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Friday, January 19, 2018

Invasive Species News

GAO Issues Invasive Species Report

The General Accounting Office (GAO) issued its report on invasive species: state and other non-federal perspectives on challenges to managing the problem. The report discusses state perspectives on: (1) gaps in federal legislation addressing invasive species; (2) barriers to managing invasive species; (3) effective leadership structures for addressing invasive species; and (4) integrating federal aquatic and terrestrial invasive species legislation. Current ballast water requirements were cited as inadequate. Source: HK Law

Trojan Marinex Awarded for Fighting Invasive Species

Photo: Trojan Marinex

Trojan Marinex has been named the winner of the 2016 Outstanding Private Sector Achievement award from the Reduce Risks from Invasive Species Coalition (RRISC). The award goes to a private sector company that has introduced a product or service that has the potential to make a significant contribution to reducing the environmental and economic risks posed by invasive species. The award – recognizing Trojan’s environmental stewardship and ballast water treatment technology – was presented on June 15, 2016 at the annual RRISC Congressional Reception in Washington, D.C.

Environmental Summit to Convene in Chicago

Experts on aquative invasive species along with environmental engineers and fishing and river-carrier interests will convene on May 14 and 15 in Chicago for a meeting to discuss practical ways to prevent invasive species from moving between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins. More than 60 people from the United States, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom will participate in the summit. The summit will begin with presentations on invasive-species transfer, wastewater management, flood control, and navigation and shipping. Participants will devise a work plan for preventing further environmental degradation and impacts on marine-related industries in the two basins. Mayor Daley and Chicago’s Department of Environment, along with William F.

Invasive Species Research and Development Bill Introduced

Representative Ehlers (R-MI) introduced a bill (H.R. 5395) to establish marine and freshwater research, development, and demonstration programs to support efforts to prevent, control, and eradicate invasive species, as well as to educate citizens and stakeholders and restore ecosystems. Source: HK Law

Hearing on Implementation of National Invasive Species Act

The Subcommittees on Water Resources and on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure will conduct a joint hearing on May 15, 2002 on implementation of the National Invasive Species Act of 1996. That act, among other things, established a voluntary program for ballast water management by ships calling in U.S. ports. It also provided that the program should become mandatory if participation in the voluntary program is inadequate.

BWT: the Cost of Great Lakes Invasive Species Damage

Research project shows invasive species cost the Great Lakes millions of dollars. Although there has been growing recognition among researchers and policymakers that shipborne invasive species cause a considerable economic toll, this environmental problem often goes unaddressed because of the difficulty in quantifying annual impacts on ecosystem services. However, a new paper by researchers from the University of Notre Dame, the University of Wyoming and the Technical University of Delft in the Netherlands assigns a dollar figure on the cost to the Great Lakes from invasive species that originate in the ballast water of ocean-going vessels. David M. Lodge and John D. Rothlisberger of Notre Dame, David C. Finnoff of Wyoming, and Roger M.

AGLPA Responds to BWT Research Findings

Steven A. Fisher, Executive Director of the American Great Lakes Ports Association takes issue with the findings of a Notre Dame Ballast Water Technology research paper. In recent years, a debate has raged between the maritime industry and environmental activists regarding the appropriate regulation of ships' ballast water. This public policy discussion has unfortunately been tainted by considerable misinformation. Such misinformation fuels "issue hysteria" and leads to poorly crafted regulations.

Canada Introduces Regulations to Address Aquatic Invasive Species

Photo: Canada Fisheries and Oceans

The entry into force of new regulations to strengthen the prevention of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in Canadian waters was announced today by Canada’s Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Gail Shea. The Government of Canada, which spends more than $14 million on AIS issues annually, worked with provincial and territorial governments to develop the Aquatic Invasive Species Regulations. The regulations provide tools for both the Department and provinces to prevent the introduction and spread of AIS…

Effective Means Of Combating Invasive Aquatic Species Urged

Witnesses representing the shipping industry, ports, and an environmental organization met on May 15 to urge the development of mandatory federal ballast water management regulations and alternative management options to more effectively address the problem of aquatic invasive species in the United States. The joint hearing of the U.S. House Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee and the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee focused on the implementation of the National Invasive Species Act of 1996 (NISA), which addresses aquatic invasive species and required the Transportation Secretary to issue voluntary guidelines to prevent the introduction of invasive species by vessels equipped with ballast water tanks.

