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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Navy Budget News

CNO Puts Warfighting First in Navy’s Five-year Plan

CNO Adm. Greenert holds an all-hands call with service members, civilians and their families at Naval Support Activity Bahrain where he discussed the current status of the Navy and presented U.S. Naval Forces Central Command with the Navy Unit Commendation for meritorious service in the performance of assigned missions from June 2010 to June 2015. (US Navy photo by Nathan Laird)

U.S. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert on Monday highlighted the U.S. Navy's intended track and investments in a document that outlines the Navy’s navigational plan for the next five years. "This year's navigation plan highlights our Navy's key investments, which support missions and functions outlined in the defense strategic guidance (DSG)," said Greenert in the document released Monday. Greenert's 2016-2020 Navigation Plan, released to the Navy's senior leaders and distributed on the its social media properties…

Pentagon Chief Unveils Plans to Buy More High-end Ships

U.S. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (Photo: U.S. Department of Defense)

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter on Wednesday mapped out plans for the U.S. Navy to buy more high-end submarines, destroyers, fighter jets and unmanned underwater vehicles using $8 billion in savings generated by scaling back orders for smaller Littoral Combat Ships. Carter said the Pentagon's five-year budget plan also included $2.9 billion to modify Raytheon Co's SM-6 missiles for use as powerful anti-ship weapons, and buy 625 more of the weapons, which are now used for missile defense.

Senators Urge to Boost Navy Budget

The Sun Herald has reported that 16 senators, including Mississippi Republican Trent Lott added their names to the list of lawmakers urging Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld to increase funding to the Navy in 2008 to pay for more ships. The lawmakers told Rumsfeld the new ships were needed to counter an emerging threat from the rapidly expanding Chinese navy. The request comes on the heels of a similar call last week by 69 members of the House of Representatives, including Rep. Gene Taylor, a Bay St. Louis Democrat. The group wants Rumsfeld to up the Navy's budget proposal to $14.1 billion in fiscal 2008, which begins Oct. 1, 2007. That figure represents the amount that Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Michael Mullen says is necessary to meet the Navy's national security requirements.

DoD FY '13 Budget Proposal: $13B/Year in Shipbuilding

President Barack Obama sent Congress a proposed defense budget of $613.9 billion for fiscal 2013, Feb. 13. The request for the Department of Defense (DoD) includes $525.4 billion in discretionary budget authority to fund base defense programs and $88.5 billion to support Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO), primarily in Afghanistan. Of the discretionary budget, $155.9 billion represents the Department of the Navy's budget request. This is a decrease of $1.4 billion from last year's baseline appropriation. Rear Adm.

Chief of Naval Operations Testifies on FY14 Budget Priorities

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee on the Department of the Navy defense authorization request for fiscal year 2014. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter D. Lawlor/Released)

The Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary of the Navy, and Commandant of the Marine Corps testified together April 25 before the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) on the Department of the Navy budget request for fiscal year 2014. The three naval leader's testimony emphasized the realities of sequestration restraints on the fiscal year 2014 defense budget presented to congress earlier this month. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Admiral Jonathan W. Greenert delivered an opening…

Navy CNO Sets Out Annual 'Navigation Plan'

Adm. Jonathan Greenert: Photo USN

The Navy's top leader has released a detailed plan that highlights the U.S. Navy's intended track and investments for the next 5 fiscal years, informs Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs. Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert's 2015-2019 Navigation Plan defines how the Navy will use its resources to safely and effectively pursue the vision detailed in Sailing Directions. "This navigation plan defines the course and speed we will follow to organize, train and equip our Navy over the next several years," said Greenert in the document.

Report: Lockheed Could Lose LCS Contract

Adm. Michael Mullen, the Navy's Chief of Naval Operations, said Thursday that Lockheed Martin Corp. could lose part of its Littoral Combat Ship contract, depending on the results of a pending review, as reported in Business Week. Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin is on contract to build two ships, dubbed LCS 1 and LCS 3. The first ship is under construction and considerably over budget, which recently prompted the Navy to halt work on LCS 3. The Navy is on course to decide in the next few weeks whether to move to termination or to continue the program for LCS 3 according to reports. The Navy plans to build 55 of the new ships, which are designed to hunt mines, submarines and small enemy boats in coastal waters.

US Navy: Fewer Ships and No funds for DD-X?

