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Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Acadia News

Veteran Nova Scotia Ferry to be Replaced

MV Princess of Acadia: Photo credit Wiki CCL

Government of Canada to invest in replacement of 'MV Princess of Acadia' for Digby to Saint John ferry service. The Honourable Peter MacKay, Minister of National Defence and Member of Parliament for Central Nova; Greg Kerr, Member of Parliament for West Nova; and Rodney Weston, Member of Parliament for Saint John, have announced that the Government of Canada will invest in a replacement vessel for the federally-owned MV Princess of Acadia. Travelling the 70 kilometres between Digby…

Decommissioned Navy Ship as a Homeless Shelter?

According to an AP report, if a Hawaii group has its way, retired Navy ships -- often used as museums, for training purposes or simply as scrap metal -- may have a new lease on life: as homeless shelters. The 642-ft destroyer tender Acadia was built in 1981 and sailed around the world several times with a crew of 1,500 before it was decommissioned in 1994. In January, Navy officials decided to dispose of, sell off or give away the vessel, which is docked at Pearl Harbor. Citing Hawaii's relatively tight land resources, a director of the Victory Ohana Prison Fellowship reportedly told The Honolulu Advertiser that Hawaii has to think outside of the box. A coalition of called the Acadia Acquisition Committee is reportedly negotiating with the state for a place to put the ship.

Plaquemine Ferry Runs 17-Car Vessel

On Feb. 11, the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) announced that the 35-car M/V Acadia was taken out of service at the Plaquemine ferry landing because of a broken rudder. The M/V Acadia was taken to the shipyard and replaced with the smaller 17-car M/V Feliciana. Vehicle restrictions for the smaller vessel are: no trailers, no more than two axles, and no more than six wheels. Large trucks and trailers should use the Interstate 10 Mississippi River Bridge. The operating hours for the Plaquemine ferry are 5 a.m. - 9 p.m. seven days a week. Before traveling, drivers should call the Ferry Toll-Free Information line at 1-888-613-3779 for the status of the ferry, or visit the “Ferry Status” page on the right-hand side of the DOTD Web site. (www.dotd.la.gov)

Grant for Cleaner Ferry Engines

The DEQ’s grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will help retrofit two of DOTD’s ferry boats – the M/V Acadia, which operates at the Plaquemines crossing, and the M/V St. Francisville, which operates at the St Francisville/New Roads crossing. This is the first step in re-powering DOTD ferries with new cleaner running engines. DOTD plans to re-power other vessels in the future as additional funding becomes available.

Maintenance Woes Led to Digby Ferry Grounding

Maintenance deficiencies and lack of adequate emergency procedures led to the November 7, 2013 loss of electrical power and grounding of the passenger ferry Princess of Acadia in Digby, Nova Scotia, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found in its report, M13M0287. The incident caused no injuries or pollution. According to TSB, Princess of Acadia was approaching the ferry terminal at Digby, Nova Scotia with 87 passengers and crew aboard. In preparation for docking, as the bow thruster was started, the main generator blacked out causing a loss of electrical power and disabling the main propeller pitch control pumps. Once the pitch control pumps stopped…

Negligent Homicide with Yacht Leads to Loss of Coverage

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit ruled that, where the owner of a yacht was convicted of negligent homicide in connection with a fatal collision, the insurance company is not obligated to defend under a policy excluding losses “criminally caused or incurred” by the insured. In the instant case, plaintiff was operating his yacht when it collided with another boat, killing one of the passengers of the boat. He was convicted of negligent homicide for failing to keep a proper lookout. Plaintiff was also sued for wrongful death by the widow and executrix of the deceased. Plaintiff sought declaratory judgment that his yacht insurance company was obligated to defend the wrongful death action.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 5

Today in U.S. 1923 - U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders Navy to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of eastern United States. 1946 - USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42) and four escorts visit Greece to underscore U.S. support for the Greek Government which faced a Communist insurgency. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.

Bay of Fundy Ferry Service to End

Bay Ferries Ltd. announced on June 30 that the Princess of Acadia will make its final three-hour trip between Digby and Saint John, N.B., on Oct. 31.High fuel prices and declining tourist and commercial traffic were among factors in the decision, the company said in a news release. Local government officials are working together to find a way to maintain the area’s ferry service. Many officials are expected to travel to Halifax for talks with cabinet ministers and, possibly, the premier, with the hope that the Bay Ferries decision can be reversed if there is some financial help from the federal government. At the legislature, Premier Rodney MacDonald said the government is playing an active role in finding a solution, although that won’t include an operating subsidy from taxpayers.

This Day in Naval History - Sept. 05

From the Navy News Service 1775 - Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers. 1813 - USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off . 1918 - USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off . 1923 - U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at , to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders Navy to form a neutrality patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of eastern . 1946 - USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB 42) and four escorts visit to underscore support for the Greek government, which faced a communist insurgency. 1990 - USS Acadia (AD 42) departs for first war-time deployment of mixed gender crew on combat vessel.  

