Marine Link
Sunday, August 19, 2018

Metro Machine Corp News

NORSHIPCO to Purchase Dry Dock

The dock, expected to be operational by the end of May, will be relocated to NORSHIPCO and placed in an area previously occupied by a similar size dock, which was retired two years ago. The agreement provides additional opportunities for the exchange of work and dry dock utilization. The acquisition of the dock positions NORSHIPCO as a stronger competitor in the U.S. Navy, Military Sealift Command (MSC), and commercial ship repair markets. The added dry dock capacity affords NORSHIPCO the opportunity to pursue additional areas of work, which could lead to more level-loading of the yard's skilled workforce. NORSHIPCO's workers specialize in the repair and modernization of Naval vessels and various cruise and commercial cargo fleets.

Metro Machine Agrees to Purchase UltraStrip

UltraStrip Systems, Inc. announced that Metro Machine Corp. of Norfolk, Va. has agreed to purchase a high production prototype UltraStrip robotic paint removal system for $2 million. Metro is developing a marine vessel enclosure, paint removal, and coating system, the Metro Ship Coating System, and will be evaluating the UltraStrip prototype for use in the Metro Ship Coating System. Dr. Robert O. Baratta, president and CEO of UltraStrip Systems said, "Metro plans to use the UltraStrip technology in its own shipyard and market the Metro Ship Coating System with the UltraStrip technology to other shipyards and ship repair companies.

Heightened Scrutiny On Ship Scrapping

Ever since two enterprising reporters for the Baltimore Sun decided, in 1997, to take a closer look at ship scrapping, first at a Baltimore shipyard dismantling a Navy ship, and subsequently an in depth review of scrapping conditions in Alang, India, the light of public attention has been shining on this oldest of maritime practices. With this scrutiny, the world of scrapping ships will be forever changed — hopefully for the better. Following the end of the Cold War, the Navy's downsizing its fleet, and the requirement to replace tankers with more modern and environmentally safer ships, the demand to decommission and dispose of obsolete vessels is increasing at a pace more rapid than the capacity exists to handle this demand. Certainly, this is true in the U.

Ship Disposal Encounters Enviro, Political Hurdles

By Joan M. Bondareff and Charles T. In 2001, Congress directed the Maritime Administration (MarAd) to dispose of all obsolete vessels in its inventory by September 30, 2006, and to do so "in the manner that provides the best value to the Government." At present, MarAd has 104 non-retention ships not under contract in three locations around the country-James River Reserve Fleet in Virginia, Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Texas, and Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet in California. MarAd is using a variety of ship disposal options, which include domestic and foreign dismantling/recycling to accomplish this directive. Both have been controversial and foreign scrapping has prompted litigation. This article describes what MarAd is doing and what laws are implicated in this mission. The U.S.

General Dynamics Completes Metro Machine Acquisition

Transaction expands company’s capabilities in ship repair market. General Dynamics (NYSE: GD) today completed its acquisition of Metro Machine Corp., a leading East Coast surface-ship repair company that supports the U.S. Navy fleet in Norfolk, Va. The value of the cash transaction has not been disclosed. Metro Machine Corp. now becomes part of the shipbuilding and repair operations of San Diego-based General Dynamics NASSCO, a leading provider of ships to the Navy, a major producer of commercial vessels and the largest shipbuilding and repair company on the West Coast. “The addition of Metro Machine enhances our ability to compete in the growing naval ship repair market,” said Fred Harris, president, General Dynamics NASSCO.

Shipyard to Close Facilities in Philadelphia

Metro Machine Corp., a Norfolk, Va., company that came here a dozen years ago with dreams of building a radically new type of tanker ship, is shutting down its Philadelphia operations. The tankers it hoped to build offered innovations to protect the environment, but no one was willing to risk buying the first ship of an unproven design. To sustain its operation here while seeking ship orders, Metro did work including overhauls and scrapping ships. The city is already seeking a ship-repair company to lease the two dry docks at the old Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, at the foot of Broad Street, that Metro has been using. A supplier network is developing around the Aker Philadelphia Shipyard, formerly named Kvaerner, which could make the adjacent Metro space more attractive.

Ship Company Leaves Philadelphia

A Norfolk, Va.-based ship repair company, which once promised enterprise and hundreds of jobs for Chester and Philadelphia, will close the last of its Philadelphia operations in July. For the past six years, Metro Machine Corp. had contracts with the U.S. Navy to dismantle inactive ships. Its latest solicitation in April turned up zero work orders, forcing the company to cease its work at the Philadelphia Naval Yard and leave about 100 workers jobless. Metro expects to complete its final disassembly on the USS Stark by the end of June, and then remove its equipment from dry dock 2 and dry dock 3 by July 14. The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp.…

USS Carter Hall Drydocking Contract for GD NASSCO

USS Carter Hall: Photo USN

In the latest listing of US Department of Defense, Navy contracts, General Dynamics, NASSCO, Norfolk, Va., (formerly Metro Machine Corp.) has been awarded a  $171,961,941 undefinitized contract action as a modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-09-C-4416) for 'USS Carter Hall' fiscal 2014 extended dry-docking planned maintenance. Work will be performed in Norfolk, Va., and is expected to be completed by April 2015. Fiscal 2014 operations and maintenance, Navy and Fiscal 2014 other procurement, Navy funds in the amount of $104,155,547 will be obligated at time of award.

Metro Machine Wins Drydock Contract

Metro Machine Corp., Norfolk, Va., is being awarded an $8,476,047 firm-fixed-price contract for the Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) of the USS Ross (DDG-71). Work includes miscellaneous drydocking structural, electrical, and mechanical repairs including shipalts and alterations equivalent to repairs. Work will be performed in Norfolk, Va., and is expected to be completed by June 2005. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The contract was competitively procured via the Internet, with three proposals solicited and two offers received. The Mid Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center, USN, Portsmouth, Va., is the contracting activity (N40025-05-C-5010).

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Aug 2018 - The Shipyard Edition

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