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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Alan Shepard News

General Dynamics NASSCO Launches USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3)

U.S. Navy's newest resupply ship, USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3). named in honor of the first American astronaut in space. first U.S. Navy ship ever to be named after an astronaut. The ceremony took place in San Diego at the NASSCO shipyard. John H. of Staff, was the principal speaker for the ceremony. Mrs. it during the morning ceremony. Anders and Eugene Cernan -- were also in attendance. 1944. 1959. landing. He retired from NASA and the Navy as a rear admiral in 1974. scholarships. cargo- ammunition ships for the Navy. T-AKE ships. delivered to the Navy on June 20. operating costs over its projected 40-year service life. Construction of USNS Alan Shepard began in September of 2005. summer of 2007. sea. fuel.

General Dynamics NASSCO Delivers USNS Alan Shepard

General Dynamics NASSCO delivered USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3) to the U.S. Navy. The ship is named in honor of the late Mercury and Apollo astronaut. USNS Alan Shepard will remain in San Diego for about three months to conduct crew familiarization and final outfitting. The ship will be part of the Navy’s Military Sealift Command fleet and will operate in support of the Navy’s Pacific Fleet. With a cargo capacity of more than 10,000 tons, Alan Shepard’s primary mission will be to deliver food, ammunition, fuel and other provisions from shore stations to combat ships at sea. The Alan Shepard is the third in an expected class of 11 dry cargo-ammunition ships for the Navy. Construction of the 689-foot-long ship began in September 2005.

Navy Christens USNS Alan Shepard

Military Sealift Command (MSC) advanced auxiliary dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3) slides backwards into San Diego Bay during a christening ceremony held at the National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO). The Shepard is the third Lewis and Clark class supply ship to be launched and is scheduled to join the fleet next summer. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Patrick M. The Navy christened USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3), the newest ship in the Lewis and Clark class of underway replenishment ships Dec. 6, during a launching at General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO), San Diego. The ship honors the first American in space, Rear Adm. Alan B. Shepard Jr.

Navy to Honor Alan Shepard in Naming New Ship

The U.S. Navy will honor New Hampshire astronaut Alan Shepard by naming a new combat support ship after him. The state's congressional delegation announced the tribute Friday. The USS Shepard is being built in San Diego by National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. It will join the Navy fleet in March 2007. It will be 1,000 feet long and its primary mission will be to deliver supplies to Navy ships, transfer cargo, and provide logistical support within a carrier strike group. Shepard served in the Navy and NASA. He became the first American in space in 1961. Ten years later, he led the Apollo 16 mission to the moon.

Navy to Name Ship after Alan Shepard

The U.S. Navy will honor New Hampshire astronaut Alan Shepard by naming a new combat support ship after him. The USS Shepard is being built in San Diego by National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. It will join the Navy fleet in March 2007. It will be 1,000 feet long and its primary mission will be to deliver supplies to Navy ships, transfer cargo, and provide logistical support within a carrier strike group. Shepard was born and raised in Derry and served in the Navy and NASA. He became the first American in space in 1961. Ten years later, he led the Apollo 16 mission to the moon. (Source: www.boston.com)

Keel-Laying of Third T-AKE Ship

U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Carol M. Pottenger, Commander, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command, was the honoree for the keel-laying event, welding her initials into the keel of the T-AKE 3, the USNS Alan Shepard. With her are Dave Morton, Program Manager, Naval Fleet Auxiliary Force Program (L) and Art Diaz, MSC Ship Construction Senior Owners Representative. General Dynamics NASSCO on February 14, 2006, held the keel-laying ceremony for USNS Alan Shepard, the third ship in the U.S. Navy’s T-AKE program. Designated the Lewis and Clark class, the new T-AKE ships fulfill combat logistics force requirements. The keel-laying ceremony is a NASSCO tradition, signifying an important milestone as a new ship begins to take shape on the company’s building ways.

