Marine Link
Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Port Security Training for Mauritanian Officials

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

Officials responsible for port security in Mauritania are undergoing a week-long International Maritime Organization (IMO)  training course in the country’s capital of Nouakchott (7-11 August). The course will equip designated authority officials, port security officials and managers with the skills to carry out effective self-assessments and audits of port facilities, in line with IMO’s International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and guidance on voluntary self-assessment.

Mozambique Gets Fresh Training on Port Security

Image:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

A five-day workshop on maritime security and The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code concluded today in Maputo, Mozambique (24 -28 July). The course provided port facility security officers with the necessary knowledge to perform their duties in accordance with the requirements of key IMO maritime security measures*. As a results, participants improved their knowledge and skills of those requirements with a view to train others with similar responsibilities.

EC Adopts Proposal to Implement IMO Agreement on Security

Security (ISPS) Code. to be issued with a continuous synopsis record (CSR). security plans, taking into account the risk assessment. in some respects. the IMO agreement. and to avoid differences of interpretation between EU Member States. made compulsory. company and ship security officers. 2004. with their consideration of the proposal. role.

AON Launches Port Facility Security Toolkit

AON, a global leader in risk management and insurance brokerage, has launched the Port Facility Security Toolkit (PFST) internationally. The Toolkit, which was developed primarily for port authorities around the world will comply with the International Ship and Facility Security Code (ISPS code) regulations. Working together with the Port of Rotterdam, AON’s s system will translate the ISPS code into an efficient, user-friendly, web-enabled software tool enabling port facilities to carry out a risk assessment and generate an Action Plan and a detailed Port Facility Security Plan. KPMG Qubus, specialists in automated risk assessment, developed the software in WebQubus.

EP Resolution on Ship and Port Facility Security

The European Parliament issued a Press Release that states, in pertinent part, that the Parliament adopted a resolution to improve ship and port facility security. Member States are to designate a focal point for maritime security. Member States should apply the special measures to enhance the SOLAS Convention and should apply these measures to domestic shipping by 1 July 2005. In debate, MEPs were concerned about financial consequences for the maritime sector. Source: HK Law

ISPS/MTSA Update

The U.S. Coast Guard has collected the following nationwide compliance data on both the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS) and Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA). The vessel arrivals and inspections reflect activity for Monday, July 5. The denials of entry and detentions in port are totals for July 1-5. The foreign vessels detained or denied entry failed to comply with the requirements of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. U.S. U.S. The numbers of vessels and facilities restricted or closed is current as of 9 p.m. July 5. Restrictions placed on U.S. vessels and facilities range in severity based on the nature of the ship or facility and of non-compliance.

GMATS Offers Approved Security Courses

Combined Vessel, Company, and Facility Security Officer Course offered by GMATS in multiple locations. This course has been approved by the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Maritime Administration through the quality standard system of Det Norske Veritas (DNV). It meets the STCW Convention training requirements for Vessel Security Officer. This course ensures that participants learn effective security techniques and training procedures for handling maritime issues both domestic and abroad.

The ICCL Co-Hosts Security Implementation Workshop

The International Council of Cruise Lines (ICCL) along with the American Association of Port Authorities and the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Association brought together the ports of the Caribbean June 25-27, 2003, in Jamaica, to discuss the implementation of new international security requirements. The workshop provided an in-depth overview of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code, as required by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) by July 2004. The ISPS Code provides a standard global security framework that will enable ports, shipping companies and governments to operate on equal preparedness and response levels. The IMO developed the ISPS Code to implement maritime and port security regulations in response to heightened security issues since Sept.

IMO Tech Coop Program to Enhance ISPS Implementation

In the run-up to the July 1, 2004 international deadline for implementation of the maritime security measures adopted by IMO in December 2002, a far-reaching and multi-faceted programme of technical assistance by the Organization, aimed at helping Governments strengthen maritime and port security, is in full swing and having a significant impact, particularly in the developing world. IMO launched its global technical co-operation programme on maritime security in January 2002, 11 months before the IMO Diplomatic Conference on Maritime Security adopted amendments to the SOLAS Convention and the related International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS) in December 2002.

