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Sunday, January 21, 2018

Cascade General News

Cascade to Build 120MW Power Barge

Cascade General was awarded the contract for construction of a 120MW power barge for MAN B&W Diesel AG of Augsberg, Germany. The floating diesel power station will be built for operation in Guatemala, and is a self-contained mobile power generation unit comprised of seven MAN B&W type 18V 48/60 diesel generators mounted on a deck barge which measures 279 x 204 x 11.8 ft. "This is a large - and in many ways significant - project, which shows Cascade General's ability to compete in the international market for newbuilds," said Cascade executive vice-president Suren Menon. The seven generating sets will be housed in an engine hall, which will be prefabricated at Cascade General. A steel deckhouse structure will accommodate control room, offices, workshops, supplies and electrical facilities.

Cascade Signs Maintenance/Repair Agreement

Cascade General and Alaska Tanker Company (ATC) have signed an alliance agreement for the maintenance and repair of ATC's fleet of Alaska North Slope (ANS) tankers. The non-exclusive agreement commits ATC to sending a majority of its vessels to Cascade General's Portland Shipyard for drydocking over the next two years and also earmarks 50 percent of its voyage repairs to be performed by Cascade General outside of the shipyard at remote locations. Cascade has already performed several major overhauls for ATC in 1999, including biennial drydockings of the S/S Denali, Overseas Ohio and Overseas New York.

Cammell Laird Extends Repair Reach West

Following quickly on the heels of an overseas investment deal in Marseilles, Cammell Laird (Holdings) has increased its involvement in the overseas repair and conversion industries by taking a $7.7 million (49%) equity stake in a new holding company along with United States' West Coast shiprepairer Cascade General. This deal has an option for Cammell Laird to take a controlling interest within the next two years. The deal will allow the new company to purchase the repair facility (freehold and docks) at Portland, Oregon, the largest single repair facility on the U.S. West Coast. The facility is currently owned by Portland Port Authority and operated by Cascade General.

Portland-based Yard Completes NOAA Refurb Job

In just the past year, Cascade General Inc., a Portland, Ore., shipyard, has completed refurbishing one research ship for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and begun work on a second ship. "Refurbishing these ships is a win-win situation," said retired Navy Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher Jr., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. "NOAA gains two modernized ships to help carry out its survey and science missions, while helping to create jobs and stimulate the economy in Portland." Lautenbacher will visit the shipyard today to see how work is progressing on the NOAA ship Fairweather. Fairweather is a hydrographic survey ship first commissioned in 1968, but has been inactive for more than 12 years.

News: Cascade Completes NOAA Refurb Job

In the past year, Cascade General Inc. of Portland, Ore., has completed refurbishing one research ship for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and begun work on a second ship. "Refurbishing these ships is a win-win situation," said retired Navy Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher Jr., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. "NOAA gains two modernized ships to help carry out its survey and science missions, while helping to create jobs and stimulate the economy in Portland." Lautenbacher recently visited the shipyard to see how work was progressing on the NOAA ship Fairweather. Fairweather is a hydrographic survey ship first commissioned in 1968, but has been inactive for more than 12 years.

Cascade General Performing Repairs To Bulk Carrier

During its run along the Columbia River to unload steel in Vancouver, Wash., a 568 ft. (173 m), 36,788-ton Turkish bulk carrier, Cenk Kaptanoglu collided with the BHP dock in Kalama, Wash., sustaining damages to its bow and port side. Running from the starboard hawse pipe to diagonally across the bow to the portside of number one hold, the force of the damage's impact also partially collapsed the port side of the foredeck. Following emergency patching and partial discharge of cargo, the injured vessel underwent an exhaustive survey, in addition to further consultations between the U.S. Coast Guard and Kapatanoglu Shipping Group, which resulted in the carrier being moved by Portland Shipyard to Cascade General.

