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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Oil Export Ports News

Mexico Oil Export Ports Closed

Two of Mexico's chief oil export ports were closed on Tuesday, Reuters reported, because of strong winds and waves in parts of the Gulf of Mexico, port officials said. The port of Dos Bocas, located in the southeastern state of Tabasco, was shuttered as seas crested at 10 ft. and winds gusted at between nine and 12 mph, said an official at the port captain's office. The Pajaritos terminal, part of the Coatzacoalcos complex in eastern Veracruz state, was also closed as waves hit 10 ft. and winds ranged from 21 to 27 mph, said a port official. The Gulf-side port of Cayo Arcas in southeastern Campeche state and the Pacific Port of Salina Cruz were operating normally, said port officials and the Transport Ministry.

Tropical Storm Keith Forces Key Oil Ports To Close

Two of Mexico's key oil export ports were shut down on Wednesday as tropical depression Keith whipped up winds and waves in the Gulf of Mexico, though the effects on oil production were not immediately known, authorities said. The port of Dos Bocas in southeastern Tabasco state was closed as winds blew from 21 and 27 miles per hour and seas swelled at between eight and 10 ft., said the transport ministry in a statement. Cayo Arcas in neighboring Campeche state was also closed, though the transport ministry did not provide details on port conditions.

Weather Stops Crude Exports

Mexico's crude oil export ports Dos Bocas and Pajaritos in the Gulf of Mexico remained closed on Wednesday by bad weather, the Transport Ministry said. Winds of up to 85 kmph were whipping up 14-ft. waves at Coatzacoalcos the Veracruz state port where Pajaritos is located, the ministry said. A daily average of 389,000 barrels of extra-light Olmeca crude was exported from Pajaritos in 1997.

Bad Weather Closes 3 Major Mexican Oil Ports

Photo courtesy of the Port of Dos Bocas

Three of Mexico's major oil export ports along the Gulf coast have been closed due to bad weather, the Communications and Transport Ministry said on Tuesday.   Cayo Arcas, Dos Bocas and Coatzacoalcos have been closed since Sunday.   Nearly all of Mexico's crude exports from Pemex, the state-owned oil producer, are shipped from the three ports to Gulf coast refineries in the U.S. states of Texas and Louisiana.     (Reporting by Joanna Zuckerman Bernstein; Editing by Jeffrey Benkoe)

U.S. Crude Jumps $1 on Jobs Data, Libya Doubt

Crude oil prices on both sides of the Atlantic rose on Friday as data showed strong jobs growth in the United States and investors cast doubt on reports Libya's oil ports were about to reopen. The March U.S. non-farm payrolls report showed 192,000 jobs were added in March in major test of the argument that the economic weakness of January and February was due to bad weather. Expectations had been building that an eight-month blockage of Libya's oil export ports would end after rebels and the government said they were close to an agreement. The Libyan government said it had seen evidence of "good intentions" at indirect talks with eastern rebels that could lead to renewed exports.

Mitropoulos Visits Russia

During his week-long official visit to the Russian Federation (July 11-15, 2005), IMO Secretary-General Efthimios E. Mitropoulos has received pledges of continued support for a full range of IMO activities, including the important IMO Voluntary Member State Audit Scheme. In a packed program that included high-level talks as well as a series of visits to key Russian maritime centers, Mr. Mitropoulos received repeated assurance of the Russian Government’s firm intention to continue supporting the development and adoption of global standards for shipping engaged in international trade only through IMO and for the work programme and initiatives of the Organization. Among the senior figures with whom Mr. Mitropoulos enjoyed productive talks during his visit were Mr. M. E.

Libya's Hariga Oil Port Shut Due to Strike

Libya's port (Image: Temehu)

Libya's eastern oil export port Hariga shut down because of a strike over unpaid salaries of  security guards, closing the country's last functioning export port apart from two offshore fields. The closure will lower oil output to less than 300,000 barrels a day, a fraction of the 1.6 million Libya used to pump before the 2011 uprising toppling Muammar Gaddafi. The terminal near Tobruk, with a capacity of 120,000 b/d has by and large escaped disruption thanks to its easterly position.

Libyan Rebel Leader: Govt Has Not Fulfilled Deal to Reopen Ports

A rebel group controlling two large oil export ports in eastern Libya said on Wednesday the government had not fulfilled its part of an agreement to reopen the ports. Abd-Rabbo al-Barassi, self-declared prime minister of the group, also told a pro-rebel television station it refused to deal with new Prime Minister Ahmed Maiteeq. (Reporting by Ulf Laessing; Editing by Andrew Roche)

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