Marine Link
Saturday, January 20, 2018

Lcs Contract News

US Navy Warship Undergoes Shock Trials

Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship USS Jackson (LCS 6) has completed the first of three scheduled full-ship shock trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Michael Bevan)

The U.S. The Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program continues to progress, with the U.S. Navy reporting that USS Jackson (LCS 6) has completed the first of three scheduled full ship shock trial (FSST) blasts – the first ship to do so since 2008. The shock trials are designed to demonstrate the ship’s ability to withstand the effects of nearby underwater explosions and retain required capability. Furthermore, the U.S. Navy has modified shipbuilder Austal USA’s…

Austal Awarded Additional $14 Mln in LCS Work

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and USS Omaha (LCS 12) at Austal USA (Photo: Austal)

Austal Limited has been awarded $14.656 million in modifications to a previously awarded Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract by the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the contract, Austal USA will perform planning and implementation of deferred design changes that have been identified during the construction period. The corrections and upgrades are necessary to support sail-away and follow-on post-delivery test and trials period. The cost-plus contract modifications exercise options…

Austal Awarded Navy LCS Assessment Contract

LCS 4 Christening: Photo credit Austal USA

Austal USA gains additional Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) work contract. The United States Department of Defense has announced that Austal USA has been awarded a US$19.987-million modification to a previously awarded Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract. The modification exercises options for class service efforts and special studies, analyses and reviews for the LCS program. Austal USA will assess engineering and production challenges, and evaluate the cost and schedule risks, from affordability efforts to reduce LCS acquisition and lifecycle costs. Work is expected to be completed by March 2014.

LCS Contract Modification Awarded

Lockheed Martin Corp. detail design and construction of the Flight 0 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS). ($423,381,195 including all options). of up to two LCS Flight 0 ships ($536,020,688 including all options). Arlington, Va., Mobile, Ala. Works). Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

US Navy Awards Additional LCS Work to Austal

Austal Limited has been awarded a not-to-exceed $9,937,228 modification to a previously awarded Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract to provide procurement and engineering efforts in support of scope changes on fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2016 ships. This modification will incorporate additional accommodations to increase crew size on the LCS Independence-variant ships. Under the contract Austal will provide supplies, services, labor and materials, which includes program management and subcontracting management. Work is expected to be completed by August 2019. Funding in the amount of $7,452,921 will be obligated at the time of award. Austal has delivered three Independence-variant LCS to the U.S.

Austal LCS Contracts Signify Navy's Program Commitment

USS Independence: Photo credit USMRA

The US Navy has exercised contract options with Austal USA for the construction of LCS 14 & LCS 16. Austal USA’s order backlog has grown by approximately $681.7 million dollars as a result of two additional Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract options being exercised by the United States Navy. The contract options fund construction of the LCS 14 and LCS 16, the fifth and sixth ships in the 10-ship block buy award made to an Austal-led team in December 2010. That 10-ship program is potentially worth over $3.5 billion. Austal has been contracted by the U.S.

Navy Funds Austal to Build Two More LCS in US$3.5-Billion Program

LCS Independence variant photo courtesy of US Navy

Austal inform that its USA’s order backlog has grown by approximately US$684-million dollars as a result of two additional Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract options being exercised by the United States Navy. The contract options fund construction of the LCS 18 and LCS 20, the seventh and eighth ships in the 10-ship block buy award made to an Austal-led team in December 2010 in a 10-ship program potentially worth over US$3.5-billion. Chief Executive Officer Andrew Bellamy said the company’s U.S. Navy programs provide revenue and workload for years to come.

Austal Wins USN LCS Support Contract

Courtesy Austal

The U.S. Navy has awarded a contract to Austal Limited USA to provide engineering and management services support of the Post Shakedown Availability for Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10). The US$12 million cost-plus-award-fee order adds to Austal USA’s growing support business, which provides critical support to both the LCS and Expeditionary Fast Transport (EPF) fleets. Austal USA will provide design, planning, and material support services for Gabrielle Giffords (LCS10)…

Navy Awards LCS Contracts to General Dynamics and Lockheed

The Navy has awarded General Dynamics Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. the final design contracts that could lead to orders for the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). General Dynamics’ Bath Iron Work’s contract is worth $79M, and Lockheed’s is valued at $47M. The LCS is an entirely new breed of U.S. Navy warship. flexibility to ensure maritime dominance and access for the joint force. operate with focused-mission packages that deploy manned and unmanned vehicles to execute missions as assigned by Combatant Commanders. The Manitowoc Company, Inc.

