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Sunday, January 21, 2018

Nautical Charts News

Death Knell for NOAA Traditional Paper Nautical Charts

Chartwork old-style: Photo courtesy of NOAA

NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey has announced major changes ahead for mariners and others who use nautical charts. Starting April 13, 2014, the federal government will no longer print traditional lithographic (paper) nautical charts . NOAA will continue to provide other forms of nautical charts, including Print-on-Demand paper charts as well as electronic and digital formats. Since 1862, those lithographic nautical charts -- available in marine shops and other stores -- have been printed by the U.S. government and sold to the public by commercial vendors.

NOAA: End of Traditional Paper Nautical Charts

Most mariners now use Print-on-Demand nautical charts that are up-to-date to the moment of printing. (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey, which creates and maintains the nation’s suite of over a thousand nautical charts of U.S. coastal waters, announced major changes ahead for mariners and others who use nautical charts. Starting April 13, the federal government will no longer print traditional lithographic (paper) nautical charts, but will continue to provide other forms of nautical charts, including print on demand charts and versions for electronic charting systems. “Like most other mariners…

NOAA Certifies More Printing Agents

The availability of paper "print-on-demand" nautical charts continues to expand, as NOAA's Office of Coast Survey has added three more printing companies to its roster of certified agents for paper charts. "The most recent printers to join the NOAA paper chart program represent the enduring connections between maritime tradition and progress," said Capt. Shep Smith, chief of Coast Survey's Marine Chart Division. "Companies with histories going back decades, and even centuries, support a firm foundation for the continuing production and delivery of U.S. Iver C. Weilbach & Co.

NOAA Certifies 11Printers for Paper Charts

Credit: NOAA

Mariners and the boating public have a wider choice of options and special services when they purchase NOAA paper nautical charts, thanks to NOAA's expanded "print-on-demand" chart production and distribution system. Coast Survey has certified eleven chart printing agents who have the flexibility to offer different color palettes, various papers, a cleaner margin, and a range of services. Under the program, NOAA's paper nautical charts are printed when the customer orders them - or "on demand." NOAA creates and maintains the charts…

Not Safe to Anchor After All

Bayou Goula Area: Image credit NOAA

NOAA chart reveals underwater hazard for proposed anchorage area near Bayou Goula Crossing channel of Mississippi River. Cartographers from NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey recently flagged a potentially dangerous situation during their review of a proposed federal rule establishing new anchorage areas on the Mississippi River. The proposed anchorage areas were based on non-NOAA charts that did not depict the underwater pipelines. The pipelines, which carry benzene, posed a potential danger if ships dropped anchor on top of them. The pipeline areas are depicted on the NOAA nautical chart.

NOAA Raster Charts Available Online

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is making available online its Raster Nautical Charts (RNC). These charts are geo-referenced, full-color images of NOAA’s paper nautical charts, published by NOAA in the .BSB format. NOAA updates the RNC for Notices to Mariners on a weekly basis. They are an official product of NOAA and meet the S-61 Standard – Raster Navigational Charts – of the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). Source: HK Law

Nautical Chart Updating – White Paper by OceanGrafix

OceanGrafix, the exclusive provider of NOAA print-on-demand (POD) nautical charts for U.S. waters, announces the availability of “The Creation of Accurate, Precise Charts: Understanding U.S. Nautical Chart Updates and Their Distribution.” This new white paper highlights why nautical charts are so important to mariners—including recreational boaters—and explains how a mariner can easily access chart updates. “Recreational boaters, unlike commercial mariners, are not required to carry nautical charts. But as more demands are put on our waterways, busy coasts mean more risk for accidents,” says Capt. John Lowell, director of NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey.

OceanGrafix Begins Test Phase

OceanGrafix begun the beta test phase for remote printing locations of the Charts-on-Demand nautical charts. Using digital print technology, OceanGrafix has begun the testing in Louisiana at two of their chart agent’s locations, McCurnin Nautical and Baker Lyman, with expectations to soon have many remote printing sites throughout the United States. By utilizing the remote printing capability, OceanGrafix is able to further their mission of providing the maritime industry with the most current information in the least amount of time. OceanGrafix, in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), produces fully corrected and up-to-date nautical charts of all US waterways.