IMO Urges Port ISPS Compliance

The IMO issued a Circular urging port facilities to promptly implement the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. It notes that port facilities seem to be lagging behind ships in compliance efforts, which raises the prospect of compliant ships not being able to call at port facilities lacking requisite approved security plans without endangering their own security compliance status. MSC Circ. 1106 (HK Law).

IMO Program Enhances ISPS Implementation

In the run-up to the 1 July 2004 international deadline for implementation of the maritime security measures adopted by IMO in December 2002, a far-reaching and multi-faceted programme of technical assistance by the Organization, aimed at helping Governments strengthen maritime and port security, is in full swing and having a significant impact, particularly in the developing world. IMO launched its global technical co-operation programme on maritime security in January 2002, 11 months before the IMO Diplomatic Conference on Maritime Security adopted amendments to the SOLAS Convention and the related International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS) in December 2002.

ISPS Code – Two Weeks and Counting

The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code comes into effect two weeks from today – on 1 July 2004. Hindsight has shown that the ISPS Code was developed in haste and insufficient attention has been paid to its implementation by many involved in the process – flag administrations, security advisors, recognized security organizations, owners, and operators. It is now up to everyone to cooperatively work to improve maritime security while keeping commerce moving. The needs of neither maritime security nor maritime commerce should solely predominate. Growing pains should be expected as port state control (PSC) officials, ships’ crews, and facility personnel adjust to the new paradigm.

IMO Proceeds Quickly on Safety Matters

for a successful outcome to the conference is high. 9th to 13th September 2002. chapter XI. recommendatory. of the risks must be made in each particular case. in threat with changes in vulnerability for ships and port facilities. facility security assessments. essential components. life or damage to the port facility's economy or environment. assets and infrastructure in order to prioritise security measures. within a port facility that may be a likely target. accurately evaluate risk. facilities. drills will naturally play an important role. by the Administration or Contracting Government, as the case may be. the Contracting Government would set the appropriate security level. situations, respectively. appropriate security measures for the ship and for the port facility.

IMO Updates ISPS Figures

The IMO released ISPS Code implementation figures as of June 16, 2004. To date, 39 governments have provided responses indicating 21,347 ships from those nations are subject to the ISPS Code; 16,570 ship security plans have been submitted to these governments; and 6,127 International Ship Security Certificates (ISSCs) have been issued. Of the 6,117 port facilities identified by these governments, 1,970 have submitted security plans and 663 have been approved. This data indicates that at least 22% of the ships and 67% of the port facilities of these 39 countries have little hope of timely compliance since they have not even submitted security plans for review. The News Release does not identify the 39 governments providing responses. This report updates an IMO News Release of June 11.

US, Malaysia Bolster Port Security Partnership

Lt. Cmdr. Carlos Gavilanes (Far Right/Light Blue Shirt), Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Beaudoin (Brown Shirt), Lt. Alejandro Collazo (Light Blue Shirt/Hand Gesture) and Mr. Tivo Romero (Aloha Shirt). (Photo courtesy Penang Port Sdn Bhd.)

A U.S. Coast Guard International Port Security team completed a bilateral engagement with Malaysian officials in April. This engagement involved sharing best practices and visiting with the Ministry of Infrastructure Marine and Ports Division to observe the implementation of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code at three port facilities: Northport, Port Klang and two port facilities in Penang; Swettenham Cruise Terminal and North Butterworth Container Terminal.

IMO Will Adopt Comprehensive Maritime Security Measures

A high-level Diplomatic Conference begins at IMO Headquarters in London today to adopt a package of security measures for the international maritime and port industries. The measures represent the culmination of just over a year’s intense work by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee and its Intersessional Working Group since the terrorist atrocities in the United States in September 2001. The Conference will be invited to adopt amendments to the Safety of Life at Sea Convention (SOLAS). Among the most far-reaching of these is the proposed International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code which would be implemented through a new chapter of the Convention.