Austal Bags Further $ 198 mln USN Contract

Image Austal

Austal USA has been awarded a contract for $51,684,797 to its 10-ship $3.5 billion Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract for the U.S. Navy. This contract modification is expected to increase to $198,385,545 over three years if options are exercised. This work includes design services for upgrades to the LCS and preliminary design for the U.S. Navy’s future Frigate. facility in Mobile, Ala. “This work lays a solid foundation for our growing support business and will continue to grow as these ships deliver and enter the fleet,” said Perciavalle.

LCS Manchester Completes Acceptance Trials

(Photo: Austal)

The seventh Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) built by Austal, Manchester (LCS 14), has completed acceptance trials December 15 in the Gulf of Mexico, marking the final significant milestone prior to the warship’s delivery in early 2018. This milestone achievement involved the execution of intense comprehensive tests by the Austal-led industry team while underway, which demonstrated to the Navy the successful operation of the ship’s major systems and equipment. LCS 14 will be the second Independence-variant LCS Austal delivers to the Navy in less than six months.

Navy Terminates Lockheed Martin LCS Contract

The U.S. Navy Thursday said it was canceling a widely criticized Lockheed Martin Corp. contract to build a next-generation combat ship after negotiations to control cost overruns failed. Lockheed Martin Corporation expressed disappointment over the U.S. Navy's decision to terminate its contract for construction of the second of two new Littoral Combat Ships (LCS.) The Navy announced the action at the expiration of a 90-day stop work order imposed on the second ship in January to allow the service time to review costs associated with construction of the first LCS. On March 15, Navy Secretary Donald Winter announced that the stop work order would be lifted only if Lockheed Martin agreed to accept a fixed price incentive contract for its second ship.

Editor’s Note

The future of the U.S. Navy is pictured on this month’s cover, the three designs that will battle to become the reality known as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) — a family of up to 60 (relatively) small, fast, flexible vessels designed to serve a major role in the “plug and play” military operations of the future. At press time, the American Shipbuilding Association (ASA) was lamenting the fact that the Senate had effectively cut two ships from the President’s 2004 Budget Request — the zeroing of two T-AKE Combat Force Logistics Ships — and was lobbying hard for their reinstatement. The action does appear particularly capricious at this time, considering the tremendous stress already placed upon a short-handed naval force and the exhibition of its dominance in recent overseas matters.

Report: Lockheed Could Lose LCS Contract

Adm. Michael Mullen, the Navy's Chief of Naval Operations, said Thursday that Lockheed Martin Corp. could lose part of its Littoral Combat Ship contract, depending on the results of a pending review, as reported in Business Week. Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin is on contract to build two ships, dubbed LCS 1 and LCS 3. The first ship is under construction and considerably over budget, which recently prompted the Navy to halt work on LCS 3. The Navy is on course to decide in the next few weeks whether to move to termination or to continue the program for LCS 3 according to reports. The Navy plans to build 55 of the new ships, which are designed to hunt mines, submarines and small enemy boats in coastal waters.

U.S. Navy Funds Two More Austal-Built LCS

Austal USA’s order backlog has grown by $691 million dollars as a result of two additional Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) contract options being exercised by the United States Navy. The contract options fund construction of the Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) and Omaha (LCS 12), the third and fourth ships in the 10 ship block buy award made to an Austal-led team in December 2010. That 10 ship program is potentially worth over $3.5 billion. Reflecting its growing stature in naval shipbuilding, Austal USA now holds confirmed contracts for 14 U.S. Navy ships while Austal’s Australian shipyard expects to build eight patrol boats for the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service. The U.S.

