Airline Industry News

27 Aug 2019

Shipbuilding: Norway’s Fjellstrand Rewrites the Book

“We see that several car types are built on the same platform and see that there is a benefit in the cost within that industry. We have no reason to believe that this should not be the case also within the maritime industry.” said Fjellstrand’s head of research and development, Edmund Tolo. Photo courtesy Fjellstrand

As maritime digests a number of historical changes, Norway’s Fjellstrand shipyard wants to put aside the rule book and look at the whole process in a new way, reducing engineering costs up to 70% and production costs up to 20%.The process of designing and building a ship, even in today’s highly standardized mass manufacturing environment, remains largely a one-off, one-of-a-kind design and build. Ships are most often built to a shipowner’s or operator’s specific requirements, which are often based on fixed parameters such as speed…

09 Jul 2019

Ship IoT Tech Enables Navigation Safety

Hans Ottosen, CEO, Danelec

The airline industry has long employed flight data to monitor navigational and operational practices for evaluation and feedback to pilots using a system called Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA). Now a similar concept is coming into the shipping industry. Danelec Marine, a well-known manufacturer of VDRs and ECDIS products, this month unveiled a new Bridge Operational Quality Assurance (BOQA) system. To learn more, we talked with Hans Ottosen, CEO of Danelec, a Danish…

15 Mar 2019

Shipbuilding: Rewriting the Book

Photo Courtesy: Fjellstrand

As maritime digests a number of historical changes, Norway’s Fjellstrand shipyard wants to put aside the rule book and look at the whole process in a new way, reducing engineering costs up to 70% and production costs up to 20%.The process of designing and building a ship, even in today’s highly standardized mass manufacturing environment, remains largely a one-off, one-of-a-kind design and build. Ships are most often built to a shipowner’s or operator’s specific requirements, which are often based on fixed parameters such as speed…

05 Mar 2019

DFDS CEO Steps Down

(L-R) Niels Smedegaard, Torben Carlsen. Photos: DFDS

Danish international shipping and logistics company DFDS said that Niels Smedegaard, longtime CEO, will step down by the end of April. Current CFO Torben Carlsen will take over as new CEO.In close partnership with Niels Smedegaard, Torben Carlsen has been in-strumental in making DFDS a larger, stronger and more profitable company and will thus contribute to ensuring continuity in the development and op-eration of the company.Niels Smedegaard has been CEO of DFDS since 1 January 2007.Niels said: “My time at DFDS has been a fantastic journey…

28 Sep 2017

ABB Digitalizes Maritime Maintenance

Main dashboard (Photo: ABB)

ABB has added ‘Fleet Intelligence’ to its ABB Ability Collaborative Operations software, providing marine customers with a single and complete overview of their ship system maintenance needs rather than being faced with piecemeal, standalone reporting solutions. Fleet Intelligence addresses a common shortcoming in ship efficiency, where data from manufacturer manuals provide the basis for the planned maintenance system, meaning that equipment is maintained to standards set by vendors rather than being based on the needs of customers.

02 Jun 2017

Human Failure Affecting Shipping Safety Performance

© Sergii Figurnyi / Adobe Stock

Data from maritime safety specialist Propel shows huge potential to reduce risk of serious accidents. “Human failure tops the agenda of many companies though few know how to address it in a proper way. Collaboration, trust and engagement of all personnel -ship and shore- are vital to reduce major accidents. The whole industry needs to change its focus when it comes to improving maritime safety,” said Benedikte Wentworth, CEO of Propel. According to Propel, despite the continuing downward trend in total vessel losses…

31 Mar 2017

Simulation: CSMART

(Photo: CSMART)

While much of the maritime world slumps, the cruise sector is enjoying its most vibrant growth in a generation. Carnival Corporation, in particular, is doing very well as its financial performance is stronger than ever, with 2016 delivering the best year of earnings in company history. The company’s adjusted earnings for 2016 of $2.6 billion is the best annual financial performance in its 44-year history. With that, Hans Hederstrom, Managing Director give overview of CSMART, one of the newest and richly appointed simulation centers on the planet.