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 5

USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. 1923 - U.S. Asiatic Fleet arrives at Yokohama, Japan, to provide medical assistance and supplies after Kondo Plain earthquake. 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders Navy to form a Neutrality Patrol to report the presence of foreign warships within 300 miles of eastern United States. 1946 - USS Franklin Delano Roosevelt (CVB-42) and four escorts visit Greece to underscore U.S. support for the Greek Government which faced a Communist insurgency. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

Guascor Engines Make Serious Inroads

Guascor Inc, a manufacturer of diesel and gas engines, power systems and marine reduction gears based in Northern Spain and distributed throughout the Southeastern United States by Reagan Equipment Company, Inc. has accumulated a number of interesting references in the past six months, installations that should go a long way in extending the brand to users throughout the country. For the Louisiana Department of Transportation's Ferry Division, Guascor supplied a pair of SF 180 TAs for the repower and repair of the 30-year-old ferryboat, M/V Acadia. M/V Acadia has a busy work life, crossing the Mississippi River at State Route 75 in Plaquemine, LA, every half-hour, 16 hours a day, seven days a week carrying up to 35 cars per trip.

U.S. Coast Guard Warns of Hurricane Earl

A crew from Coast Guard Station Curtis Bay, Md., trailers a 25-foot Response Boat-Small from the water to ensure its safety until the effects of Hurricane Earl are over in the upper Chesapeake Bay, Sept. 2, 2010. Prior to the hurricane impact, Coast Guard crews conducted harbor patrols to notify mariners of the possible danger and how to best prepare for it. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Brandyn Hill.

As Hurricane Earl approaches New England, the Coast Guard is actively tracking the storm’s progress and urging caution and preparedness for mariners and storm watchers. Hurricane force winds, heavy surf, strong storm surges, rogue waves, rip currents and coastal flooding are predicted. Rogue waves near break walls and jetties are particularly hazardous to beach-goers during hurricane conditions. Sudden large waves can easily sweep storm watchers into the water or drag vessels off moorings or piers.

Canada Commits $51.9 Mln to Ferry Services

MV Fundy Rose (Photo: Bay Ferries Ltd.)

The Canadian Government has committed $51.9 million to support Atlantic Canada ferry services, announced Canada’s Transport Minister Marc Garneau. The funding, announced as part of Budget 2016, will support operations, maintain and repair ferry assets and dispose of the MV Princess of Acadia, which was taken out of service in July 2015 and replaced by the MV Fundy Rose. The funding has enabled the one year extension of contracts for interprovincial ferry services in Atlantic Canada…

M/V Ascension to Undergo Maintenance

Ferry service at the Plaquemine/Sunshine crossing will change tomorrow when the 45-car ferry M/V Ascension goes to the shipyard for a mandatory five-year hull examination and is expected to be out of service for four months. The Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) will continue service using the 17-car ferry M/V Iberville. DOTD expects a second 17-car ferry, the M/V Feliciana, to return to service later next week. Once this second ferry returns to service, DOTD will run both 17-car ferries during peak travel hours at the Plaquemine/Sunshine crossing. The peak travel hours will be 5:15 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Vehicle restrictions for the 17-car ferries are no trailers, no more than two axles, and no more than six wheels.

Bay Ferries Thrown a Lifeline

According to reports, Ottawa and the province of Nova Scotia will hand over a combined $6m to keep the vital Bay of Fundy cargo ferry service afloat. Nova Scotia Premier Rodney MacDonald announced a $2m lifeline to Bay Ferries Ltd. in order to keep the Digby-Saint John cargo service operating, reports the Halifax Chronicle Herald. That's on top of the $4 million Ottawa says it will kick-in. New Brunswick is also expected to contribute. The government money is a short-term solution to keep the ferry sailing while a long-term solution is developed, MacDonald added. In July, Bay Ferries announced skyrocketing fuel costs, a drop in tourism and forestry exports, were forcing the company to anchor its service permanently.

Vessels: Of Christenings, Cajuns and Crawfish

Of all the Cajun customs in south Louisiana, boat Christenings go back, way back to shortly after the Cajuns arrived from Acadia in Canada in the 1700's. The pursuit of food during these early hard years revolved around the bountiful rivers and streams that were full of fish, but also oysters and shellfish, mostly shrimp and crawfish. Even though these early boats were little more than small wooden canoes, made of plentiful cypress, the Cajuns were a religious people, so boat blessings and Christenings were common. Now, fast forward to March 10, 2004 on the banks of Bayou Teche at Breaux Brothers Enterprises shipyard in Loreauville, La. Breaux Brothers is a major builder of aluminum crew/supply boats in the 150-165 ft. range.

Legal Notes

President George Bush has signed into law legislation repealing a four year old rule imposing a 50% duty on the cost of routine repairs and maintenance carried out by U.S. merchant mariners while their vessel is at sea. The elimination of the duty, which customs authorities have levied on US-flag carriers since April 2001, represents a victory for the domestic shipowning community. The community has lobbied hard against it since its introduction. President Bush signed into law the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (S. 2845). The major emphasis of the legislation is reform of the U.S. intelligence organization. Other measures, though, may impact the maritime community.

Maritime Pilots Recognized with IMO Bravery Accolade

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Two maritime pilots who defied fire to bring a burning ship to safety, averting a major maritime catastrophe, received the 2017 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea during the 2017 IMO awards ceremony, held on Monday (27 November). Pilots Captain Michael G. McGee and Captain Michael C. Phillips, from Houston, United States, were recognized for their role in averting a major tragedy in September 2016. The ship they were piloting, the 247 meters-long tanker Aframax River, broke…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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