The U.S. Navy proposes to build four new ships in 2006, with no funding earmarked for the new DD-X destroyer being designed by Northrop Grumman Corp., Reuters reported. It appears that rising fuel costs, health care costs and Iraq war costs have effectively conspired to sap the navy budget. According to Reuters, it calls for the Navy to spend $6 billion in 2006 to build one of the two Northrop LPD-17 amphibious assault ships initially planned; one Littoral Combat Ship; one T-AKE logistic ship and one nuclear-powered Virginia-class attack submarine, both built by General Dynamics Corp. The Navy proposal, being evaluated by officials drafting the overall Pentagon budget…

Navy Budgets for Future Force

President Bush submitted his 2007 fiscal year (FY) budget request to Congress recently, which included the Navy's $127 billion budget proposal. The president's budget request was also accompanied by the recently released Department of Defense's Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR). The Navy's proposed budget boasts a $4.4 billion increase from last year's baseline appropriations. If approved, the FY07 - FY11 budget provides the necessary funding levels to sustain current readiness, build the fleet for the future and develop the 21st Century Sailor over the next four years, which means a possible increase in pay and benefits, as well as several quality of life improvements.

Department of Navy Announces FY12 Budget

Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Budget, Rear Adm. Joe Mulloy, briefed the Fiscal Year 2012 Department of the Navy budget roll-out at the Pentagon, Feb. 14. "The FY12 budget request reflects the Navy's continued commitment to Sailors, Marines, civilians, and their families," said Mulloy. "It reaffirms the valuable contribution our assets make across the full spectrum of warfare and increases the capability of our fleet. While military pay will increase 1.6 percent, additionally, reenlistment bonuses for key rates are being maintained, and selective reenlistment bonuses are being offered. President Barack Obama's budget for Fiscal Year 2012 was submitted to Congress Feb.

U.S. Rep. Taylor: Navy Budget Insufficient

WASHINGTON, DC – After reviewing the President’s defense budget and hearing testimony from the Secretary of the Navy on Thursday, Congressman Gene Taylor (D-MS) expressed his concern about the number of ships funded under the FY06 defense budget request. “The Navy’s request for reductions in several important shipbuilding programs will leave the United States short of the fleet size needed to meet existing security requirements,” Taylor said. A senior member of the House Armed Services Committee and co-chairman of the newly formed Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus, Taylor articulated his dismay over the declining number of ships in the U.S. Navy fleet. “The shrinking is not just about numbers, but about reduced capabilities that threaten our national security.

Editor's Note

Despite the renewed vigor for military activities due to the prolonged commitment to fighting terrorism at home and abroad, it seems that lawmakers are still reticent — via the proposal of a Navy Budget for Fiscal Years '02 and '03 — to spend adequate levels of money to maintain a strong fleet. According to the American Shipbuilding Association (ASA), The Defense Authorization Bill for FY02, that passed both the House and Senate (S.1438) on December 13, authorizes a paltry 5 and 1/7 new naval ships, despite the ASA's contention that 12 ships per year are needed to sustain the 305-ship navy mandated in the 1997 Quadrennial Defense Review. Meanwhile, a draft of the Navy's FY03 budget proposes to buy only five new ships.

Senate to Rumsfeld: The Navy Needs More Ships

On Friday, June 23, 2006, Senators Susan Collins (R-ME); Jack Reed (D-RI); Trent Lott (R-MS); Jim Talent (R-MO); Olympia Snowe (R-ME); Christopher Dodd (D-CT); Lincoln Chafee (R-RI); Mike Dewine (R-OH); Lindsey Graham (R-SC); Daniel Akaka (D-HI), David Vitter (R-LA); Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ); Bill Nelson (D-FL); Joe Leiberman (D-CT); Maria Cantwell (D-WA), and; Mary Landrieu (D-LA) sent a letter to Secretary of Defense, Donald H. Rumseld, asking him to increase the Navy’s top line budget for the purpose of increasing the ship procurement budget in fiscal year 2008. The request comes on the heels of a letter sent by members of the House of Representatives Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus urging support for the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), Adm. Michael C.

US Rep. Expects Congress to Add Ships to Defense Budget

U.S. Rep. Gene Taylor, D-Miss., said that lawmakers will try to add extra ships to the Navy budget, in addition to whatever the Pentagon requests, The Marketplace reported. Taylor said that President George W. Bush isn't fully focused on military needs as the White House prepares its 2008 budget proposal. As a result, Congress ought to use earmarks or other tools to step in, he said. Taylor is a member of the House Armed Services Committee and leads its subcomittee in charge of shipbuilding. Democrats have renamed this panel the Seapower and Expeditionary Forces Subcommittee, replacing its Republican-era moniker as the "Projection Forces" panel. Congress will hold hearings to decide what types of ships the Navy needs, Taylor said.

Navy Budget Proposal Causes Commotion on Capitol Hill

Just when it seemed as though the U.S. Navy, which has served more than any other military sector as the budget whipping post in the post Cold War era, was positioned to attract long overdue funds, the budget rug was once again pulled. In proposing a Pentagon budget of $379 billion … a $48 billion increase … the Bush administration has again shorted the U.S. Navy. Reaction from Capitol Hill was swift and without censor, as lawmakers and lobbying groups weighed in with equal fury, according to numerous wire reports and hastily written press briefings. "The trend in shipbuilding worsens in this budget," said Rep. Ike Skelton, top Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee, according to one wire report. In another report, Sen. Edward M.

