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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Transportation Statistics News

U.S. National Transportation Statistics 2002 Released

The U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics released the National Transportation Statistics 2002 In the maritime sector, the report notes that the number of U.S.-flag ocean-going vessels of 1,000 gross tons and over decreased from 2,926 in 1960 to 443 in 2001. The U.S. ocean-going tonnage decreased from 32,567,000 dwt to 14,978,000 dwt during this same period. Average vessel size rose from 11,130 dwt to 33,810 dwt. Source: HK Law

U.S. DOT Updates National Transportation Statistics

BTS’ National Transportation Statistics Updated - The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), a part of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), has updated National Transportation Statistics (NTS) – a web-only reference guide to national-level transportation data.   NTS, updated quarterly, includes a wide range of national transportation information. NTS consists of more than 260 tables of national data on the transportation system, safety, the economy and energy and the environment, of which 37 were updated today. The next quarterly update is scheduled for April. NTS  can be viewed on the BTS website.  Contact: Dave Smallen (202) 366-5568.

U.S. Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics Released

On February 27, 2002, the Maritime Administration (MARAD) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) released November 2001 official U.S. foreign waterborne transportation statistics. Year-to-date figures through November 2001 show an increase in volume of 3 percent for imports and a 5 percent decrease in volume for exports over the same time period for 2000. The figures are all derived from the Waterborne Databank, detailed public U.S. foreign waterborne transportation cargo files, which are now available from MARAD.

U.S. Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics Released

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released the U.S. Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics for January 2002. Figures show a decrease in volume of 9 percent for imports and a decrease in volume of 1 percent for exports over January 2001.

U.S. Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics

MARAD released the U.S. Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics for June 2002. Year to date figures show a decrease in volume of 6% for imports and no change in volume for exports over the same period for 2001.

Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics Released

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released the U.S. foreign waterborne transportation statistics for October 2002

U.S. International Trade and Freight Transportation Trends

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics issued a Press Release

Foreign Waterborne Stats For November Released

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released the US foreign waterborne transportation statistics for November 2002

BTS Releases 2001 Statistics

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics released National Transportation Statistics 2001. The report notes that there are 8,379 U.S. vessels of 1,000 gross tons or more). There are 33, 387 U.S. non-self-propelled vessels and 12,738,271 recreational vessels. U.S. vessels comprise approximately 2 percent of the world's international fleet. While a large number of U.S. is continuing apace. The top seaports in tonnage for 2000 were South Louisiana, Houston, New York/New Jersey, New Orleans, and Corpus Christi. Based on value of the cargo, the top seaports were Los Angeles, Long Beach, New York/New Jersey, Houston, and Seattle.

Maritime Sector Moved Largest Percentage of International Trade in 2001

According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics new publication, entitled U.S. International Trade and Freight Transportation Trends, more than 10 percent of the 16 billion tons of freight moved on the U.S. transportation system is international freight. The largest percentage of U.S. international trade (78% by tonnage and 38% by value) moved in the maritime sector in 2001.

U.S. Foreign Waterborne Transportation Statistics

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a Bulletin

Meeting Regarding International Carriage of Goods by Sea

On December 21, 2001, the Maritime Administration (MARAD) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) today released September 2001 official U.S. foreign waterborne transportation statistics. Year-to-date figures through September 2001 show an increase in volume of 3% for imports and a six percent decrease in volume for exports over the same time period for 2000. The following cargo summary contains value and weight information by type of service on U.S. waterborne imports and exports for September 2001, along with year-to-date figures. Source: HK Law

Port of LA is Top Gateway

The Port of Los Angeles became the top U.S. international freight gateway by shipment value in 2003, according to a soon to be released report from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Transportation Statistics. America’s Freight Transportation Gateways shows that Los Angeles’ water port handled $17 billion in export trade and $105 billion in imports, totaling $122 billion in business handled by the port. Los Angeles handled $10 billion more than the $112 billion in freight that moved through JFK International Airport, now the second-ranked international freight gateway in 2003. JFK held the number one position on the list of international freight gateways since 1999, but was overtaken by the Port of Los Angeles last year.

U.S. DOT Report Expects Oceanborne Trade Growth

Global oceanborne commerce is expected to continue to grow three to four percent annually over the next several years, according to a new report released by three agencies of the U.S. Department of Transportation. U.S. international waterborne trade, which accounts for about 20 percent of the global total, is also expected to grow at a similar rate. The report, Maritime Trade and Transportation, 1999, is a result of an ongoing cooperative effort by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, MarAd and the USCG. The report reflectes major trends affecting the industry in the 1990s and devotes considerable attention to the safety and environmental goals of the department, as well as to the critical role of the maritime industry in meeting U.S. national security requirements.

