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Monday, January 22, 2018

Navy Sub News

Chilean Navy Sub on Sea Trials

The Submarine “Carrera”, second of the Scorpene class, built by the French-Spanish consortium for the Chilean Navy, carried out on 11th. November its first sea trials, testing the correct performance of the surface navigation equipment. This submarine has been assembled in Cartagena shipyard and was floated on 24 November 2004. The first unit of this class was delivered to the Chilean Navy last September, and this unit expects to be delivered in early 2006.

Trials Carried Out on New Chilean Navy Sub

Navantia’s Cartagena shipyard has carried out, on 16th. February, for the first time a real exit trial from the hatch of the “Carrera” submarine, second unit that is being built for the Chilean Navy. This trial verifies the correct installation of the rescue equipment (EQ-4) as part of the usual trials prior to the delivery of the submarine. These trials, done in collaboration with the Spanish Navy Diving Unit, took place at 14 m depth and with the highest security controls, avoiding the risk of the free exit of a person from the submarine hatch.

Philippine Senators Question Navy's $310 Million Frigate Deal

A group of Philippine opposition senators has sought a public inquiry into the navy’s 15.7 billion peso ($310 million) acquisition of a frigate from a South Korean firm, after media said the president’s closest aide had meddled in the deal. President Rodrigo Duterte is furious at media reports that his longtime special assistant, Christopher “Bong” Go, had intervened to help a South Korean sub-contractor win the right to install a combat management system on the two missile-capable vessels, which are due for delivery in 2020. Go has denied any wrongdoing. The frigate issue cost former navy chief Vice Admiral Ronald Joseph Mercado his job last month.

Boeing UUV Indicates Compatibility, Utility with Navy Subs

Boeing has completed a second round of at-sea tests of its Long-term Mine Reconnaissance System (LMRS), a 20-foot unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) designed to be launched, torpedo-style, from Los Angeles- and Virginia-class submarines to survey underwater objects for up to 60 hours. Originally planned for use in detecting tethered and bottom mines, the vehicle is designed to gather data and, upon completion, to home and dock to the submarine's 60-foot robotic arm for recovery back through the torpedo launch tube, enabling operators to retrieve data collected and prepare the vehicle for another launch. The vehicle's intelligence gathering capabilities have been sequentially tested and validated.

Navy Sub and Merchant Vessel Collide

The Navy issued a report in response to the collision involving a Navy submarine and merchant vessel. According to the Navy's report, no U.S. sailors or merchant crew were injured when a U.S. Navy submarine and a commercial cargo vessel collided in the Strait of Hormuz on Monday evening January 8, 2007. The collision between USS Newport News (SSN 750) and the Japanese-flagged motor vessel Mogamigawa occurred at approximately 10:15 in the evening (local time) in the strait of Hormuz while the submarine was transiting submerged. Overall damage to the USS Newport News is being evaluated. The propulsion plant was unaffected by this collision. The incident is currently under investigation.

Maiden Anti-Ship Missile Launch by Kalvari

Kalvari sent to the dock for setting afloat to Naval Dockyard (Mumbai). File Photo: Indian Navy

The Indian Navy has successfully conducted the maiden firing of an Anti-Ship missile from the first of the indigenously built Kalvari class submarines, during a test firing in the Arabian Sea. The missile successfully hit a surface target at extended ranges during the trial firing. This missile launch is a significant milestone, not only for the Kalvari, which is the first in a series of Scorpene class submarines being built in India, but also in enhancing the Indian Navy’s sub-surface warfare capability.

OSI to Upgrade Canadian Navy Software

HMCS Toronto in the Arabian Gulf. Credit: Colin Kelley

OSI Maritime Systems announced that it has signed a contract to provide in-service-support for its ECPINS-W Sub software - ECPINS is the only ECDIS independently certified against NATO WECDIS STANAG 4564. The software is in service across the Royal Canadian Navy surface and subsurface fleet. Under the terms of this contract, OSI will provide an upgrade to its most advanced ECPINS-W Sub software and provide in-service support for this software for six years, with options to extend for up to 20 years.