Cascade General Granted Post-Turnover of USNS Rainier

Cascade General Inc., Portland, Ore., is to be Awarded a $6,192,763 firm-fixed-price contract for the post-turnover shipyard availability of the USNS Rainier. Work will be performed in Portland, Ore., and is expected to be completed in December 2003. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with five proposals solicited and two offers received. The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, headquartered in Washington, D.C. is the contracting activity (N62383-03-C2271).

Bollinger Added to NSRP

The Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice issued a Notice stating that the membership of the National Shipbuilding Research Program has changed. Bollinger Shipyards, Inc. of Lockport, Louisiana has been added. Cascade General, Inc. of Portland, Oregon has been deleted. 69 Fed. Reg. 10263 (March 4, 2004).

Generator Replacement Proves Cascade General Capabilities

Cascade General had its knowledge and expertise put to the test with the emergency replacement of a faulty generator on P&O's Sea Princess. Measuring 857 ft. (261.2 m), the vessel, which was built by Fincantieri in 1998, was in drydock at the Portland shipyard for approximately nine days in September. The project began on the vessel's exterior with the rigging crew building a 20-ft. loading platform on the drydock floor. Concurrently, work was completed inside the engine room to clear an exit path for the 47-ton GEC Alstom generator. Two of Sea Princess' four propulsion transformers at 20-tons each, were disconnected and moved aside, catwalks lifted and all wiring and piping blocking the exit route labeled and cut.

Ship Repair & Conversion Report

Subsequent to the departure of Holland America's Statendam in April, Cascade General took in Crystal Cruises' Crystal Harmony for a 10-day stopover in May. The 10-year-old ship underwent maintenance and overhaul work below its waterline, extensive interior remodeling and steel replacement for pool areas on Deck 11. With maximization of work in mind, Cascade normally sends advanced crews to join cruise ships on their way to the yard's Portland, Ore. locale. This time though, the first mobile crew met the ship in Los Angeles, where work commenced immediately on an overhaul of one of Harmony's auxiliary boilers. A second team was then summoned to San Francisco to clean ballast tanks before undertaking structural repairs and preservation work. easuring 790 ft.

Grand Bahama Shipyard Floating Dock Departs Cascade General

Grand Bahama Shipyard's Floating Dock No. two, known as the form Portland Floating Dock No. four, left the Cascade General Portland Shipyard in Oregon on Friday, July 6 to commence its five-and-a-half month tow to its new home at the Grand Bahama Shipyard in Freeport, Bahamas. Measuring 984 x 2.296 ft. (300 x 700 m), the floating dock is capable of lifting 87,000 tons and is one of the largest in the western hemisphere able to accommodate vessels of up to 150,000 grt or 250,000 dwt. Via a marine management contract with Seaspan, the yard has chartered Global Towing Alliance Ocean Going Tug, De Yue. Measuring 299 ft. (91 m) with installed power of 20,800 bhp, De Yue provides a bollard pull of 200 tons from a twin-screw configuration.

Cascade General Wins $9m Contract

Cascade General Portland Shipyard, Portland, Ore., is being awarded a $9,052,654 firm-fixed-price contract for a 70-day post shipyard availability (PSA) of Military Sealift Fleet Support Command's dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Alan Shepard to undergo a number of modifications that could not be economically accomplished under the ship construction contract. Naval Sea Systems PMS 325 provided funding for the alterations to be completed during the PSA. The ship’s primary mission is to operate as part of a carrier strike group, providing fuel, ammunition, and dry and refrigerated stores to support U.S. Navy ships at sea. The contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $10,792,644.

