Marine Link
Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Bee Paradise in the Rotterdam Port Area

Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.

July 17, 2018

Photo: Willem van Kasteren (HbR), Port of Rotterdam Authority

Photo: Willem van Kasteren (HbR), Port of Rotterdam Authority

 The Port of Rotterdam Authority has had a swarm of bees placed on the Maasvlakte in the verge next to the Stenen Baakplein. In this section of the Honey Highway, ten thousand bees will soon be collecting pollen and nectar.  

The goal of this initiative is the conservation of the original Dutch honey bee by reintroducing it to this region.
 
The Honey Highway is now in full bloom. The flowers - planted last year by primary school children from Brielle - can be admired by motorists driving past on the A15. If they look in the other direction, they can enjoy a view of a flower bed several kilometres long. 
 
The flower bed features flowers such as the Evening Primrose and Viper’s Bugloss that sprouted up spontaneously along the pipeline corridors. “This sea of flowers is in line with our policy for sustainable development of the port. We specifically focus on and create extra room for bees,” said Ronald Paul, COO of the Port of Rotterdam Authority.
 
This is the first time the Port Authority has placed a bee colony in the port area. Beekeeper Anne Bac from Oostvoorne will be responsible for taking care of the bees. She will do this using a biodynamic approach to beekeeping that will result in a hardy bee species. In July she will be giving tours to people from Oostvoorne and Brielle and to employees of port-based businesses. 
 
“Something that is both necessary and fun,” says Deborah Post, the initiator of the Honey Highway. “The 5,000 square metres of perennial flowers at the Stenen Baakplein and the flowering shrubs in the Geuzebos should provide sufficient pollen and nectar for the bees to comfortably make it through the winter. The bees are able to fly up to seven kilometres so they can also reach Oostvoorne.”
 
The Honey Highway was launched as an initiative of the Port Authority in cooperation with Deborah. “While the bees may be minuscule creatures in the vastness of the port area with its enormous ships and stacks of containers, they are also extremely important,” says Jan Putters, Asset Manager at the Port of Rotterdam Authority.
 
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