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Friday, June 22, 2018

Navy News

New Navy Leaders as Trump Takes Office

The Honorable Sean J. Stackley assumed the responsibilities of acting secretary of the Navy Jan. 20, 2017. (U.S. Navy Photo)

The Honorable Sean J. Stackley assumed the responsibilities of acting secretary of the Navy Jan. 20 at noon. Stackley, who served as the assistant secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition) for more than eight years, will carry out the day-to-day responsibilities of the secretary of the Navy until the incoming Trump administration nominates, and Congress confirms, a replacement for Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. The Honorable Thomas W. Hicks, deputy undersecretary of the Navy (Management)…

U.S. Navy College Program App for Mobile Devices

The official Navy College Program logo. Courtesy U.S.Navy

A new application for mobile devices which allows Sailors on-the-go access to many features of the Navy College Program (NCP) is available as of Feb. "The Navy College Program app offers Sailors mobile access to voluntary education planning tools, a counseling scheduler, and applications previously available only through the Navy College Offices or the Virtual Education Center," said Lt. Cmdr. Nick Turner, the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Center's Voluntary Education Program deputy director.

Keeping it in the Navy Family

Photo: Royal Australian Navy

They say Navy is like one big family but when it comes to three people in the west it’s more a case of a family within a family. Lieutenant Commander David Sutherland, (Deputy Officer-In-Charge Fleet Logistic Support Element – Submarines) and his sons Commander Daniel Sutherland (Commanding Officer, submarine HMAS Dechaineux) and Chaplain James Sutherland (HMAS Stirling) are all proud Navy officers based in Western Australia. But the family’s involvement with Navy doesn’t stop at the three Sutherland men, with matriarch, Mrs Frances Sutherland having senior service history also.

Wary of Trump unpredictability, China ramps up naval abilities

(The Chinese Navy destroyer Qingdao (DDG 113) transits the San Diego Harbor as it prepares to moor at Naval Station San Diego. Qingdao along with the Chinese oiler Hongzehu are currently visiting San Diego as part of a goodwill tour. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Marc Rockwell-Pate (RELEASED)

* China still lags U.S. BEIJING, Feb 26 (Reuters) - The PLA Navy is likely to secure significant new funding in China's upcoming defence budget as Beijing seeks to check U.S. dominance of the high seas and step up its own projection of power around the globe. China's navy has been taking an increasingly prominent role in recent months, with a rising star admiral taking command, its first aircraft carrier sailing around self-ruled Taiwan and new Chinese warships popping up in far-flung places. Now, with President Donald Trump promising a U.S.

Navy Female Participation Rate Continues to Climb

Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

Each year on 8 March, Australian Navy joins with institutions and organisations around the world to celebrate International Women’s Day, recognising the achievements and vital role women deliver in the workforce. In 1911, when International Women’s Day began, the only ladies in the fleet were ships. Now, over a century later, women a part of the fabric of Navy, represented across all ranks and in every employment category. The Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, said the day was a chance to build awareness of the obstacles women face.

Russian Navy Chief Visits India

Photo:  Indian Navy

Admiral Vladimir Korolev, Commander-in-Chief, Russian Federation Navy along with a four member Russian Navy delegation is on an official visit to India from 15 to 18 March 2017. The visit aims to consolidate bilateral naval relations between India and Russia, as also to explore new avenues for naval cooperation. During his visit, the Commander-in-Chief of Russian Navy held bilateral discussions with Admiral Sunil Lanba, PVSM, AVSM, ADC, Chief of the Naval Staff and other senior officials of the Indian Navy.

Skilled Workers Needed to Build Trump's Navy Vision

File Image: AdobeStock CREDIT Bogdan Vasilescu

U.S. President Donald Trump says he wants to build dozens of new warships in one of the biggest peace-time expansions of the U.S. Navy. But interviews with ship-builders, unions and a review of public and internal documents show major obstacles to that plan. The initiative could cost nearly $700 billion in government funding, take 30 years to complete and require hiring tens of thousands of skilled shipyard workers - many of whom don't exist yet because they still need to be hired and trained, according to the interviews and the documents reviewed. Trump has vowed a huge build-up of the U.S.

