Marine Link
Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Drone Technology News

Singapore, Wilhelmsen Ships Service Pact for Maritime Drone

Photo: Wilhelmsen Ships Service

Wilhelmsen Ships Service has been selected to help develop the future Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) regulatory framework for Singapore and will receive dedicated funding for their shore-to-ship delivery project.Wilhelmsen Ships Service is one of only four companies to have received the funding, following a Call-For-Proposal (CFP) by CAAS and the Ministry of Transport. The CFP aims to support the development of systems and technologies to enable innovations within the wide-ranging use of UAS.

The Drones are Coming

An ABS technician with a drone. Source: ABS

Nimble and quick, unmanned aerial vehicles have evolved into a valuable tool for marine and offshore applications.When a U.S. oil tanker conducts a Critical Area Inspection Plan (CAIP) as required by ABS, it is an onerous process. For example, each tank requires seven days of set up with scaffolding and staging. An ABS inspector and UDT technicians must access, and be carefully lowered into the tank with instrumentation and tools. Inspection points in far reaching places are surveyed.

ClassNK Awards Class Approval To RIMS

Photo: Rims BV

RIMS (Robotics In Maintenance Strategies) continues in their quest in the practical integration of drone technology in the world maritime surveying with yet another class society approval for the use of Remote Inspection Techniques (drones) during surveys of enclosed spaces, this time from ClassNK.Over the past 12 months RIMS have successfully secured class approvals from multiple societies; Bureau Veritas, Lloyd’s Register, ABS, RINA, KRS and now ClassNK.The certification for the use of Remote Inspection Techniques (drones) during surveys of enclosed spaces…

Denmark Studies Autonomous Shipping

In the future, autonomous ships may have a central role to play in Denmark. A pre-analysis made by the Danish Technological University (DTU) and the Danish Maritime Authority points to the need to develop technological solutions. As the entire transport sector vigorously strives to develop autonomous solutions, many developments have come a long way, especially for cars and trucks. The shipping industry too will see more new autonomous technology solutions, just as drone technology will become more widespread. The Danish Maritime Authority has therefore cooperated with the DTU to consider the development potential of autonomous ships in more detail. “Blue Denmark must – just as the rest of the Danish business sector – be frontrunners within technological developments.

Maersk Delivers Cookies to a Tanker...by Drone

Photo: Maersk Group

Drones could cut time and costs for deliveries and inspections across the Maersk Group – but they must be reliable and absolutely safe. Maersk Tankers is testing delivery to vessels on drones that have been certified for explosive environments. Markus Kuhn peers out through the fog and spots the Maersk Edgar waiting across the chilly Danish waters. Drone operator Thierry Bauer, dressed against the winter cold after a long journey from his centre of operations in Southern France, carefully attaches the cargo of Maersk cookies to its transport.

DNV GL Focus on Digitalization at Nor-Shipping

L to R Knut rbeck-Nilssen CEO DNV GL  Maritime Remi Eriksen DNV GL Group President  CEO Pierre Sames Group Technology  Research Director. Pic: DNV GL

DNV GL held it’s traditional press conference at the Nor-Shipping trade fair today. This year, the event took place on the Vision of the Fjords, a DNV GL-classed carbon fiber hybrid ferry. The content showcased DNV GL’s innovative vision, with attendees taking part in a virtual reality (VR) presentation, which showed how DNV GL is pushing ahead with a digital transformation to improve the quality and efficiency of its services, as well as the emerging solutions which will take class into the future.

Aerial Drones Take Flight in Maritime

Flights of Fancy? No longer a pipe dream, aerial drones find a home in maritime. Price Waterhouse Cooper estimates the global commercial drone market at $127 billion. Shipyards, offshore wind-farm developers, cruise lines, blue water cargo agencies, maritime marketing departments, first responders, admiralty lawyers, shore-to-ship package couriers, insurers, classification societies, salvors, container ports and the military are all using or actively exploring drones to accomplish tasks heretofore impossible without greater risk or cost.

KOTUG: Flying Drones for Safer Tug Operations

(Image: KOTUG)

Netherlands based towage operator KOTUG said it is exploring new ways to use aerial drone technology in its tug operations, as part of a plan to achieve safer and more efficient working conditions. While interest in drone technology has been gaining momentum in the maritime sector, stakeholders continue to explore new applications, from aerial deliveries to surveying and inspection. KOTUG has applied for a patent for its new plan, which involves using a drone to connect the towline to an assisted vessel.

KRS Class Approval for Drone Inspection of Confined Spaces

Drone operator during flight inspection (Photo: RIMS)

RIMS (Robotics In Maintenance Strategies) have secured a further class approval from Korean Register of Shipping (KRS) for the use of Remote Inspection Techniques (drones) during surveys of enclosed spaces. The KRS certification for the use of Remote Inspection Techniques (drones) during surveys of enclosed spaces, adds to the now highly impressive portfolio of class approvals RIMS have achieved in such a short period of time. This further certification means that even more shipowners and managers can now reap benefits which this new technology offers during class surveys.

Drone Technology Aids Antarctic Ship Operations

Australian UAV Director James Rennie prepares the drone on the aft deck of the Aurora Australis (Courtesy Australian UAV)

A quadcopter drone has helped navigate the Aurora Australis through the sea ice on its annual resupply voyage to Casey station. Flown off the aft deck of the ship, the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) provided the crew with real-time imagery of the sea ice conditions ahead of the ship, optimising navigation decisions. Australian Antarctic Division Future Concepts Manager, Matt Filipowski, said the drone was a valuable addition to the current suite of sea ice navigation tools, which include satellite imagery and radar.

Aerial Drones a Threat to Shipping?

(Image: Martek Marine)

Aerial drones have made major advances in endurance, range and payload capacity over recent years while prices have continually plummeted, leading to a proliferation of drones expected to reach 12 million by 2020.This trend, some believe, means aerial drones will pose an even greater threat to the safety and security of commercial shipping vessels.To help combat this emerging threat, U.K. based Martek Marine has developed a maritime drone detection and defeat system called D-FENCE.As terrorist use of drones deploying explosives is well documented…

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