MarAd Awards Contract to Battle Invasive Species

The Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has awarded a $350,000 contract to the Northwest-Midwest Institute’s Great Ships Initiative to develop appropriate protocols for ballast water discharge sampling. Ballast water has been a major factor in the spread of invasive species. Proper and standardized ballast discharge sampling protocols are fundamental to verifying that ballast water treatment technology is effective aboard a working ship, as well as in the laboratory. The new contract is for targeted, empirical, engineering and biological research to design and validate a ballast sampling method that is reliable, replicable, and cost-effective for both the ship owner and the regulatory community.

EPA' Issue Final Draft Ballast Water VGP

The US EPA release the Final Draft of the Vessel General Permit (VGP) which comes in to force 19 December 2013. The aim of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System's (NPDES) 2013 Vessel General Permit (VGP) is to protect the nation's waters from ship-borne pollutants and reduce invasive species. 2013. The new permit includes a stricter numeric discharge standard limiting the release of non-indigenous invasive species in ballast water. It also contains additional environmental protection for the Great Lakes, requiring certain vessels to take additional precautions. The 2013 final VGP seeks to reduce the administrative burden for vesselowners and operators by eliminating duplicate reporting requirements…

Study: Closure of the St. Lawrence Seaway Not Needed to Fight Invasive Species

Closing the St. Lawrence Seaway to ocean-going vessels is not the answer to ending the further introduction of aquatic invasive species (AIS) into the Great Lakes, said a study by the National Academy of Sciences. The study drew praise from the U.S. Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC), the federal agency responsible for the passage of vessels into the Great Lakes. The study, Great Lakes Shipping, Trade, and Aquatic Invasive Species, concluded that closing the Seaway could not guarantee prevention of further invasives such as zebra and quagga mussels as non-ship-related vectors would continue to allow AIS into the Great Lakes.

Senate Committee OKs Ballast Water Bill

WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation today voted unanimously to approve the “Ballast Water Management Act of 2005” (S. 363), introduced by Senator Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) and co-sponsored by Senators Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), Paul Sarbanes (D-Maryland), and Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii). The legislation would amend the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 to establish a new, national approach to addressing invasive species in ballast water. Under the Manager’s Amendment approved today, the Coast Guard is authorized to direct $20 million annually, in fiscal years 2006 through 2010, toward invasive species mitigation.

Global Treaty to Halt Invasive Aquatic Species On

Photo:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

A key international measure for environmental protection that aims to stop the spread of potentially invasive aquatic species in ships’ ballast water enters into force today (8 September 2017). The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention) requires ships to manage their ballast water to remove, render harmless, or avoid the uptake or discharge of aquatic organisms and pathogens within ballast water and sediments.

IMO: TBT Ban Could Have Adverse Effects

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) held its 43rd session of the Marine Environmental Protection Committee (MEPC) from June 28th through July 1st. Delegates to the MEPC were expected to consider a proposal to ban the application of tributyltin (TBT) self-polishing copolymer paints by the year 2003. At the previous MEPC session in November 1998, delegates prepared a draft resolution that calls for a ban on the application of TBT by 2003 and a ban on its use by 2008. These dates were designated based on the assumption that viable alternatives would be available on the market. However, since November, serious questions have been raised concerning the possible adverse environmental effects and the availability of suitable alternative paints.

DEC Pushes for Ballast Rules for Oceangoing Ships

With a new invasive species discovered almost every six months in the Great Lakes, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Pete Grannis is calling on federal officials to close a loophole that has fueled the problem. An exemption to the federal Clean Water Act effectively allows ocean-going ships to dump ballast water in American’s inland waters, bringing aquatic invaders from zebra mussels to lampreys to the ruffe to the round goby. This has rapidly harmed the ecology of U.S. waters, especially the Great Lakes. Grannis encouraged the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to take action to force ships to clean out their ballast tanks before entering the nation’s waterways.