Cammell Laird Expected To Set Bond Price

British shipbuilder Cammell Laird Holdings Plc is expected to price its high-yield bond issue at around 11.5 percent, sources familiar with the deal said on Thursday. The bond issue of 125 million euros ($109 million) of 10-year senior notes, non-callable for five years, will be launched early next week. Cammell Laird will use the proceeds to repay existing debt and part-fund acquisitions. The company has recently been expanding into the U.S. and Europe, signing a long-term deal with the French port of Marseilles and an initial agreement with U.S. firm Cascade General Inc. The bond issue, lead-managed by Donaldson, Lufkin and Jenrette comes after Cammell Laird raised about $20 million through a share placing in August.

U.S. Lines' MS Patriot Challenges Cascade General

Since 1999, when American Classic Voyages (AMCV) first announced its intention to construct two U.S.-flagged cruise ships that would be staffed by American officers and crew, the U.S. shipbuilding industry received a boost back into an area that it had not participated for almost 30 years — the cruise shipping market. Prior to the construction of the two vessels by Litton Ingalls Shipbuilding, AMCV wanted to start making money right away — it purchased the 17-year-old ms Nieuw Amsterdam for $114.5 million from Holland America. AMCV then received an official notice from Congress that provided exemption from the Jones Act, thus allowing the U.S. Coast Guard to re-flag the foreign registered vessel.

Government Ships Spend Time At Cascade

This past winter, Portland, Ore.-based Cascade General saw the arrival of several government-owned vessels from homeports such as Southern California and Alaska. The 418-ft. (127.4-m) M.V. Columbia, owned by Alaska Marine Highways was at Cascade for most of the winter for modernization of its public areas in the restaurant and café, refurbishment of the car-deck doors, installation of a laundry elevator from the car to cabin deck, and replacement of all windows in the vessel's solarium. The 30-year-old vessel will undergo an upgrade consisting of new furnishings and food-serving facilities, as well as replacement of galley equipment. Columbia, which carries 941 passengers and 174 cars on the Inland Passage from Bellingham, Wash. to Skagway, Alaska, operates during the summer months.

Grand Bahama Floating Dock Departs Cascade

Grand Bahama Shipyard's Floating Dock No. two, known as the former Portland Floating Dock No. four, left the Cascade General Portland Shipyard in Oregon on Friday, July 6 to commence its five-and-a-half month tow to its new home at the Grand Bahama Shipyard in Freeport, Bahamas. Measuring 984 x 2.296 ft. (300 x 700 m), the floating dock is capable of lifting 87,000 tons and is one of the largest in the western hemisphere able to accommodate vessels of up to 150,000 grt or 250,000 dwt. Via a marine management contract with Seaspan, the yard has chartered Global Towing Alliance Ocean Going Tug, De Yue. Measuring 299 ft. (91 m) with installed power of 20,800 bhp, De Yue provides a bollard pull of 200 tons from a twin-screw configuration.

Cascade General Completes Upgrades to M.V. Columbia

The 418 ft. ferry M.V. Columbia, owned by the State of Alaska, has returned to service on the Bellingham-Skagway run after a winter layover at Cascade General. The thirty-year old ship emerged from the Portland Shipyard with a re-designed restaurant and cafeteria, re-furbished car-deck doors, renovated solarium, and with a laundry conveyor/elevator installed above the car deck. Both food-service areas were re-built from the deck up, with new floors, carpets, booths, Gage ceilings, and designer lighting. The restaurant dining room features an 11 ft.-diameter dome light over a buffet counter, stainless steel case work, and an improved layout for the serving staff. The restaurant galley's cooking equipment was all upgraded, and now vents into a full-length Gaylord stainless steel hood.

Victoria Shipyard Racks Up Cruise Ship Jobs

First making headlines this past summer, when the Vancouver-based yard performed the emergency pod repair on Celebrity's Infinity, Victoria Shipyards has booked an additional five cruise vessels that are scheduled for routine repairs and drydockings from May 9 through the middle of October. With the departure of Cascade General's Number Four drydock last year to Grand Bahama Island, Victoria has gained a foothold in the realm of West Coast ship repair for cruise vessels that frequent the Alaska and Vancouver areas. According to Malcolm Barker, Victoria's manager of Ship Repair, the yard has scheduled five cruise vessels for the remainder of 2002, beginning with Princess Cruises' Dawn Princess, which will arrive on May 9 for 10 days.