Navy Dismisses Sub Purchase Pressure

Navy officials held firm to a decision to buy only one submarine annually for the next several years, despite a strong reaction from lawmakers concerned that the limited procurement would exacerbate problems in the struggling shipbuilding industry. During their annual budget presentation to the House Armed Services Committee, Navy leaders argued increasing submarine purchases in the short term would throw the service's carefully balanced shipbuilding plan off kilter, forcing substantial cuts elsewhere. At more than $2 billion each, submarines are one of the priciest items on the Navy procurement menu. Current plans call for the service to increase buys to two subs a year in 2012 -- but not before then.

Submarine USS Miami Fire – Vacuum Cleaner the Source

'USS Miami' Photo credit USN

The fire, which burned for nearly 10 hours, caused damage that will take at least $400 million to fix, said Deb White, spokeswoman for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine. The 22-year-old sub was about two months into a scheduled 18-month engineering overhaul at the shipyard. “Specific details as to the cause and subsequent damage assessment are still being evaluated as part of on-going investigations and will be released at a later date,” White said in a statement. Navy officials said the fire did not endanger the sub’s nuclear reactor.

Jensen Design Selected for NAVSEA Newbuild

Photo: Jensen Martime Consultants

Jensen Maritime Consultants, a Crowley company, said one of its workboat designs will be used by a Pacific Northwest boat builder to fulfill a construction project for the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA). In support of the project, Jensen will supply a functional and regulatory design package for the 41-foot vessel, which will provide ship- and sub-assist services, as well as other port operational services at U.S. Navy port locations around the world. Jensen’s Bryan Nichols…

Analox wins US and UK Naval Contracts

Analox has been awarded a contract by the US Defense department for the supply of a 40 additional Sub MkIIP Submarine Escape Monitors. This adds to the fleet’s current pool of 209 operational Sub MkIIP analysers. In addition to supplying the fleet, Analox is contracted to the annual in service support of the analysers. Also, The UK Ministry of Defence has awarded Analox, a North Yorkshire/ UK SME, the contract for Submarine Escape Analysers for the UK Royal Navy Submarine Fleet. The Royal Navy has taken the decision to upgrade to the Analox Sub MkIIP, which is the only real time analyser that meets NATO standards and the requirements of the submarine service.

OSI to Integrate Software for UK Royal Navy

U.K. Royal Navy photo

OSI Maritime Systems (OSI) announced the signing of a contract to integrate its flagship software, ECPINS-W Sub, into the U.K. Royal Navy’s T45 Destroyer Integrated Bridge System (IBS). Under the terms of this contract, OSI will provide software engineering activity to fully integrate ECPINS into the existing IBS system architecture. OSI supplies the Royal Navy with its advanced NATO WECDIS STANAG 4564 certified ECPINS-W Sub software across all operational ships, submarines, shore headquarters, and training establishments.

Navy: Tanker Pulled up Sub

According to reports, the Navy calls attributed the venturi effect. Navy officials have released preliminary findings into Monday's collision between a Norfolk-based submarine and a Japanese oil tanker in the Persian Gulf. The Navy says the sub Newport News was submerged and heading into the Arabian Sea when the mammoth oil tanker passed overhead at a high speed, creating a sucking effect that made the sub rise and hit the ship. The Navy says no one was injured aboard either ship, and damage to both vessels is relatively minor. The Newport News left Norfolk along with the aircraft carrier Eisenhower strike group in October for a six-month deployment to the Middle East.

Congress Eyes Boost in Sub Production

The interest in increasing submarine production hasn't subsided since Democrats took control of Congress last month. In fact, several efforts are under way to increase the Navy's shipbuilding budget in 2008 with funding for five additional ships beyond what the Navy had originally requested, including a second fast-attack submarine. U.S Rep. Joe Courtney, D-2nd District, has picked up the continued the debate started by his predecessor, former Congressman Rob Simmons. Last year, the Republican-controlled Congress approved the authorization for two subs a year, but failed to approve the money to make that happen. The president's proposed 2008 Defense spending plan includes funding for just one sub.

Navy Plans Call for 51 New Ships by 2011

A draft of the Navy's five-year construction program calls for the continued building of one Virginia-class submarine a year, despite pressure from Connecticut's congressional delegation to boost production to at least two subs annually. The draft report calls for an overall $69 billion construction budget for the Navy through fiscal year 2011, including nearly $16 billion for five new subs, which are being jointly built by the Groton-based Electric Boat shipyard and the Northrop Grumman Newport News yard in Virginia. In addition, the draft report reportedly calls for a total of 51 new ships during the five-year timeframe, including a new aircraft carrier, new DD(X) destroyers and littoral combat ships for close-to-shore operations and the additional Virginia-class subs.