AWO Addresses Fight against Invasive Species in the Great Lakes

Tom Allegretti

Responding to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study report released today by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, American Waterways Operators (AWO) President & CEO Tom Allegretti reiterated the tugboat, towboat and barge industry’s understanding of the need to prevent the movement of invasive species, including Asian carp, between the two watersheds by utilizing a comprehensive set of science-based control measures that protect the free flow of waterborne commerce that is vital to the regional and national economies.

Ballast Water Management Hearing Held

On March 25, the Subcommittees on Coast Guard & Maritime Transportation and on Water Resources & Environment of the House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure conducted a joint hearing on Ballast Water Management. The purpose of the hearing was to examine the international ballast water standards recently agreed to by the IMO and to review reauthorization of the National Invasive Species Act (NISA). RADM Thomas Gilmour, USCG, Assistant Commandant for Marine Safety, Security, and Environmental Protection, testified that the new international convention sets reasonable standards, while allowing individual port states to establish more stringent requirements. Joseph J. Cox, Shipping Industry Ballast Water Coalition, testified in support of international regime adopted at IMO.

Measures Announced to Prevent Environmental Damage from Harmful Aquatic Plants and Animals

The USCG announced measures to prevent environmental and health problems resulting from harmful aquatic plants and animals carried from abroad in ships' ballast water, a move reflecting the Department of Transportation's commitment to controlling and preventing the introduction of these species. A new interim rule, effective July 1, requires ships operating outside of U.S. waters to report their ballast water management practices. It also establishes voluntary ballast water management guidelines for all waters of the U.S. The USCG is taking these actions to implement the National Invasive Species Act (NISA) of 1996. Current federal regulations…

Bill Introduced to Protect Great Lakes from Invasive Species

The Guarding Our Great Lakes Act, a bipartisan legislation designed to protect the Great Lakes from the threat of invasive Asian carp, has been introduced by U.S. Congressman Dave Camp (R-Mich.), Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Congresswoman Louise Slaughter (D-N.Y.). Additional cosponsors of the bill include Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Carl Levin (D-Mich.), Congresswoman Candice Miller (R-Mich.) and Congressman Gary Peters (D-Mich.). In 2012, Rep. Camp and Sen. Stabenow secured passage of the Stop Invasive Species Act, to expedite the Great Lakes Mississippi River Interbasin Study (GLMRIS) being conducted by the Army Corps of Engineers, which was supposed to formulate a plan to prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes.

Ballast Water Convention to Enter into Force in 2017

Päivi Luostarinen handed over the country’s instrument of acceptance to the Ballast Water Management Convention to Kitack Lim on Thursday, September 8, 2016.

Finland has acceded to the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention), triggering the 2017 entry into force of an international environmental protection measure that aims to stop the spread of potentially invasive aquatic species in ships’ ballast water, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) said. Päivi Luostarinen, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Finland to IMO…

GloBallast Story Published at UN Ocean Conference

Photo: Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

During the 20th century, tiny organisms carried in the ballast water of ships began to be recognized as alien invasive species. These aquatic species were hitching a ride across the oceans and some were embedding themselves in new areas, multiplying and becoming harmful invasive aquatic species. The impacts on native species, local ecosystems and sea-based economies have, in some cases, been devastating. The story of how global partnerships, governments, industry, academia and other stakeholders came together to tackle this problem is told in a new publication…

Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force to Meet

The Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force/National Invasive Species Council (NISC) Prevention Committee, sponsored by the Fish and Wildlife Service, will meet in Washington, DC on May 4. Items on the agenda include review and approval of the Roles and Responsibilities draft document; identification of the Prevention Committee member’s responsibilities to the five working groups; and discussion of actions required to get working groups functioning. 69 Fed. Reg. 21569 (HK Law).

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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