Trump's Navy: A Look at the Future US Navy

President Donald J. Trump speaks with Sailors in the hangar bay aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). Trump visited to meet with Sailors and shipbuilders of the Navy’s first-in-class aircraft carrier during an all-hands call inside the ship’s hangar bay. (U.S. Navy photo by Joshua Sheppard)

It’s still too early to know for certain what the new administration will do about building up the U.S. Navy, as the numbers are a moving target. But with President Trump’s recent pledge to add $54 billion to defense spending, it’s a safe bet to make that the fleet will grow. So let’s start with the numbers. There are different ways to count the fleet size, including whether or not you count auxiliaries, but let’s use this number as the baseline: There are 274 ships in the U.S. Navy now.

Navy's Top Officer Visits Naval Station Rota

Photo: United States Navy

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. John Richardson and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Steven Giordano visited Naval Station Rota, March 27 and 28. During their time in Rota, Richardson and Giordono visited the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, USS Ross (DDG 71), ate lunch with the 2016 Sailors of the Year, viewed a display of Commander, Task Force 68 expeditionary equipment and held an "all-hands call" with installation Sailors, civilians and family members.

New Commander at US Navy Installations Command

Photo: United States Navy

Vice Adm. Mary M. Jackson relieved Vice Adm. Dixon R. Smith at a change of command ceremony for Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) March 31, at the Washington Navy Yard. The ceremony included the presentation of colors by the U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard color guard, national anthem by the U.S. Navy Band and remarks from guest speaker, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson. "While here, I've witnessed firsthand the tremendous dedication of our civilians and Sailors who support the fleet, warfighters and their families," said Smith.

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

U.S. Navy Relieves Seventh Fleet Commander

A file image of the USS John S. McCain returning to port.

The U.S. Navy on Wednesday said it had removed Seventh Fleet Commander Vice Admiral Joseph Aucoin after a series of collisions involving its warships in Asia as the search goes on for 10 sailors missing since the latest mishap. Aucoin's removal comes after a pre-dawn collision between a guided-missile destroyer and a merchant vessel east of Singapore and Malaysia on Monday, the fourth major incident in the U.S. Pacific Fleet this year. "Admiral Scott Swift, commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet…

Florida Navy Bases Prepare for Irma

Photo: United States Navy

Navy installations throughout Florida are preparing for heavy weather as Hurricane Irma approaches South Florida. Commander, Navy Region Southeast, Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, directed the evacuation of non-essential personnel and family members from Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, Sept. 5. "Their safety and security is a top priority," Bolivar said. Approximately 50-60 mission essential personnel are remaining behind to maintain essential functions on the installation. Naval Air Station Key West personnel have a designated safe haven area of within 300 miles of Atlanta.

U.S. Navy Carrier Drills with Japanese Navy

File Image: The USS Ronald Reagan underway (U.S. Navy)

The U.S. Navy carrier Ronald Reagan is conducting drills with Japanese warships in seas south of the Korean peninsula, Japan's military said on Friday, in a show of naval power as Pyongyang threatens further nuclear and missile tests. The Reagan strike group will conduct a separate drill with the South Korean Navy in October, the defence ministry said in a statement distributed to South Korean lawmakers on Monday. The 100,000-ton Reagan, which is based in Japan, and its escort…

Australian Navy Commissions Hobart (II) – One in a Million

HMAS Hobart returning to Sydney Harbour for the last time prior to being decommisioned. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

Royal Australian Navy will commission the first of three new destroyers today (On 23 September). In continuing our reflective stories of previous ships that have carried the name HMAS Hobart, this is the story of Hobart (II). The second ship to bear the name Hobart was one of three Perth class guided missile destroyers built in the United States for the Royal Australian Navy. She was commissioned at the Boston Navy Yard on 18 December 1965 under the command of Captain Guy Griffiths.

Wicker Calls for 355-Ship Navy

U.S. Senator Roger Wicker, R-Miss.

Speaking in front of the Senate, U.S. Senator Roger Wicker, R-Miss., Chairman of the Senate Seapower Subcommittee, said the requirement for a 355-ship Navy is clear, especially in light of the recent, fatal accidents involving the USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain. In response to these incidents, the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral John Richardson, directed that a comprehensive review take place. On Tuesday, Wicker and other members of the Senate Armed Services Committee have been briefed on those findings. The Navy is scheduled to make the review public later this week.