Sub Threats Top Priority

In November, a Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force plane noticed a suspicious object in Japanese waters off Okinawa. News reports at the time said it was a Chinese submarine scouting coastal water routes. The observation sparked a small international incident and illustrated the rising threat of one of the most dangerous weapon platforms available, defense analysts say. The amazing firepower of submarines, according to a congressional report, can take out ships and, if armed with cruise or nuclear missiles, even cities. They also can be used to spy, eavesdrop, transport Special Forces troops or float silently, awaiting the call to launch an offensive. They can cut off an army’s supplies by impeding military sea- lifts and can disrupt commercial trade to entire nations.

NEXT GENERATION Marine Power & Propulsion Conference

The NEXT GENERATION Marine Power & Propulsion Conference is being held at the Grand Harbour, Southampton on April 18 and 19, 2018. All sectors are invited to participate in this unique event that focuses on viable solutions for sub IMO / sub 24 meter vessels. As most new power and propulsion technology is proving to be scalable this knowledge is becoming increasingly relevant to vessels of all sizes. Conference organizer, John Haynes, said, “It is clear that emerging technologies including the use of electric drives linked to lithium-ion batteries…

Ex-US Navy Officers Face Negligent Homicide Charges over Ship Collisions

Significant visible damage to USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC while underway east of the Straits of Malacca and Singapore on Aug. 21. (U.S. Navy photo by Madailein Abbott)

The commanding officers of two U.S. Navy destroyers involved in deadly collisions last year in the Pacific Ocean face courts-martial and military criminal charges including negligent homicide, the U.S. Navy said in a statement on Tuesday. Filing charges against the officers marks the Navy’s latest effort to address the problems that led to collisions involving its warships in Asia, in which 17 sailors were killed. The Navy has already dismissed several senior officers, including the commander of the Seventh Fleet, as a result of the collisions.

US Navy to Name Attack Submarine USS Arkansas

Image: U.S. Navy graphic by Mass Communication Specialist

A Virginia-class attack submarine will be called the USS Arkansas, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced that SSN 800, a Virginia-class attack submarine, will bear the name USS Arkansas. “As we sail deeper into the 21st century it is time for another USS Arkansas; time to keep that storied name alive in our Navy,” said Mabus. Virginia-class subs have enhanced stealth and surveillance capabilities. They can attack targets ashore with Tomahawk cruise missiles and engage in anti-submarine and anti-ship warfare, mine delivery and minefield mapping.

Navies to Address Maritime Skill Decline

Photo courtesy of JFD

However reintegration of capabilities is presenting new challenges in the design, manufacture and integration of sub-sea and surface systems for maritime Special Forces. James Fisher Defencehas stated that navies around the world are now seriously addressing the need to re-develop their skills in the use of maritime warfare, specifically in relation to maritime Special Forces and strategies for operations and intelligence gathering. This is leading to new challenges in how sub-sea and surface systems are designed, manufactured and integrated.

This Day in U.S. Naval History – January 27

1942 - USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine in action, Japanese I-173. 1945 - Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after women member of U.S. Navy. 1967 - Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot LCDR Roger B. Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 - Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History – Jan. 27

1942 - USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine in action, Japanese I-173. 1945 - Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after women member of U.S. Navy. 1967 - Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot LCDR Roger B. Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 - Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War (Source: Navy News Service)  

GE Ships LM2500 Marine Gas Turbine for US Navy

GE LM2500 GT hanging angle shot (Photo: GE Marine)

GE's Marine Solutions division said it has shipped a LM2500 marine gas turbine propulsion module that will help power the U.S. Navy's 75th DDG Arleigh Burke-class destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). Shipbuilder Huntington Ingalls Industries' Ingalls Shipbuilding division will construct this new destroyer with U.S. Navy Flight III upgrades incorporated. Each DDG destroyer features four GE LM2500 marine gas turbines in a combined gas turbine and gas turbine (COGAG) configuration. "Since 1991 - for just the U.S.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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