RILA Welcomes Introduction of Port Metrics Bill

In a letter sent Wednesday, the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) applauded Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee Chairman John Thune (R-SD) for introducing legislation that would institute universal port performance standards and a formalized reporting structure for capturing data on true operational capacities of U.S. ports. “Retailers’ supply chain operations are highly dependent on the functionality and efficiency of our U.S. ports,” said Kelly Kolb, vice president for government affairs. The Port Transparency Act (S. 1298) would direct the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) to work with numerous other entities, including port authorities, to obtain applicable and fruitful port performance measures.

Retailers: Port Statistics Bill Would Help Avoid Repeat Slowdown

Photo: Port of Los Angeles

The National Retail Federation (NRF) and more than 100 other business groups called for passage of legislation that would require the Transportation Department to track port statistics, saying it could help avoid a repeat of the congestion and slowdowns that occurred along the West Coast during the labor dispute resolved earlier this year. “U.S. ports are a key component in the American transportation system and the global supply chain that thousands of businesses and millions of workers depend on,” the letter said.

BSEE Addresses Near Miss Reporting

Allyson Anderson (Courtesy BSEE)

Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Associate Director Allyson Anderson addressed the Independent Petroleum Association of America’s (IPAA) Offshore Committee last week during their meeting in Houston. In her address, Anderson highlighted the bureau's work with the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) on the Near-Miss Reporting System and the critical role that industry will play in the success of the program. Anderson said the bureau needs offshore workers to feel empowered to voluntarily report near-misses and be active participants in creating a robust safety culture.

US Senate Panel Approves Bill to Monitor Port Performance

A divided Senate Commerce Committee on Thursday approved legislation requiring the government to report on the performance of major U.S. port operations, including during labor contract talks. The voice vote, which follows a nine-month slowdown at 29 West Coast ports, sent the measure on to possible floor action, over the objections of Democrats and unions who warned that it could lead to improper federal intervention in contract talks. Titled the Port Performance Act, the bill is intended to help Congress analyze supply trends and identify freight bottlenecks by requiring U.S. Department of Transportation data on capacity levels and cargo volumes at major U.S. ports.

U.S. Ranks Second in Maritime Container Traffic

The United States ranks second in world maritime container traffic with one in nine maritime containers in the world either bound for or coming from the United States, according to “America’s Container Ports: Delivering the Goods,” a new report from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS). BTS, a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Research and Innovative Technology Administration, reported that U.S.-container trade in 2005 and 2006 was more than double the trade of a decade earlier. An estimated 46.3 million 20-ft. equivalent units (TEU’s – the standard measure for counting containers of various sizes) passed through U.S. ports in 2006, up from 22.6 million in 1996. Two-thirds of the containers are imported into the United States.

U.S. Freight Volume Dips: Kemp

File image: Barge fleeting operations on the U.S. inland river system (WCI)

Freight volumes in the United States have fallen year on year for the first time since 2012 and before that the recession of 2009, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. The total volume of freight moved by road, rail, pipeline, inland waterways and as air cargo in November 2015 was 1.1 percent lower than in the corresponding month a year earlier. Freight demand growth has been slowing since the start of last year but the slowdown intensified in the second half and November marked the first time that year-on-year growth turned negative.

BSEE Launches Efforts to Reduce Offshore Risk

Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) Director Brian Salerno made two announcements during a press conference in Houston Tuesday at the Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) - each aimed at reducing the risks associated with offshore oil and gas operations. First, Director Salerno announced the launch of the SafeOCS program, an initiative aimed at collecting and analyzing “near miss” data. Second, he released BSEE’s first-ever Annual Report, which presents the agency’s analysis of offshore activities, trends, indicators, incidents and other key data points. Salerno said BSEE is working to identify methods to learn more about the causes of all serious offshore incidents.

AAPA 2016 Conference Focuses on Western Ports

AAPA President and CEO Kurt Nagle.

U.S. High-ranking government officials, policy influencers, port authority CEOs and senior staff from throughout the Western Hemisphere, along with a host of maritime industry leaders will converge on Washington, D.C., April 4-6, to participate in the 2016 Spring Conference of the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) – the unified and recognized voice of seaports in the Americas. Among the conference highlights will be a keynote luncheon address by U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx on April 6…

Can Fracking Waste be Carried on the Water?

The barging industry has the answer. It’s nowhere near as complicated as it seems. As shale gas production continues to ramp up across the United States, millions of gallons of wastewater is created through the process of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. That waste, referred to as shale gas extraction wastewater (SGEWW), or frack water, needs transport to storage and reprocessing facilities around the U.S., including disposal sites in Louisiana, Texas and Ohio. At the moment, the cargo is carried solely by rail and truck.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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