Online Chart Viewer from NOAA

The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, NOAA, surveys and charts U.S. waters, producing over 1,000 traditional nautical charts 3.4m sq. nautical miles. Carriage of NOAA charts is mandatory on the commercial ships that carry our commerce. They are used on every Navy and Coast Guard ship, fishing and passenger vessels. On July 4, NOAA introduced a new public service called the Online Chart Viewer. The Viewer lets mariners display any nautical chart in the national suite using only an internet browser. Each chart is updated weekly for notice to Mariner corrections by NOAA’s experienced nautical cartographers. The Viewer’s fast, image displaying software permits rapid chart display, panning and zooming. The On-line Viewer can be used for voyage planning and research.

NOAA's Paper Charts are here to Stay

Rear Adm. Gerd Glang certifies a new print-on-demand chart agent after inspecting the company's sample chart. (Photo: NOAA)

It won't be long before mariners and the boating public will have a wider choice of options and special services when they purchase NOAA paper nautical charts, thanks to NOAA's expanded "print-on-demand" chart production and distribution system, Coast Survey officials announced today. This week, Coast Survey certified new print-on-demand chart printing agents, and gave them the flexibility to offer different color palettes, various papers, a cleaner margin, and a range of services.

NOAA and U.S. Power Squadrons Renew Program

This week, NOAA and the U.S. Power Squadrons, a non-profit organization dedicated to safe boating, will renew a 50-year commitment to a cooperative charting program that helps to update the nation's thousands of navigational charts. Under the voluntary program, formalized by a Memorandum of Agreement, members of the U.S. Power Squadrons scan water and land areas, looking for changing conditions that may not be reflected on NOAA nautical charts. Power Squadrons members submit their reports online, and NOAA cartographers review and incorporate changes to their navigation products. "The partnership between Coast Survey and the Power Squadrons is a long and successful one, speaking to our shared vision of safety on U.S.

No Fear, NOAA Paper Charts Still Near

Chart lithography c. 1908: Photo courtesy of NOAA

The announcement that the federal government will stop bulk lithographic printing of nautical charts brought some understandable angst, however NOAA say they may be changing the chart production process but they will NOT stop the production of paper charts. The Agency explain they are working with private companies to make them better: printed in brighter colors and available for fast delivery to the door. Most importantly, they are up-to-date to the moment ordered. These improved paper charts are NOAA-certified print-on-demand (POD) nautical charts created by NOAA Coast Survey cartographers.

NOAA Unveils Collection of Civil War Maps and Nautical Charts

In honor of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in 2011, NOAA has assembled a special historical collection of maps, charts, and documents prepared by the U.S. Coast Survey during the war years. The collection, “Charting a More Perfect Union,” contains over nearly 400 documents, available free from NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey website. “People are planning now for their visits to Civil War sites next year, and we want to give them an opportunity to visualize the terrain, ports, and coasts as they were from 1861 to 1865,” said Meredith Westington, NOAA’s chief geographer. Coast Survey’s collection includes 394 Civil War-era maps, including nautical charts used for naval campaigns, and maps of troop movements and battlefields.

Displaced features on nautical chart

The National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) issued a Hydrolant stating that, due to a production problem that caused displaced features, NIMA has determined that digital nautical chart CD15 (Gulf of Mexico/Straits of Florida) is not to be used for navigation or situational awareness. A NIMA review is in process to address this situation. (Source: HK Law)

NOAA to Boost Arctic Nautical Charting

NOAA officers aboard one of the smaller survey vessels contemplate the vastness of the Chukchi Sea during the NOAA Ship Fairweather's reconnaissance survey in 2013. (Credit: NOAA)

NOAA plans increased 2015 Arctic nautical charting operations, coordinating with U.S. As commercial shipping traffic increases in the Arctic, NOAA informs it is taking steps to update nautical charts in the region. NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey will use data collected by two of its own ships, Rainier and Fairweather, as well as the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy and a private sector hydrographic contractor to cover nearly 12,000 nautical miles in the Arctic for use in updating its navigational charts.

Nautical Chart Updated for Charleston Harbor

The red lines (not included on the actual chart 11525) show the limits of the old chart.