01 Mar 2016

Report Calls for Shipping Liners to Consolidate

Image: Maersk Line

The need of the hour is consolidation of container ship lines order to regain profitability and to overcome financial struggles, consulting firm AlixPartners says in a new report. The report says that an increased supply of vessels, coupled with the introduction of giant ships, had met with a dwindling demand in the second half of last year resulting to overcapacity, low profitability and reduced cash flow. The shippers with “M&A on their minds need to be proactive” if they hope…

25 Feb 2016

Simple Steps to Futureproof the Shipping Industry

Panel of speakers

Senior decision makers from all sectors of the shipping industry met in Hamburg yesterday to hear some of the leaders in the digital revolution debate the opportunities and threats faced by the industry today. Although operating in many different fields, their conclusion was startlingly clear. To navigate successfully and profitably in the digital age, ship operators must go back to basics, steering a clear course through the data explosion to harness the benefits of the new technologies whilst avoiding their pitfalls.

08 Feb 2016

Shipping Line Consolidation: What Did the Airlines Do?

Image: Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer

The container shipping industry is faced with the challenge of ever-decreasing freight rates that can only be served viably with larger, more efficient vessels. This problem is worsened by the industry’s average financial performance which does not generate the returns to invest in this new capacity without considerable financial risk. There are only two alternatives: either an all-out battle for market share in the hope that several lines simply abandon a particular trade or even exit the market completely allowing the surviving lines to capture the volumes freed up by these departing lines…

26 Oct 2015

Unmanned Vessels: The Future is Now

Norway’s unmanned 100 TEU coastal marine transportation system ReVolt is to be powered by a 3,000kWh battery to provide a range of 100 nautical miles. With no crew onboard DNV GL has estimated a total saving of up to $34 million over its estimated 30 years time in service.

There is a global boom in the development of unmanned systems, from below the ocean’s surface to high in the sky to the world’s roads. Add to this list the maritime industry, on both military and civilian vessels. Maritime Reporter & Engineering News examines in depth recent developments taking place in Europe to discover general thoughts and technical trends driving the future of unmanned shipping. The joint European Research Project MUNIN was finalized in August 2015, a project…

28 May 2015

Suppression of Random Drug Test Results: A Bad and Unnecessary Decision

Lee Seham

Last September, an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) unsettled much of the U.S. maritime industry when he dismissed with prejudice a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) action to revoke a Merchant Mariner’s Credential (MMC) despite his finding that the mariner’s urine had tested positive for cocaine. The case is referred to as USCG v. Hopper, SR-2014-14. American Maritime Safety, Inc. (AMS) considered the Hopper outcome to be a bad decision, both because it imposes harsh evidentiary consequences…

23 Dec 2014

Making Stop Work Authority Work

It is one thing to have a policy posted. It is another to review and explain such a policy to a new crew during their orientation or when they first sign on a vessel. And, finally, it is still another to claim the policy has been effectively implemented. A number of recent maritime incidents have led to ‘Stop Work Authority’ (SWA) becoming a federally mandated part of a safety management system (SMS) for vessels operating in certain areas and industries. Other sectors, while not federally mandated with respect to this requirement, adopted and implemented SWA years ago, on their own. SWA, far from a new concept, is one that recognizes the importance attached to encouraging any employee on board a vessel (whether licensed…

21 Jul 2014

Containership Consortia Set for Further Expansion: Analyst

Vessels Sailing from Asia to Europe also carry cargo for many other destinations: Map DMR

The formation of 2M is only the conclusion of the latest round of mega-alliance negotiations. Ocean carriers are clearly not yet done with mega-alliance expansion following China’s rejection of P3. Maersk and MSC’s subsequent 2M agreement is only the latest. Evergreen and the CKYH alliance are still talking to the US’ Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) about extending the scope of their operating agreement between Asia and Europe to include the US, and CMA CGM has yet to clarify who its new partners will be.

02 Jul 2014

INSIGHTS Focus: Robert Kunkel Talks Power and Propulsion

Those MarineNews readers who are not familiar with Bob Kunkel probably should be. That’s because Kunkel, President of Alternative Marine Technologies, previously served as the Federal Chairman of the Short Sea Shipping Cooperative Program under the Maritime Administration and Department of Transportation from 2003 until 2008. He is a past Vice President of the Connecticut Maritime Association, a contributing writer for many maritime and technical trades publications, including Maritime Professional Magazine and MarineNews.

