Cape Kennedy News

26 Sep 2014

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26

USS Ranger (CV-4). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1931 - Keel laying at Newport News, Va. 1963 - First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.

27 Jan 2014

Today in U.S. Naval History: January 27

USS Gudgeon (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - January 27 1942 - USS Gudgeon is first U.S. sub to sink enemy submarine in action, Japanese I-173. 1945 - Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after women member of U.S. Navy. 1967 - Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot Lt. Cdr. Roger B. Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 - Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

08 Oct 2013

Remembering an Industry Icon

Paul B. When Paul B. Candies passed away suddenly on July 21, 2013, the lifelong resident of Des Allemands, LA left behind a prolific, enormously accomplished family and one of the most well-respected marine services and vessel operations firms on the planet. His passing also opened our eyes to the breadth and depth of an individual whose influence and impact extended far beyond the sometimes insular world of maritime commerce. Fitting far more into his time here on earth than others living much longer…

26 Sep 2013

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26

USS Ranger (CV-4) launched at Newport News (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.)

Today in U.S. 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1931 - Keel laying at Newport News, Va. 1963 - First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

10 Nov 2011

Seafarer Heroism Honored at AOTOS Event

Presenters: Rear Admiral Mark Buzby, USN Commander of Military Sealift Command,The Honorable Helen Delich Bentley, David Matsuda, U.S. Maritime Administrator

Five separate episodes of heroism and bravery on the high seas were recognized at the 42nd annual United Seamen's Service Admiral of the Ocean Sea (AOTOS) dinner. The AOTOS event itself honored James L. Henry, Chairman and President of the Transportation Institute; General Duncan J. McNabb, USAF, former Commander, U.S. Transportation Command; and Robert D. Somerville, Chairman of ABS (formerly the American Bureau of Shipping). The maritime industry's most prestigious awards since…

26 Sep 2011

This Day in Naval History – September 26

1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, VA 1910 - First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department organization 1918 - USCGC Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German submarine 1931 - Keel laying at Newport News, VA of USS Ranger (CV-4), first ship designed and constructed as an aircraft carrier 1963 - First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, FL (now Cape Kennedy) from USS Observation Island (EAG-154)

20 Apr 2011

Disposal of Chemical Weapons at Sea

While World War II is well-known as the beginning of the age of atomic weapons, World War I is lesser-known as dawn of the age of chemical weapons. The 1914-1918 conflict saw development and large-scale production of mustard gas, lewisite, and other chemical agents specially designed and packaged for use in armed conflict. With the armistice ending the War to End All Wars, large quantities of this material was left with no place to go. The technology to safely destroy these chemical weapons did not exist and public concern over its existence was largely nil. Without giving the matter much thought, the victorious Allies took much of the surplus chemical weapons out to sea and dumped it overboard.

27 Jan 2011

This Day in U.S. Naval History – January 27

1942 - USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine in action, Japanese I-173. 1945 - Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after women member of U.S. Navy. 1967 - Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot LCDR Roger B. Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 - Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War (Source: Navy News Service)

03 Aug 2010

This Day in Naval History – August 3

1942 - Mildred McAffee (Horton) becomes the first woman officer commissioned into Naval Reserve. 1958 - USS Nautilus (SSN-571) is first ship to reach the geographic North Pole submerged.

26 Jan 2010

This Day in Naval History – Jan. 27

1942 - USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine in action, Japanese I-173. 1945 - Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after women member of U.S. Navy. 1967 - Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot LCDR Roger B. Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 - Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War (Source: Navy News Service)

02 Aug 2009

This Day in Naval History – August 3

1942 - Mildred McAffee (Horton) becomes the first woman officer commissioned into Naval Reserve. 1958 - USS Nautilus (SSN-571) is first ship to reach the geographic North Pole submerged.

27 Jan 2009

This Day in Naval History – Jan. 27

1942 - USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine in action, Japanese I-173. 1945 - Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after women member of U.S. Navy. 1967 - Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot LCDR Roger B. Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 - Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War

26 Sep 2008

This Day in Naval History - Sept. 26

From the Navy News Service 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 - First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department organization. 1918 - USS Tampa lost with 118. 1931 - Keel laying at Newport News, Va., of USS Ranger (CV 4), first ship designed and constructed as an aircraft carrier. 1963 - First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla., (now Cape Kennedy) from USS Observation Island (EAG 154).