The new nautical chart 11525 extends eastward, to cover an additional pilot boarding area for vessels headed to the Charleston Harbor. Ships entering the Port of Charleston will have a new and improved nautical chart that covers a larger area to ensure safer navigational approaches into the harbor. Available on the 4th of July, new chart 11525 (Charleston Harbor Entrance and Approach) replaces the old chart 11523 (Charleston Harbor Entrance). It expands chart coverage further east, covering an additional 345 square nautical miles that wasn’t on the old chart.

Waterproof Charts Available from OceanGrafix

Nearly all nautical charts in stock are now available from OceanGrafix in new 100% waterproof format. Printed on a high-grade synthetic material, OceanGrafix’ s new waterproof charts are completely impervious to water. “Mariners face a variety of conditions onboard that can make it challenging to keep paper charts dry,” says OceanGrafix President Ron Walz. “While our standard, water-resistant charts meet the needs of many of our clients, some environments do call for a truly waterproof chart,” adds Walz. “This new format gives our mariners another option. St. Paul, Minnesota–based OceanGrafix is the first and only company to offer NOAA print-on-demand nautical charts for recreational and commercial boaters.

Coast Survey to Resove Magenta Line Issues

The Office of Coast Survey has announced that future editions of nautical charts of the Intracoastal Waterway will be updated to include an improved "magenta line" that has historically aided navigation down the East Coast and around the Gulf Coast. Additionally, Coast Survey will change the magenta line's function, from the perceived "recommended route" established more than a hundred years ago, to an advisory directional guide that helps prevent boaters from going astray in the maze of channels that comprise the route.

US Chart No. 1 Goes Electronic

Chart No.1 Globe: Image credit NOAA

U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Chart No.1 has described the symbols used on paper nautical charts for 65 years. Mariners have had a standard guide for understanding the symbols, abbreviations and terms used on paper nautical charts since 1948. In a major step forward, a new edition of that guide also describes the symbols specified by the International Hydrographic Organization for the display of electronic navigational charts (ENC) on Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS). Several maritime nations produce their own versions of Chart 1. The U.S. Chart No.

Chart Agent, ECS Provider, Move Office

The New Office: Photo credit Chartworld

ChartWorld & SevenCs have moved offices to the heart of Hamburg opposite the BSH (German Hydrographic Office). “As the companies are growing, we now have enough space to accommodate the team now and in the future. The new office and its location are a big step forward for us and will help us to ensure high quality products and services to our customers.” Jochen Rudolph, Managing Director, comments. Established in 2000, ChartWorld is a leading chart agent specializing in the resale of digital maritime data and data services for professional maritime use.

New Navigational Product Trio from NOAA

Mobile App in Beta: Image courtesy of NOAA

NOAA highlight new US Chart 1, new chart of California waters with IMO TSS shown, and a beta mobile chart app for boaters. New U.S. For the 65 years since the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey issued the first edition of U.S. Chart No.1 in 1948, mariners have had a standard guide for understanding the symbols, abbreviations and terms used on paper nautical charts. In a major step forward, a new edition of that guide also describes the symbols specified by the International Hydrographic…

NOAA Updates Cobscook Bay Area Chart

Northern Maine vessels will be able to navigate more safely around the dangerous Cobscook Bay thanks to an updated version of the area's nautical chart issued by NOAA. The latest chart includes a new detailed illustration-called a "chart inset"-of the waters around Falls Island, providing safer passage for mariners who transit those waters. While NOAA cartographers had updated Chart 13394 (Grand Manan Channel) over the past several years, using depth measurements and obstruction locations acquired during a major hydrographic survey in 2010, a new inset was needed specifically for Falls Island. "Larger, more detailed scale coverage helps mitigate the dangers to navigation in these areas," explained Cmdr. Shep Smith, chief of NOAA Office of Coast Survey's  Marine Chart Division.

NOAA Begins Production With Esri

GIS Creates Integrated Data Workflow for More Efficient Chart Production. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has implemented a new nautical charting system based on Esri GIS technology to produce more navigational products than ever before without increasing its budget or personnel needs. The new system, NCS II, is based on Esri Nautical Solution, and it allows NOAA to centralize the management of hydrographic data for US coastal waters. Since accepting Esri Nautical Solution as part of its production system in 2009…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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