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Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Exxon Valdez News

Banning of Exxon Valdez Upheld

The U.S. William Sound any tank vessel that, after March 22, 1989, spilled more than 1 million gallons of oil is constitutional. The Exxon Valdez spilled approximately 11 million gallons of oil when it grounded in Prince William Sound on March 23, 1989. The statute effectively banned the Exxon Valdez from engaging in the only trade for which it was constructed. The tanker owner sued the federal government, arguing, among other things, that the statute was an unconstitutional bill of attainder. The court upheld the statute, finding that it was not a bill of attainder because other vessels (albeit none in the U.S. trade) were potentially impacted by the statute. perspective, considered an illegal punishment of its owner (objects, such as ships, have no constitutional rights).

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Exxon Valdez Appeal

The US Supreme Court issued an order granting the petition for a writ of certiorari in the case of Exxon Shipping Co. v. Baker and denying certiorari in the cross-petition of Baker v. Exxon Shipping Co. The Court has agreed to hear argument on and decide three issues: (1) whether Exxon is liable in punitive damages for the actions of the master of the EXXON VALDEZ; (2) whether the penalty provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act preempt judge-made punitive damages for the same conduct; and (3) what are the appropriate standards for awarding punitive damages under general maritime law. Briefs filed with the Court in favor of or opposed to granting the writ of certiorari are available at Exxon Valdez Supreme Court Filings. [Source: HK Law]

Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council

The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, sponsored by the Department of the Interior, will meet in Anchorage, Alaska on December 3-4, 2002. Among the items on the agenda is a review of lingering oil damage. Source: HK Law

Alyeska Head Touts Post-Exxon Valdez Spill Reforms

A decade after the Exxon Valdez disaster, Alyeska Pipeline Service Co., the operator of the trans-Alaska pipeline, has made dramatic reforms in its oil-spill prevention and response programs, according to the head of the company. "We're not the company that we were 10 years ago," Bob Malone, president of Alyeska Pipeline Service Co., told the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce. Alyeska, the operator of the 795 mile pipeline and the Valdez marine terminal where tankers are loaded with crude oil, was criticized for an inadequate and disorganized response to the March 24, 1989 grounding that caused the nation's worst oil spill. But Alyeska has since installed extensive programs to respond to tanker emergencies.

This Day in U.S. Naval History - April 14

1898 - Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace   1969 - North Korean aircraft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan   1988 - USS Samuel B. Roberts struck Iranian mine off Qatar   1989 - First Navy ship arrives on scene to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup   (Source: Navy News Service)  

This Day in Naval History – April 14

1898 - Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace 1969 - North Korean aircraft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan 1988 - USS Samuel B. Roberts struck Iranian mine off Qatar 1989 - First Navy ship arrives on scene to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup (Source: Navy News Service)

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 14

The damaged hull of USS Samuel B. Roberts (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 14 1898 - Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace 1969 - North Korean aircraft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan 1988 - USS Samuel B. Roberts struck Iranian mine off Qatar 1989 - First Navy ship arrives on scene to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

This Day in Naval History – April 14

1898 - Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace 1969 - North Korean aircraft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan 1988 - USS Samuel B. Roberts struck Iranian mine off Qatar 1989 - First Navy ship arrives on scene to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup (Source: Navy News Service)

From VLCC Bridge To Beans Café

Joseph Hazelwood -- the man who was captain of the Exxon Valdez supertanker when it grounded against the Alaska coast has started his first month-long stint of helping out at a kitchen -- Beans Cafe -- that serves Anchorage's poor and homeless. The community service is part of his sentence for his criminal conviction stemming from the 1989 accident in which about 35,000 tons of oil were spilled in Prince William Sound.

Ex-'Exxon Valdez' Refused Entry by India

Exxon Valdez Aground: Photo credit NOAA US Govt.

The ship, now known as the "Oriental Nicety," entered Indian waters last week and was headed for Gujarat, when the Supreme Court gave its order, according to a news report in 'The Times of India'. The ship was bought recently by the Hong Kong-based subsidiary of an Indian shipbreaking firm and was being taken to the coastal town of Alang, the hub of India's shipbreaking industry, for dismantling. After the court's order, Gujarat maritime authorities and the state's pollution control authorities withdrew the permission they had granted to the company to anchor the ship near the Alang beach.

Chalos Joins K&L Gates New York Office

Michael G. Chalos has joined the New York office of global law firm K&L Gates LLP as a partner in the maritime practice. Previously the senior partner at the firm of Chalos O’Connor, LLP, Chalos is accompanied in his move by associates Luke Reid and George Kontakis in the firm’s Boston and New York offices, respectively. With a focus on traditional maritime and criminal environmental law, Chalos represents clients involved in high-profile civil and criminal environmental litigation. This has included the successful defense of the masters of the Exxon Valdez oil tanker and Selendang Ayu cargo ship, as well as numerous United States- and foreign-based corporations, ship owners, managers, operators, and crew who were the targets of criminal investigations by the U.S. government.

Vessel Sinking Sullies Prince William Sound

A fishing ship that sank last week and is leaking diesel fuel has caused the biggest spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound since the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster, posing a threat to the area's wildlife, state environmental officials said. The Seattle-based Windy Bay was loaded with about 35,000 gallons (133,000 liters) of diesel fuel when it struck a rock and sank on Saturday in the northern part of the sound about 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the port of Valdez. The spill was tiny compared with the 11 million gallons (40 million liters) of crude oil dumped by the Exxon Valdez when it ran aground on a reef outside Valdez in 1989, polluting miles (km) of coastline.