05 Dec 2001

Merchant Marine Highlighted in D-Day Museum Activities in New Orleans

The vital role of the American merchant marine during World War II will be highlighted in New Orleans this week during events marking the first major expansion of the National D-Day Museum. Merchant marine veterans will participate in a parade and other events honoring the men and women who fought for victory during World War II. In addition, a modern cargo ship, which stands at ready to support today's armed forces will be open for tours. Maintained by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Maritime Administration, the Ready Reserve Force ship CAPE KENNEDY, like its World War II predecessors, is crewed by merchant mariners. The bands of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and the State University of New York Maritime Academy will participate in the December 7 parade in downtown New Orleans.

06 Dec 2001

Schubert To Be Sworn In As Maritime Administrator

William Grant Schubert, confirmed by the Senate last week as U.S. Maritime Administrator, will be sworn into office today on board the S.S. CAPE KENNEDY, berthed at the Erato Street wharf in New Orleans, LA. Administration officers at Schubert’s level are customarily sworn into office in Washington. Schubert said, “I can think of no more appropriate place to be sworn in than on board a working ship in a busy American port.” Schubert is in New Orleans as part of the D-Day Museum’s celebrations marking the anniversary of the American entry into World War II. This year’s celebrations highlight the contribution of the Merchant Marine. The Maritime Administration’s responsibilities include strengthening and improving the U.S. Merchant Marine.

21 Jun 2002

Coast Guard Responds To Vessel Allision

Coast Guard personnel are responding to a vessel allision near the Poland Avenue Wharf at mile marker 92 on the Mississippi River. The motor vessel Genmar Constantine, a 757-ft. Liberian-flagged tanker carrying crude oil, allided with the USNS Cape Kennedy, a Naval cargo ship at approximately 7 a.m today.A Coast Guard 41-ft. rescue boat from Station New Orleans, an HH-65 Dolphin rescue helicopter crew from Air Station New Orleans, and personnel from Marine Safety Office New Orleans are responding to the accident. The Cape Kennedy was moored beside the USNS Cape Knox near the Marine Forces Reserve building at the time of the accident. The Genmar Constantine was moored to the Cape Kennedy shortly after the accident. The river is open to vessel traffic.

06 Mar 2006

MarAd Ends Hurricane Relief Effort

The Training Ship Empire State left New Orleans on Friday, March 3, marking the end of an unprecedented six-month mission for the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MarAd). Ten of the agency’s ships were activated to aid in recovery and relief efforts in Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This marked the first time the ships of MARAD’s Ready Reserve Force were activated at the request of the Secretary of Transportation to deal with a domestic emergency, and the first time training ships provided by MARAD to State maritime academies were pressed into service to provide food and shelter. Six ships of the Ready Reserve Force: Cape Kennedy…

06 Sep 2005

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Requests to Use RRF

New ships and oil trucks will soon be joining the planes, trains, buses and trucks involved in the massive operation to bring supplies into areas ravaged by Hurricane Katrina, Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta said today. The announcement comes as the historic airlift operation at the New Orleans Airport continues to evacuate thousands of residents from the region. Secretary Mineta became the first head of the Department of Transportation in history to request the Department of Defense to release vessels in the U.S. Ready Reserve Fleet for service moving supplies and personnel into the region and people out. The Empire State, Sirius, State of Maine, Wright and Diamond State are ready to set sail. The Cape Kennedy and Cape Knox are already in New Orleans.

16 Sep 2005

Fed Funds Gets NOLA Transport Rolling

U.S. Transportation Secretary Norman Y. Mineta traveled to New Orleans to announce the first installment of federal funding and the deployment of additional resources to repair damage inflicted by Hurricane Katrina on the area’s transportation systems. “I want the people of New Orleans to know that we are going to help you rebuild, and that includes repairing damaged transportation systems so New Orleans can get moving again,” Secretary Mineta said. Secretary Mineta visited Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport and announced a grant of $15.2 million to repair and rebuild the airport’s airfield lighting, fencing and other security systems damaged by the hurricane.

13 Sep 2005

MARAD Ships Help in Hurricane Recovery

Eight ships from MARAD’s National Defense Reserve Fleet are serving in the national effort to recover from Hurricane Katrina. Two Ready Reserve Force ships have stood firm in New Orleans, their home port. The Cape Kennedy has provided office space for the operations of the Port of New Orleans; the Cape Knox has supported that effort, and is now fully crewed and ready to sail to support cleanup efforts. Three state maritime academy training ships will provide housing and support for port workers and petroleum industry workers, and three more Ready Reserve Force ships will help underpin the area’s economic recovery. The crane ship Diamond State is in New Orleans; the crane ship Equality State will sail on Tuesday for Gulfport, MS; both aim to help restore the cities’ port operations.

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