This Day in Naval History – May 5

1944 - USS Comfort is commissioned in San Pedro, CA; first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy personnel 1948 - VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (USS Saipan) 1961 - CDR Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Flight of Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) which lasted 15 minutes and 28 seconds reached the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a velocity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)-262 from USS Lake Champlain(CVS-39). 1980 - USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refugees from disabled craft south of Thailand (Source: Navy News Service)

Today in U.S. Naval History: May 5

Today in U.S. Naval History - May 5 1944 - USS Comfort is commissioned in San Pedro, Calif.; first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy personnel 1948 - VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (USS Saipan) 1961 - Cdr. Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Flight of Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) which lasted 15 minutes and 28 seconds reached the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a velocity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)-262 from USS Lake Champlain(CVS-39). 1980 - USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refugees from disabled craft south of Thailand For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

This Day in Naval History – May 5

1944 - USS Comfort is commissioned in San Pedro, CA; first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy personnel 1948 - VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (USS Saipan) 1961 - CDR Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Flight of Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) which lasted 15 minutes and 28 seconds reached the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a velocity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)-262 from USS Lake Champlain(CVS-39). 1980 - USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refugees from disabled craft south of Thailand (Source: Navy News Service)

Cascade General Wins $9m Contract

Cascade General Portland Shipyard, Portland, Ore., is being awarded a $9,052,654 firm-fixed-price contract for a 70-day post shipyard availability (PSA) of Military Sealift Fleet Support Command's dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard to undergo a number of modifications that could not be economically accomplished under the ship construction contract. Naval Sea Systems PMS 325 provided funding for the alterations to be completed during the PSA. The ship’s primary mission is to operate as part of a carrier strike group, providing fuel, ammunition, and dry and refrigerated stores to support U.S. Navy ships at sea. The contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $10,792,644.

BAE San Francisco Wins Navy Contract

BAE Systems San Francisco Ship Repair, San Francisco, Calif., is being awarded a $12,257,163 firm-fixed-price contract for a 55-calendar day regular overhaul and dry-docking of Military Sealift Command's dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard. Some of the major work items include dry-docking and undocking the ship, repairing interior decks, structural repairs, overhauling the main diesel generators, and inspecting and refurbishing the propeller shaft and stern tube. The ship's primary mission is to provide fuel, ammunition, and dry and refrigerated stores to support Navy ships at sea, enabling them to remain underway for extended periods. This contract includes options, which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $14,321,064.

General Dynamics NASSCO Starts Construction of Seventh T-AKE Ship

General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics announced the start of construction on the seventh dry cargo-ammunition ship in the U.S. Navy's T-AKE program. The ship is scheduled to be delivered to the Navy in the first quarter of 2009. Since June 2006, NASSCO has delivered USNS Lewis and Clark (T-AKE 1) and USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2) to the Navy. The third ship of the class, USNS Alan Shepard, and the recently-launched USNS Richard E. Byrd will also be delivered to the Navy by the end of 2007. The T-AKE class is expected to include 11 ships for the Military Sealift Command fleet.

USNS Richard E. Byrd Delivered

General Dynamics NASSCO, a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), delivered USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4) to the U.S. Navy. The ship is the third T-AKE-class ship delivered by the San Diego shipyard in 2007, the fourth overall. USNS Richard E. Byrd is the fourth in an expected class of 14 dry cargo-ammunition ships for the Navy. Construction of the 689-foot-long ship began in February 2006. NASSCO has incorporated international marine technologies and commercial ship-design features into the T-AKE class ships, including an integrated electric-drive propulsion system, to minimize operating costs during their projected 40-year service life.

NASSCO Lays Keel of T-AKE Ship

General Dynamics NASSCO held a keel-laying ceremony for the fourth ship in the U.S. Navy’s T-AKE program. The ship is named USNS Richard E. Byrd in honor of the U.S. Navy admiral who explored the South Pole and Antarctica. It will be part of the Lewis and Clark-class of dry cargo-ammunition ships. Debbie Hamilton, the wife of Rear Adm. Charles Hamilton II, the Navy’s Program Executive Officer for Ships, was the honoree for the event and welded her initials into the keel. The Richard E. Byrd is scheduled to be delivered to the Navy in the fourth quarter of 2007. At the ceremony, Rear Adm. Hamilton announced Secretary of the Navy Donald Winter’s decision to name T-AKE 4 after the famed South Pole explorer and to name the fifth ship of the class the USNS Robert E. Peary.