Marine Pollution Control Off-Loads New Carissa

Detroit-based Marine Pollution Control Corp. (MPC), aided in unloading oil from New Carissa, a Japanese-owned wood chip carrier that ran aground in Coos Bay, Ore. MPC was called in because of its experience in pumping viscous petroleum products, including coal tar and asphalt, and in heating oils in order to make them easier to pump. MPC also has extensive experience in working in dangerous, unstable conditions. While only 400 ft. offshore, New Carissa was being rocked by winds and waves. The world-renowned company is best known for helping to clean up the Exxon Valdez oil spill after lightering the cargo remaining onboard after running aground on Bligh Reef. MPC also responded in the Persian Gulf when Iraq dumped millions of gallons of oil into the sea during the Gulf War.

This Day in U.S. Naval History - April 6

1909 - Commander Robert E. 1917 - U.S. 1945 - First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 - USS Lake Champlain brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda. 1993 - Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing lifesaving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers.

ECDIS Ltd included in MCA Training Provider List

ECDIS Ltd included in MCA Training Provider List. The sad consequences of the grounding of ships have been all too commonly seen on television screens world-wide. Ships such as  Torrey Canyon, Exxon Valdez and Costa Concordia have become household names in recent years, and the consequences for the environment, the loss of lives, ships and cargoes, together with the costs to insurance companies, have been all too clear for media audiences all around the planet. The UK government, through the MCA (Maritime and Coastguard Agency) has responded to a call from the IMO (International Maritime Organization) for all ships of 500 tons or more to be fitted with ECDIS within a sliding timescale and for the deck officers of those ships to be carefully trained in the use of ECDIS.

This Day in Naval History – April 6

1909 - Commander Robert E. 1917 - U.S. 1945 - First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 - USS Lake Champlain brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda. 1993 - Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing lifesaving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died.

This Day in Naval History – April 6

1909 - Commander Robert E. 1917 - U.S. 1945 - First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 - USS Lake Champlain brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda. 1993 - Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing lifesaving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died.

Washington State New Contingency Plan Rules Proposed

The Washington State Department of Ecology released proposed Oil Spill Contingency Plan Regulations. The proposed rules would totally replace the current ones and are intended to ensure that ship owners and operators and oil handling facilities demonstrate they can quickly and effectively respond to oil spills. The proposed rule focuses on early spill response actions, staging response equipment throughout the state, and conducting scheduled and unannounced spill readiness drills. The Preliminary Cost Benefit Analysis estimates the annual cost of the proposed rule to be $6.8 million. Compliance benefits are estimated to be in the range of $20 million to $159 million (that is a large range and it assumes that these proposed rules would prevent an Exxon Valdez-type spill).

Exxon Valdez: March 24, 1989

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez grounded on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska. The resultant spill of 11 million gallons of crude oil was not the largest in US history and most people forget that salvage and response efforts kept the majority of the oil safety on board the ship. The incident resulted in the relatively swift passage of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90). A subsequent USCG Report  provides some context for the incident and changes that resulted therefrom. One of the ironies of history is that Bligh Reef was named by Captain James Cook (during his third voyage of exploration in 1778) for William Bligh, who served as master of the HMS RESOLUTION during the expedition.

Prestige Breaking Up

SMIT Salvage has confirmed that the Prestige is currently breaking up in international waters. The Salvage team remains on scene but has had no choice but to disconnect from the stricken vessel. 77,000 tons of heavy fuel oil as cargo. miles west of Cape Finisterre. attempt would have been successful. and Portugal. The crew was evacuated safely, but the master has been arrested by Spanish authorities for allegedly causing environmental damage and delaying salvage. be twice as large as that of the Exxon Valdez.

Activists Want Exxon-Mobil Deal Stalled Over Spill

A group of activists have proposed that the merger of Exxon and Mobil be halted until Exxon pays a $5 billion court-ordered settlement to thousands of people affected by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. The appeal was linked to the oil spill's 10th anniversary on March 24 and the start of the 16th biennial International Oil Spill Conference in Seattle. The event is sponsored by the USCG, EPA, IMO and International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association. Washington Republican Sen. Slade Gorton said in a videotaped statement to the conference he opposed the Exxon-Mobil merger until the punitive-damage settlement to thousands of fishermen, small business owners and Alaska Natives was paid.

VTMS to Help Ensure Safe Passage for Tankers

Lockheed Martin Ocean, Radar & Sensor Systems (OR&SS) has completed final acceptance testing of its Vessel Traffic Management System (VTMS) in Valdez, Alaska. The project, valued at $1.2 million, will assist the USCG in helping to ensure safe passage for oil tanker ships passing through Prince William Sound into the Port of Valdez Bay to take on oil pumped from the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. USCG concerns about Y2K compliance along with Prince William Sound's notoriety were equally important reasons for the initial OR&SS system to be put in place this year. The USCG plans to continue upgrading the capability of the Prince William Sound VTMS next year.

Piracy Attacks Surge

Piracy attacks on oil tankers surged to unprecedented levels during the first quarter of 2001, reinforcing fears that the onslaught will sooner or later result in ecological catastrophe. "There has been an increase in the number of tankers attacked," Jayant Abhyankar, deputy director of piracy investigator the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) said. Nearly half of the 56 cargo ships attacked in the first quarter of the year were tankers, compared to 28 percent in last year's first quarter, according to the IMB's latest report. Last week, Abhyankar warned a tanker owners' conference that pirate attacks on tankers in Asia's crowded shipping lanes were a growing threat to navigation.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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