Salvage

Marine salvage is the process of rescuing a ship, its cargo, or other property from peril. Salvage encompasses rescue towing, putting out fires, patching or repairing a ship, refloating a sunken or grounded vessel, moving a disabled vessel in order to clear navigation channels, and raising sunken ships or their cargo. Equipment involved in salvage operations may include cranes, floating dry docks, and support vessels (such as tugboats). Commercial divers may be called upon to perform underwater tasks and monitor progress below the surface.

Protecting the marine environment from pollution from cargoes such as oil or other contaminants is often an important part of salvage activities. Usually the vessel or valuable parts of the vessel or its cargo may be recovered for its resale value, or for scrap. The vast majority of salvage operations are contracted to qualified seamen and engineers working as professional salvors. Usually, contracted agents expect no financial reward unless the salvage operation is at least partially successful.

If salvage is not performed under a contract, then the rescuer must act voluntarily and aside from any legal duty to act, other than the acknowledged duty to render assistance to those in peril at sea or to attend after a collision. If the owner or the owner’s agent is still on the ship, they can refuse offers of assistance. A vessel found entirely deserted or abandoned without hope or intention of recovery is considered derelict and is fair game for anyone who comes across it. It is not true, however, that the rescuer or salvor automatically becomes the owner of the property. The owner always has the option to reclaim his property by paying an appropriate reward.

Tags: Salvage

Livestock carrier Queen Hind, which capsized with 14,000 sheep on board in November, is now at dock after refloating efforts concluded on Tuesday night. (Photo: GSP)

Livestock Carrier Queen Hind Refloated

Operations to raise a livestock carrier that capsized in the Black sea off Romania…

© Erik Ihlenfeld / Adobe Stock

SGS Acquires TTSA's Diving Division

Commercial diving company Subsea Global Solutions (SGS) said it has acquired the…

Image: United States Navy

US Navy Names Cherokee Nation

Gulf Island Shipyard held a keel laying ceremony for the USNS Cherokee Nation (T…

Rock barge ACL 01700 split in half and sunk after grounding near Mile Marker 99 in Berwick, La. earlier this week. Salvage operations have continued day and night. (Photo Alexandria Preston / U.S. Coast Guard)

Vessels Queue Grows as Salvage Continues on the Intracoastal Waterway

Nearly 200 towing vessels and 600 barges are queued on the Intracoastal Waterway…

Members from Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Morgan City’s marine inspections team and investigations team respond to a report of a towing vessel that ran aground on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway at mile marker 99, near Berwick, La., February 3, 2020. The towing vessel company has hired a salvage company to assist the salvage of the barge. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

Towing Vessel Grounds Near Berwick, La.

A section of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway has been closed after a towing vessel…

Houston Ship Channel Shut on Tuesday Morning for Salvage

The Houston Ship Channel was shut on Tuesday morning to raise a fishing vessel that…

Coast Guard Suspends Search for Three Missing Mariners

The search for three missing mariners was called off on Monday after two towing vessels…

Image: Kotug International.

Kotug Tugboats Rescue Drifting Box Ship

Dutch salvage and towage company Kotug said that its two tugs have helped to rescue…

Image: Alfons Håkans

Alfons Håkans Refloats Barge Trias

The harbor towage company in Finland and Estonia Alfons Håkans has successfully refloated…

AdobeStock / © SL Photography

Ecuador Frets Over Sunken Galapagos Barge Salvage

Ecuador's environment minister, Raul Ledesma, said on Monday that a situation involving…

A crew member with the St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command assists with adjustments to fuel lines used to remove fuel from the Golden Ray in St. Simons Sound, Brunswick, Ga. Hot-tapping is an industry-standard method of safely pumping fuel from the vessel. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Paige Hause)

Golden Ray: Lightering of Fuel Completed

The a unified command team has completed the oil pumping of all accessible tanks…

© currahee_shutter / Adobe Stock

Aurelius Backs Ardent Buyout

Alternative direct lender AURELIUS Finance Company has provided financing to support…

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