Navy Announces Flight 0 LCS Contract Awards

Lockheed Martin Corporation – Maritime Systems & Sensors, Moorestown, N.J. ($46,501,821) and General Dynamics - Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine ($78,798,188) are each being awarded contract options for final system design with options for detail design and construction of up to two Flight 0 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). "Today’s Littoral Combat Ship decision represents an important milestone for the warfighter and the acquisition team," said John Young, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition. "The acquisition team is successfully changing how we buy ships – completing the source selection on schedule and developing affordable designs that can adapt to changing technology.

First LCS Contract Awarded

Lockheed Martin Corporation - Maritime Systems & Sensors, Moorestown, N.J. ($46,501,821) and General Dynamics - Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine ($78,798,188) are each being awarded contract options for final system design with options for detail design and construction of up to two Flight 0 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS). "Today's Littoral Combat Ship decision represents an important milestone for the warfighter and the acquisition team," said John Young, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition. Operational experience and analyses indicate that potential adversaries will employ asymmetric capabilities to deny U.S. and allied forces access in critical coastal regions to include strategic chokepoints and vital economic sea lanes.

Austal Opens New Shipbuilding Facility

Photo courtesy Austal

Austal has officially opened its new Modular Manufacturing Facility (MMF), equipping its U.S. shipyard with the ability to build up to three 328-ft-plus vessels each year. Phase One of the new $88m facility boasts 35,000m2 of manufacturing space under one roof, including a 7900m2 warehouse, as well as paved parking for more than 2000 vehicles. An official ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrating the completion of Phase One was held at Austal’s Mobile, Ala. shipyard. The event was attended by more than 300 dignitaries, including Alabama Governor Bob Riley, U.S.

U.S. Navy Releases Pricing for LCS3 & 4

As a result of the Navy's change in acquisition strategy for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program, the Navy can now release the pricing for LCS 3 and LCS 4 awarded contracts. The total value of the LCS 3 contract, awarded to Lockheed Martin Corporation on March 23, was $470,854,144 which includes ship construction, non-recurring construction and additional engineering effort, configuration management services, additional crew and shore support, special studies and post delivery support. The total value of the LCS 4 contract, awarded to General Dynamics - Bath Iron Works on May 1, was $433,686,769 which includes ship construction…

Navy Awards Fiscal 2014 LCS Contracts

LCS photo credit USN

Contract modifications have been issued to Lockheed Martin Corporation and Austal USA under their respective Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) block buy contracts to add funding for construction of two fiscal year 2014 Littoral Combat Ships each, informs the Program Executive Office, Littoral Combat Ships. These are the seventh and eighth ships fully funded for each contractor under its previously-awarded, fixed-price incentive "block buy" contract for the design and construction of up to ten LCS Flight 0+ ships.

Austal Bags Further $14 mln USN's LCS Contract

LCS at Austal USA  Photo Austal

Austal USA was awarded a $14 million Littoral Combat Ship contract modification by the U.S. Navy to conduct special studies and analyses, the Navy announced this week. This is the second $14 million LCS modification contract for Austal USA this month. This award is an option exercised by the Navy to modify the original LCS 10-ship block-buy contract to allow for continued review of the program. “Our workforce is strong, the production line is hot, and our LCS program has a great deal of momentum right now,” said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle.

Navy Terminates Littoral Combat Ship 3

Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV), the Honorable Donald C. Winter discusses the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) acquisition program during a press conference in the Pentagon. The new program plan will improve management oversight, implement more strict cost controls, incorporate selective contract restructuring and ensure vital warfighting capability is provided to the fleet in a timely manner. U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist Shawn P. The Navy issued a stop-work order on construction on LCS 3 in January following a series of cost overruns on LCS 1 and projection of cost increases on LCS 3, which are being built by Lockheed Martin under a cost-plus contract.

U.S. Navy Issues Modification To Lockheed Martin Contract

Photo credit EagleHerald

The U.S. Navy has issued a Lockheed Martin-led industry team a contract modification for one fully funded 2015 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) valued at $362 million, along with $79 million in advanced procurement funding for a second ship. The balance of the second ship will be funded by Dec. 31, 2015. The advanced procurement dollars approved by Congress provides the funding required to maintain the cost and schedule of the final block buy option. The award also includes a priced option for one additional fiscal year 2016 ship.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News