M/V Columbia Returns to Service

M/V Columbia, reported to be the largest ship in the Alaska Marine Highway’s fleet, returned to revenue service on June 5 with its scheduled sailing southbound from Ketchikan. The Columbia begins weekly round trip service between Bellingham, Wash. and Skagway, Alaska, with intermediate stops in Ketchikan, Wrangell, Petersberg, Juneau, Haines and Skagway with additional southbound stops in Sitka. Columbia left Cascade General Inc., (CGI) shipyard in Portland, Ore., on May 30 on schedule and within budget, after a major improvement project. In recognition of CGI’s efforts, the AMHS Vessel operations manager, Captain Jack Meyers, presented Bruce Dummer, senior V.P. of Finance, with an oversized replica of a $14,000 incentive check in a ceremony at the yard just prior to the ship’s departure.

Dock Starts 170-Day Journey

On July 2 the ex-Portland Dock # 4, now the Grand Bahama Shipyard Dock # 2, departed Portland,Ore., bound for it's new home at the Grand Bahama Shipyard Ltd. in Freeport, Grand Bahama. Under a marine management contract with Grand Bahama Shipyard (GBSY), Seaspan has chartered the Global Towing Alliance Ocean Going Tug "De Yue". The 'De Yue' is a 20,800 bhp, 200-mt BP, twin screw deep sea salvage tug owned by Guangzhou Salvage of China and is uniquely suited for a tow of this magnitude due to her high BHP and her large bunker capacity. The 'De Yue' is expected to take approximately 170 days encompassing approximately 20,000 NM with an average tow speed of about 5.5 knots. Routing is specifically designed to avoid major weather patterns in each of the Pacific, Indian and Atlantic Oceans.

Cruise Ship Remains Stuck on Bar near Washougal

The Empress of the North lost a lot of weight on March 25, but the stubborn sternwheeler refused to budge from her perch on a Columbia River sandbar. Rescuers had a simple plan to save the 360-foot ship, which grounded near Washougal, Wash., on the morning of March 24. They would drain most of the ship's diesel fuel, then hope the reduced weight and a rising afternoon tide would lift the Empress enough to maneuver downstream. It took crews hours longer than they thought to drain more than 20,000 gallons of diesel, partly because of a mechanical problem. Still, the Empress stayed stuck, even when three tugboats teamed up to yank and pivot the ship off its perch. Rescuers may try to come up with a new plan or may give the tugs another try.

Passenger Vessel Freed

Armed with binoculars, telescopes and cameras, spectators on March 26 documented the play-by-play of the afternoon freeing of the cruise ship Empress of the North. Since the morning of March 24, the 360-foot sternwheeler was lodged into a Columbia River sandbar about 350 yards from the shores of Washougal. At 3:36 p.m. on March 26, two Coast Guard tugboats led the ship to the Cascade General Portland Shipyard on Swan Island, where the ship will be assessed for damage, OregonLive.com reported. For most of the weekend, the docks in this city of 10,100 were filled with people who had the same excuse -- nothing better to do. On March 25, crews emptied about 20,000 gallons of fuel to lighten the ship. The next day, they waited for high tide to dislodge the ship's bow from the sandbar.

Safety Pays Off for SCA Shipyards

Injury and illness incident rates at shipyards that belong to the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA) have, for the fifth consecutive year, stayed below the industry average. to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). SCA has an active Safety Committee that reviews the results of each quarterly survey and holds bi-annual safety seminars to address the areas where most injuries occur. naval shipyards and the importance of worker orientation programs. annual safety record. number of hours worked. average are eligible for awards. Industries, Inc., headquartered in Morgan City, LA. had a TRIR below the association’s average.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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