’, has successfully fired its first ‘Hellfire’ missile in the United States.

USCG Cutter Waesche Home from RIMPAC Exercises

The Coast Guard Cutter Waesche has returned to port at Coast Guard Base Honolulu, after spending three weeks at sea participating in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014 exercises,

UN Places Sanctions against North Korean Shippers

The United Nations Security Council has imposed sanctions on the North Korean shippers that operate the vessel Chong Chon Gang, seized by Panama in July 2013 for

Government Update

FERC Approves Freeport LNG Export Project

U.S. federal regulators on Wednesday approved construction of Freeport LNG Development LP's liquefied natural gas export project in Texas. Freeport is the third U.

Kurdish Crude Lightered, Destination Unknown

Part of a Kurdish oil cargo has been offloaded from a Greek-managed tanker into another tanker in the South China Sea, but mystery surrounds the identity of the

Admiral on U.S. Navy & Asia Pacific Re-balancing Act

The commander of U.S. Pacific Command has briefed Pentagon reporters, discussing the U.S. rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region, successful engagement with partners

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2923 sec (3 req/sec)