USCG Port Security Advisory for Libya

The U.S. Coast Guard, in light of civil unrest in Libya, issued a Port Security Advisory for Libya March 11, suggesting security measures for ships to take when calling upon Libyan ports. Civil unrest in Libya has prompted U.S. government concerns regarding whether port facility requirements of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code are still being executed and maintained. The U.S. Directly report the actions taken to the cognizant U.S. Coast Guard Captain of the Port prior to arrival at a U.S. port. "The current security situation in Libya's ports is unknown at this time,” said Coast Guard Rear Adm. Kevin Cook, director of Prevention Policy. Implementing the above recommended security measures will generally expedite vessel entry into the U.

US Helps Micronesia Boost Port Security

(U.S. Coast Guard photo by Activities Far East)

A U.S. Coast Guard International Port Security team in cooperation with officials from the Federated States of Micronesia’s Department of Transportation, Communication and Infrastructure completed three days of port facility security seminars in March. The engagement involved sharing best practices for conducting drills and exercises and to observe the implementation of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code at Kosrae Okat Commercial Dock port facility in the Port of Kosrae. “In a global economy, your security is our security,” said Lt. Cmdr. Chester K.

Legal: Declaration of Security

Like most other tasks involving two or more parties, maritime security becomes less difficult if each party understands what the others are going to be doing. The method for achieving this understanding in the marine sector, under both the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and the U.S. Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA), is by means of the Declaration of Security. Declaration of Security (DoS) is defined by the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention as "an agreement reached between a ship and either a port facility or another ship with which it interfaces, specifying the security measures each will implement". Maritime security regulations promulgated by the U.S.

Canada Invests $42m for Marine Security Projects

Lawrence Cannon, Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities, announced that 386 projects aimed at enhancing security at Canadian ports and marine facilities will receive funding under the Marine Security Contribution Program, and that Transport Canada is now accepting applications under the program’s next round of funding. This round of funding will provide up to $42 million to 101 ports and marine facilities across the country. The funds will be used for security enhancements such as surveillance equipment, dockside and perimeter security, command, control and communications equipment, and training. The five-year, $115-million program is helping Canada’s ports and marine facilities to modernize and strengthen their security systems and programs…

Maritime Security Measures Take Shape at IMO

Experts in maritime security from around the world have completed an exhausting week-long meeting in preparation for a Diplomatic Conference later this year which is expected to adopt a completely new regulatory regime designed to prevent ships and their cargoes becoming the targets of terrorist activities. The second meeting of the intersessional working group on maritime security of the IMO's Maritime Safety Committee met at IMO headquarters last week (September 9th to 13th) to continue its work in refining a raft of measures to be put before the Conference in December. The new measures are centered around a proposed International Ship and Port Facility Security Code…

PMA Implementation of ISPS Code

The Panama Maritime Authority (PMA) posted on its Internet site a revised circular discussing implementation of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. Among other things, the circular identifies the Recognized Security Organizations (RSOs) for purposes of evaluation of ship security plans and the RSOs for verification of the plans. Merchant Marine Circular No. 131 Revised (12/30/03). For more information, contact PMA at Fax: (507) 232 8268 or E-mail: MSD@amp.gob.pa (Source: HK Law)

Panama Selects Recognized Security Organization

The Panama Maritime Authority (AMP) has selected Phoenix Management Services Group Inc, represented in Panama by Phoenix Vessels services Inc, to assess on the evaluation of ship security plans. The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code, approved in December 2002 by the International Maritime Organization, is an amendment to the SOLAS/74 convention and will enter force on July 1st, 2004. The AMP recently created the new Department of Maritime Security in charge of implementing the new IMO’s requirements and proper execution of the ISPS Code, to comply with Panama’s obligations as the world’s largest merchant fleet.

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