Navy Budget Debated in Congress

PICTURED: Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Mike Mullen, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV), the Honorable Donald C. Winter and Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC) Gen. Michael W. Hagee appear before the House Armed Services Committee to give testimony and answer questions concerning the 2007 fiscal year National Defense Authorization budget request. U.S. The nation’s top Navy and Marine Corps leaders told members of Congress March 1 that the Navy Department’s proposed $127.3 billion budget request for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) fully supports the Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) and will help win the global war on terrorism. In testimony before the House Armed Services Committee, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Donald C. Winter, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm.

Navy Battling Shipbuilding Cost Overruns, Delays

According to Reuters, U.S. Navy shipbuilding has long been plagued by billions of dollars of cost overruns and lengthy, schedule delays, but acquisition chief Delores Etter says she sees encouraging signs of progress. But the former Naval Academy electrical engineering professor said both the Navy and U.S. shipbuilders have begun making changes that should lead to improvements. She said Navy officials were working with U.S. lawmakers to move toward greater funding stability for shipbuilding. Frustrated by chronic cost overruns and keen to maintain well-paying jobs in their home districts, lawmakers have in the past tweaked Navy budget plans, adding ships, delaying ships and blocking plans to have just one shipyard build a ship.

US Naval Secretary Calls for 355-ship Fleet

Ray Mabus (Photo: U.S. Navy)

In announcing the results of the 2016 Force Structure Assessment (FSA), U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus recommended a 355-ship fleet, including 12 carriers, 104 large surface combatants, 52 small surface combatants, 38 amphibious ships and 66 submarines. The FSA is a year-long effort which began in January that was conducted to evaluate long-term defense security requirements for future naval forces today at the Pentagon in Arlington, Va. Mabus’ assessment will be one input to the Navy's FY-2018 30-year shipbuilding plan.

CNO Sets Out Fleet Navigation Plan

CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert on ship visit: Photo credit USN

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert, charts the course for the US Navy 2014 – 2018. The CNO explains that Sailing Directions assist mariners in planning a long voyage by describing the destination, providing guidance on which routes to take, and identifying the conditions, cautions, and aids to navigation along the way. CNO’s Sailing Directions likewise provide a vision, tenets, and principles to guide our Navy as we chart a course to remain ready to meet current challenges…

A Good Idea, But...

The General Accounting Office throws some cold water on the USCG's largest acquisition program ever - the Deepwater Project, a $9.8 billion program designed to significantly upgrade the USCG's marine and air fleets over the next 20 years. The U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) has issued a report (GAO/RCED-99-6) which raises serious questions regarding the USCG's proposed $9.8 billion, 20-year deepwater asset revamp. Specifically, GAO questions the need for such a large program, considering many ships and aircraft are now able to be used well beyond their originally intended service life because of advances in maintenance. GAO also…

Navy Doubles Minesweeper Presence in Persian Gulf

Minehunting: Photo credit USN

Four more minesweepers and four more minesweeping helicopters are to be sent to the Persian Gulf, a move which will increase the number of mine countermeasure forces available to keep open the sea lanes around the Strait of Hormuz should Iran choose to mine that critical waterway. “We are moving four more minesweepers to the region, making eight,” Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations (CNO), told the U.S. Senate Armed Services committee during a Navy budget hearing.

U.S. Navy To Pay Cheney's Utility Bill?

The White House is asking the U.S. Navy to pay the six-figure utility bill for Vice President Dick Cheney's house, as Democrats accused Cheney, the administration's point man on energy policy, of "staggering insensitivity." The bill for electricity, gas and water for the 33-room official vice presidential residence at the U.S. Naval Observatory is projected at $136,000 for fiscal 2002 which ends in September, compared with a budget of $43,600, the White House said. The bills have far outstripped the budget since an electricity meter was installed in 1998, the White House said. This has driven Cheney to practice the energy conservation…

Torpedo and Missile Attack Vessel Launched in Italy

The ship was launched at the Riva Trigosa yard in Genoa on October 14, 2005, three years after the first plate was cut. Biraghi said “the plan put into action in the last few years in an extremely decisive manner will make available a fleet which is smaller but of the highest level. Delivery of the Andrea Doria is planned for the beginning of 2008. The ship was designed and built with funds from the navy budget and is the first of two vessels of the Orizzonte class commissioned at Fincantieri. At the beginning of 2010 the Andrea Doria will be joined by the Caio Duilio which started its building in 2003. The most up-to-date systems of…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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