Ex-US Navy Officers Face Negligent Homicide Charges over Ship Collisions

Significant visible damage to USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21. (U.S. Navy photo by Madailein Abbott)

The commanding officers of two U.S. Navy destroyers involved in deadly collisions last year in the Pacific Ocean face courts-martial and military criminal charges including negligent homicide, the U.S. Navy said in a statement on Tuesday. Filing charges against the officers marks the Navy’s latest effort to address the problems that led to collisions involving its warships in Asia, in which 17 sailors were killed. The Navy has already dismissed several senior officers, including the commander of the Seventh Fleet, as a result of the collisions.

US Navy Commander Pleads Guilty in 'Fat Leonard' Scandal

Cmdr. Troy Amundson (right) in 2010 (U.S. Navy photo by Jessica Bidwell)

A former commander has become the latest U.S. Navy official to plead guilty in a wide-ranging corruption and fraud investigation involving the foreign defense contractor known as “Fat Leonard”. In what has become the largest corruption scandal in U.S. Navy history, former U.S. Navy commander Troy Amundson pleaded guilty on Tuesday to conspiracy to commit bribery, admitting that he conspired with foreign defense contractor Leonard Glenn Francis, a.k.a. “Fat Leonard,” and his Singapore-based company…

Energy Action Month Reinforces Navy's Energy Resiliency

A U.S. Navy graphic provided by the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division for Navy Energy Action Month. (U.S. Navy photo Release)

Through a presidential proclamation, October has been designated as Energy Action Month to stress the importance of energy for our nation's economic vitality today and for a sustainable future. The Department of Navy's Energy Action Month theme for 2016 is "Power. Presence." This theme illustrates the strong connection between the Navy and Marine Corps' wise use of energy and our ability to be when and where we're needed for national security and humanitarian assistance missions worldwide.

Team Navy Sailors Impress at Bathurst

Royal Australian Navy Officers met with Team Navy Mechanic Seaman Dale Tyce-Nelson on the starting Grid at Bathurst on Race Day. Photo:  Royal Australian Navy

Australian Navy made its mark in the sky and on the ground at this year’s Supercheap Auto Bathurst 1000 supercars race. Building on the year-round Team Navy technical sailor out-placement program with Prodrive Racing Australia, Navy also supported the event with helicopters adding to the spectacle. Three sailors – an electronics technician, an aviation maintainer and a marine technician - are spending a year applying their Navy trade skills to a motorsport environment. Able Seaman Avionics Technician Aircraft Aaron Armbruster…

US Navy: 355-Ship Fleet is the Mandate, Funding It is Fuzzy

(U.S. Navy photo by Morgan K. Nall)

As Congress wrestles with the budget, there is at least a bipartisan consensus that defense spending should grow, and that includes growing the Navy’s fleet. The current goal is 355 ships, an admirable goal, but an objective that faces many cost hurdles. The surface fleet (which excludes submarines and aircraft carriers) needs to grow in capability and capacity. The numbers of ships being procured or envisions would increase as the total n umber of ships increases, but the number in this story represents current program status.

Australian Navy Rolls out New Council

The Council, launched by Deputy Chief of Navy on 27 October will provide leadership as Navy’s peak decision-making body for guiding and monitoring the implementation of the Navy Diversity and Inclusion Strategy (2014-19). Photo:  Royal Australian Navy

Royal Australian Navy’s drive to develop a modern and diverse workforce has accelerated with the launch of the Navy Diversity and Inclusion Council. The Council, launched by Deputy Chief of Navy will provide leadership as Navy’s peak decision-making body for guiding and monitoring the implementation of the Navy Diversity and Inclusion Strategy (2014-19). It will provide strategic guidance on priority areas and ensure that diversity and inclusion programs are aligned to critical workforce requirements that will deliver a capability edge for Navy.

Former US Navy Official Sentenced for Bribery

A former supervisory contracting officer was sentenced to 72 months in prison today for accepting bribe payments in exchange for steering U.S. Navy contracts to the president and chief executive officer of a defense contractor. Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Laura E. Duffy of the Southern District of California, Director Andrew L. Traver of the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and Director Dermot F. O’Reilly of the Defense Criminal Investigative Service (DCIS) made the announcement. Paul Simpkins, 62, of Haymarket, Va., was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Janis L.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Green Marine Technology

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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