06 Jun 2014

France to host airshow-style nuclear exhibition

France's Oldest Nuclear Reactor

France hopes to boost its nuclear industry with a biennial exhibition modeled on the Paris Air Show, although it does not expect reactor orders to pile up as fast as airplane contracts. To be held in the same Le Bourget venue as the airshow, the October 14-16 World Nuclear Exhibition (WNE) expects some 7,000 visitors will visit stands representing nearly 500 French and foreign nuclear industry companies, the organisers said on Thursday. "Obviously, it would be an illusion to expect to sign as many nuclear reactor contracts there as the airline industry does at the airshow…

19 Jun 2013

Breaking Down The Cost of MARPOL

Since January 8, 2009, United States (U.S.) and foreign flagged ships operating in the waters of the U.S. have been subject to MARPOL Annex VI. The Marine Environmental Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted amendments to Annex VI and the nitrogen oxides (NOx) Technical Code, collectively referred to as Annex VI (Revised). Annex VI (Revised) entered into force on July 1, 2010. These amendments include significant and progressive limits for sulfur oxide (SOx) and NOx emissions from marine engines and for the first time addressed emissions of Particulate Matter (PM). The amendments replaced the SOx Emissions Control Areas (SECA) by introducing the concept of Emission Control Areas (ECA) for SOx, NOx, and PM.

02 Oct 2012

3D Vessel Tracking: A New Course in Port Traffic Control

Marine operators and entities have long struggled with the most efficient, effective means to monitor and manage traffic in increasingly busy ports around the world. The marine industry, unlike the airline industry, is unique in that mixed with high levels of commercial traffic is a broad and ever changing mix of personal watercraft of varying sizes, with equal variables in terms of operator experience. Thus the ability to rapidly collect, compute, disseminate and act on information is central to safe port operations. A U.K.

13 Apr 2009

Holding Your Breath

Ship Tracks South of , a satellite image acquired by NASA on March 4, 2009. On March 4, 2009, the skies over the northeast were streaked with clouds that form around the particles in ship exhaust. This pair of images shows how these ship tracks are different from the natural marine clouds in the same area. The top image is a natural-color (photo-like) view of the ship tracks. The image below reveals more information than a picture: it shows the size of the cloud droplets. Both…

26 Nov 2001

ExxonMobil: Bunker demand will recover quickly

September 11 attacks on the United States, will soon recover. Writing in the latest issue of HorsePower, the EMMF newsletter, Joe Rud, GM of fleet purchasing, business development and e-commerce, said, "Volumes have dropped, but not by anything like the 20 percent hit the airline industry has taken. Prices are down too, as the price of a barrel of oil has fallen into the low twenty-dollar range. But EMMF has taken specific action to improve security and to maintain customer relationships, and believes that demand will soon recover. "In the current climate, everyone has become more security-conscious. EMMF has focused on its points of interaction with customers.

08 Mar 2004

Column: When Security is Made Simple

How are we to implement an effective Maritime Security Program? When terrorists hijacked aircraft and used them as weapons, a significant paradigm shift occurred in how we view security in the U.S. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created and we were witnesses to the largest shift in federal government roles and responsibilities since World War II. Additionally, significant changes were made to the airline and maritime industries with the implementation of the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (MTSA) and its aviation counterpart. This article will discuss methodologies to assist maritime owners/operators in complying with the often confusing myriad of federal and international laws and regulations. According to the U.S.

24 Jan 2002

Security: Planning is key to Prevention

News travels around the world at the speed of light. A violent terrorist act at sea seen by millions could cause irreparable damage to the reputation of a major cruise line, if not the entire industry. Maritime Terrorism and piracy rose 40 percent last year, and by the end of the first quarter of 2000, the International Maritime Bureau reported 130 acts of piracy. The intensity of these attacks ranged from simple theft to attacks conducted with mortars, grenade launchers, and machine guns. Many countries lack the financial resources necessary to provide naval protection against piracy and terrorist acts at sea. Because of this lack of protection, the shipping industry must implement preventive measures and adequate training for crewmembers.

24 Jan 2002

The Threat Is Real

One can only be troubled by the fact that there was at least one confirmed American fighting for the Al Qaeda. This young American, John Walker, was attending an Islamic school in or near Saudi Arabia when he became embroiled in the Al Qaeda (probably with his classmates). This means the extremist Islamic teachings that build terrorist mentality are not just in the Madrasus of poor Pakistan but are located in middle and upper class locales of Saudi Arabia and elsewhere in the Islamic world. The arrest in October of Armed Farid Rizk in a well appointed intermodal container bound for Canada must give one pause. The container was equipped with satellite phone, laptop computer and all the comforts of home. He had credentials giving access to airports in Canada, Egypt and Thailand.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2019 - Great Ships of 2019

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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