This Day In Naval History: May 5

USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE-14) was christened and launched at General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Company's shipyard in San Diego, May 5, 2012 (U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Jasmine Sheard)

1943 - USS Permit (SS 178), USS Snook (SS 279) and USS Sawfish (SS 276) damage two Japanese ships and sink two freighters and a gunboat. 1944 - The hospital ship, USS Comfort (AH-6), is commissioned at San Pedro, Calif., and is the first ship to be manned jointly by U.S. Army and U.S. Navy personnel. 1948 - Fighter Squadron Seventeen A (VF-17A), with 16 FH-1 Phantoms, becomes the first carrier-qualified jet squadron in the U.S. Navy. 1961 - Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr. makes the first U.S. manned space flight. USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39) recovers the capsule after the 15 minute flight.

This Day in Navy History

October 1, 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his service. 1937 - Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. With change five patrol wings were established as separate administrative command over their squadrons.

This Day in Naval History – October 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his service. 1937 - Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. With change five patrol wings were established as separate administrative command over their squadrons.

Today in U.S. Naval History: October 1

USS Independence (CV-62). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Today in U.S. 1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until October 1, 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his service.

This Day in Naval History - Oct. 01

1800 - schooner Experiment captures French schooner Diana. 1844 - The Naval Observatory, headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury, occupies its first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser Lt. J.Q. Barton is given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a pay department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until Oct. 1, 1877, when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. 1880 - John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band. 1928 - The first class at school for enlisted Navy and Marine Corps radio intercept operators (The "On the Roof Gang") is held. 1937 - Patrol aviation is transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a re-established type command.

This Day in Naval History - Oct. 1

1800 - U.S. schooner Experiment captures French schooner Diana. 1844 - The Naval Observatory, headed by Lt. Matthew Fontaine Maury, occupies its first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser Lt. J.Q. Barton is given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a pay department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until Oct. 1, 1877, when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. 1880 - John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band. 1928 - The first class at school for enlisted Navy and Marine Corps radio intercept operators (The "On the Roof Gang") is held. 1937 - Patrol aviation is transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a re-established type command.

NASSCO Starts Construction of Sixth T-AKE Ship

General Dynamics NASSCOannounced the start of construction on the sixth dry cargo-ammunition ship in the U.S. Navy's T-AKE program. The ship is scheduled to be delivered to the Navy in the fourth quarter of 2008. The lead ship of the class, USNS Lewis and Clark (T-AKE 1), was delivered to the Navy last June. The second ship, USNS Sacagawea, will go to sea for Builder's Trials on December 14 and will be delivered to the Navy in the first quarter of 2007. The third ship, USNS Alan Shepard, was launched on December 6, and is scheduled to be delivered in the second quarter of 2007. The fourth and fifth T-AKE ships, currently under construction, are the Richard E. Byrd and Robert E. Peary, respectively.

General Dynamics NASSCO Starts Construction of Fifth T-AKE Ship

General Dynamics NASSCO, a subsidiary of General Dynamics announced the start of construction on the fifth dry cargo-ammunition ship in the U.S. Navy’s T-AKE program. The ship will be named later and is scheduled to be delivered to the Navy in the first quarter of 2008. NASSCO has been awarded contracts to build nine T-AKE ships. Two additional ships are expected to be ordered by the Navy over the next two years for a total class of 11 ships. The first ship of the class, USNS Lewis and Clark , was delivered to the Navy on June 20. The second ship, USNS Sacagawea , was launched on June 24 and is scheduled to be delivered in the first quarter of 2007. The third ship, USNS Alan Shepard , is scheduled to be launched on December 5, 2006, and delivered in the summer of 2007.

This Day in Naval History – Oct. 1

1800 - U.S. Schooner Experiment captures French Schooner Diana. 1844 - Naval Observatory headed by LT Matthew Fontaine Maury occupies first permanent quarters. 1874 - Supply Corps purser, LT J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1 October 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. In 1878, the Emperor of Japan conferred on him the Fourth Class of Rising Sun for his service. 1937 - Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. With change five patrol wings were established as separate administrative command over their squadrons.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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