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Thursday, October 19, 2017

US Navy Destroyer John Finn Delivered

December 9, 2016

  • Ingalls Shipbuilding's 29th Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) sails the Gulf of Mexico during Alpha sea trials. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII)
  • The guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) recently completed the last of three planned sea trials and is scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Navy in December. (Photo: Andrew Young/HII)
  • Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG 113), named for a Pearl Harbor hero and the Navy’s first World War II Medal of Honor recipient, was delivered on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 2016. Signing the document are, from left, Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG 113 ship program manager; Navy Cmdr. Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding officer of DDG 113; and Cmdr. Ben Wilder, former Navy DDG 51 program manager’s representative. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII)
  • John Finn (DDG 113) fires an SM2 BLK IIIA missile during builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Maddelin Angebrand)
  • John Finn (DDG 113), a Flight IIA Arleigh Burke-class ship, will provide increased capabilities over previous DDG 51 destroyers, including advances in antisubmarine warfare, command and control and antisurface warfare. (U.S. Navy photo)
  • Civilians, government contractors and sailors assigned to John Finn (DDG 113) conduct missile test firing during the ship's builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Maddelin Angebrand)
  • Ingalls Shipbuilding's 29th Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) sails the Gulf of Mexico during Alpha sea trials. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding's 29th Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) sails the Gulf of Mexico during Alpha sea trials. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII)
  • The guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) recently completed the last of three planned sea trials and is scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Navy in December. (Photo: Andrew Young/HII) The guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG 113) recently completed the last of three planned sea trials and is scheduled for delivery to the U.S. Navy in December. (Photo: Andrew Young/HII)
  • Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG 113), named for a Pearl Harbor hero and the Navy’s first World War II Medal of Honor recipient, was delivered on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 2016. Signing the document are, from left, Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG 113 ship program manager; Navy Cmdr. Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding officer of DDG 113; and Cmdr. Ben Wilder, former Navy DDG 51 program manager’s representative. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII) Aegis guided missile destroyer John Finn (DDG 113), named for a Pearl Harbor hero and the Navy’s first World War II Medal of Honor recipient, was delivered on the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 2016. Signing the document are, from left, Freddie Joe O’Brien, Ingalls’ DDG 113 ship program manager; Navy Cmdr. Micheal Wagner, prospective commanding officer of DDG 113; and Cmdr. Ben Wilder, former Navy DDG 51 program manager’s representative. (Photo: Lance Davis/HII)
  • John Finn (DDG 113) fires an SM2 BLK IIIA missile during builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Maddelin Angebrand) John Finn (DDG 113) fires an SM2 BLK IIIA missile during builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Maddelin Angebrand)
  • John Finn (DDG 113), a Flight IIA Arleigh Burke-class ship, will provide increased capabilities over previous DDG 51 destroyers, including advances in antisubmarine warfare, command and control and antisurface warfare. (U.S. Navy photo) John Finn (DDG 113), a Flight IIA Arleigh Burke-class ship, will provide increased capabilities over previous DDG 51 destroyers, including advances in antisubmarine warfare, command and control and antisurface warfare. (U.S. Navy photo)
  • Civilians, government contractors and sailors assigned to John Finn (DDG 113) conduct missile test firing during the ship's builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Maddelin Angebrand) Civilians, government contractors and sailors assigned to John Finn (DDG 113) conduct missile test firing during the ship's builder's trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Maddelin Angebrand)

The U.S. Navy has accepted delivery of future guided-missile destroyer USS John Finn (DDG 113) from shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) on December 7, the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor.

 
HII’s Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the Arleigh Burke-class (DDG 51) guided missile destroyer DDG 113 after completing three sets of at-sea and in-port trials which proved the ship's operational readiness. The ship is the 63rd DDG 51-class destroyer and the first of the DDG 51 Flight IIA restart ships.
 
DDG 113 is equipped with Aegis Baseline 9 combat system upgrades, which include an Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capability incorporating Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) 5.0 and Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air. Aegis Baseline 9 IAMD destroyers have increased computing power, along with radar upgrades which improve detection and reaction capabilities against modern anti-air warfare and BMD threats.
 
“Delivery of the future USS John Finn marks the beginning of a new era of production for the Arleigh Burke class,” said Capt. Casey Moton, DDG 51 class program manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. “I'm pleased that this well-built and capable ship will soon be joining the fleet.”
 
The ship's namesake, the late Lt. John Finn, earned the Medal of Honor for heroism displayed during the attacks on Pearl Harbor. During the first attack by Japanese airplanes on Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Finn manned a .50-caliber machine gun in an exposed section under heavy enemy machine gun fire. Although wounded, it was only by specific orders he vacated his post to seek medical attention. Following first aid treatment, he returned to the squadron area and actively supervised the rearming of returning planes. He retired as a lieutenant after 30 years of service and lived to be 100 years old, passing in 2010.
 
“Our shipbuilders are patriots who take pride in each and every one of the ships we build at Ingalls,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “DDG 113 is no exception. John Finn forged a great legacy as he fought valiantly, while wounded, to protect our country. It is an honor for our shipbuilders to build the ship that will carry on that legacy in the U.S. Navy destroyer fleet. Nearly three decades of talented shipbuilders working in the DDG 51 program make me confident DDG 113 will surely honor her namesake.”
 
The signing of the DD 250 document officially transfers custody of the ship from HII to the U.S. Navy. The signing took place during a morning ceremony and included an acknowledgement at 7:38 a.m., remembering the time the attacks began on December 7, 1941.
 
“This is a very unique moment,” said George Nungesser, Ingalls’ DDG 51 program manager. “Years of working with the DDG 51 program has created a team of shipbuilders who truly understand what it means to build these ships. Today they share in the honor of delivering this ship on the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor and are able to take a moment to honor the men and women who will continue to carry on the mission that John Finn and his fellow sailors fought so bravely for. It is a memory that will last forever.”
 
Ingalls has delivered 28 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the U.S. Navy, and the Pascagoula shipyard is currently in production on future destroyers Ralph Johnson (DDG 114), Paul Ignatius (DDG 117), Delbert D. Black (DDG 119) and Frank E. Petersen, Jr. (DDG 121) and under contract for two additional ships awarded as part of the five-ship, multi-year procurement for fiscal years 2013-17.
 
Another seven Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are either under construction or contract at General Dynamics' Bath Iron Works shipyard.
 
As one of the Defense Department's largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all destroyers, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, boats and craft.
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