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Monday, January 22, 2018

Ship Anchor News

Norway Exempts Idled OSV's From License Fee

Owners of ships serving the oil industry will be exempt from paying license fees for 2016 on vessels that have been mothballed, Norway's industry minister said in a statement on Tuesday. The price of crude oil has plunged 70 percent since mid-2014, leading to cutbacks in oil industry investments and lower demand for supply ships, anchor handlers and construction vessels. The fee per ship registered in Norway is about 35,000 Norwegian crowns ($4,000) per year, and the industry's overall savings are expected to amount to around 2.3 million crowns for the year, Industry Minister Monica Maeland said. Reporting by Terje Solsvik

COSCO: Ships at Tianjin Port not Impacted

China Ocean Shipping (Group) Company said its ships anchored at Tianjin port were not affected by the blasts at a warehouse in the country's northeastern city last week, though some of its facilities in the area suffered varying levels of damage. China's largest shipping conglomerate, whose listed firms include China COSCO Holdings , said in an emailed statement on Monday that a few of its employees and their family members suffered minor injuries. The official Xinhua news agency said on Sunday that the death toll from Wednesday's disaster rose to 112, while 95 people are missing.   Reporting by Brenda Goh

Ship Mishap Disables Phone Lines

Telephone lines in the Egyptian northcoast town of Port Fouad went dead this weekend after a Tunisian ship sliced cables while trying to avoid an oncoming ferry, police said. The ship's anchor cut through phone cables as the crew tried to move it out of the way of the passenger ferry at the harbor of Port Fouad, 170 km (100 miles) northeast of Cairo. - (Reuters)

Grounding in Russia’s Bourgas Bay

According to a Feb. 8 report from The Sofia Echo, a Russian flagged ship, Irtysh 1, has been forced onto the shallow waters and sand of Bourgas Bay, the Bulgarian Ministry of Transport said on its website. Strong winds and high seas tore the ship's anchor and made it drift to the beach near the village of Kraimorie. (Source: The Sofia Echo)  

CG Responds to Oil Spill off Savannah Coast

The Coast Guard is responding to an oil spill approximately nine-miles offshore of Savannah after a tank ship punctured a hole in its double-hulled fuel tank during the deployment of the ship's anchor Sept. 27. The Singapore based tank ship, Stolt Vision, reportedly sustained a rupture to the starboard fuel tank located beneath the water surface while lowering its anchor at approximately 5:50 p.m. Sept. 27. A Coast Guard helicopter crew from Air Station Savannah conducted an over flight of the area at approximately 8:00 p.m., and confirmed an oil sheen approximately two-miles long and 60-feet wide. Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Savannah, Station Tybee Island, Ga., and Air Station Savannah are responding to the incident.

Caymans Ban Cruise Ships at Port

The Cayman Islands government have banned cruise ships from anchoring at a port where their huge chains have damaged coral reefs, the AP reported. Environmental officials say some coral can be preserved despite extensive damage along the sea floor near the Spotts Dock facility, which is used as an alternative port when seas are too rough for cruise ships to call on the George Town harbor. A cruise ship anchoring for one day can destroy nearly an 1 acre (0.4 hectares) of intact reef, government officials said. Cruise ships capable of holding their position without anchoring will still be allowed to unload passengers in Spotts Bay, about 10 miles east of the capital. Source: AP

ATSB Issues Report on Pasha Bulker Grounding

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) issued the report of its investigation of the grounding of the Pasha Bulker at on June 8, 2007. The investigation found that the master did not appropriately ballast the vessel and did not weigh anchor until it dragged in severe weather. The master had incorrectly assumed that authorities ashore would instruct ships to put out to sea when conditions were bad. After the ship got underway, the master made further inappropriate decisions due to task overloading, fatigue, and anxiety. The ship’s safety management system provided the master with insufficient guidance about safety putting to sea in adverse weather.

Rolls-Royce Wins $3.1 Million Contract

Rolls-Royce has landed a $3.1 million order from Ferguson Shipbuilders in Port Glasgow for an equipment package comprised of Rauma Brattvaag deck machinery, bulk handling systems and Tenfjord steering gear and rudders. The package has been ordered for a new 246 ft. (75 m) Stirling Shipping anchor handling tug-supply vessel (AHTS), which will be an enhanced version of M/V Stirling Iona, which was delivered by Ferguson earlier this year. The new AHTS will house an anchor handling and towing winch with a capacity of 380-tons pull; the winch will be the largest ever fitted to a U.K.-built ship by Brattvaag. With a gt of approximately 2,350 and a dynamic positioning system, the vessel is scheduled for a February 2002 delivery.

Vietnam Ship Anchors in U.S. Port

The Vinashin Victory oil tanker owned by the Bien Dong Transport Company, a member of the Vietnam Shipbuilding Industry Group, became the first Vietnamese ship to anchor at a U.S. port. The tanker carried over 40,000 tons of oil from Japan, crossing the Pacific ocean in 13 days and anchoring at San Francisco port in California on August 23. The Vinashin Victory is the biggest Vietnamese oil tanker with a capacity of 47,000 tons. The tanker has a speed of 15 miles per hour and is on the ABS registry of shipping. The $50m tanker was recently purchased by Vinashin and has been put into use since April 2007. Source: Nhan Dan

US Navy Ship Anchors Off Coast of Lebanon

The USS Nashville anchored off the coast of Lebanon on July 20 to receive some 1,200 Americans fleeing fighting to take them to Cyprus. The Nashville was deployed as the United States and other countries ramp up their evacuation operations from the war-torn country. Early on July 20, some 900 Americans arrived safely in Cyprus aboard a luxury cruise ship the Orient Queen. Around 8,000 of the 25,000 Americans in Lebanon have asked to be evacuated. The Nashville was one of several Navy ships that headed to Lebanon late July 19 to assist with the evacuation. Most evacuees are leaving by sea as officials from several countries deemed the overland route to Syria too dangerous and Israel knocked Beirut's airport out of service last week by bombing its runways. (Source: washingtonpost.com)

No Funding in '08 for Va. Ghost Fleet Removal

There won't be any Ghost Fleet ships towed out of the James River next year. MarAd, which oversees the Virginia's James River Reserve Fleet, says the most serious environmental threats have been removed, so it won't spend money next year to remove the 44 rusting ships that are still there. MarAd will focus on disposing of ships in California and Texas instead. The ships anchored off Fort Eustis are contaminated with asbestos and cancer-causing P-C-Bs. Local and state officials want to dispose of the ships as soon as possible, fearing the environmental damage that could unfold with severe weather such as a hurricane. About 55 ships have been removed from the James River fleet since 2002. Source: Daily Press

Repairs to Internet Cables Begin in Gulf

A repair ship began work at the site where an Internet cable was cut last week in the Persian Gulf, and a second vessel was to arrive later that day at the spot north of Egypt where two other cables were cut just two days earlier, FLAG Telecom said. The cuts have disrupted Internet services across a large swath of the Middle East and India, slowing down businesses and hampering personal Internet usage. There has been wide speculation that the cuts were caused by ships' anchors dragged along the bottom of the sea in stormy weather. But Egypt's telecommunication ministry said Sunday no ships were registered near the location when the first cut in the cables occurred, north of the Egyptian port of Alexandria. The Egyptian statement further deepened the enigma of how the damage happened.

Collision, Grounding and Anchor Draggings in Chesapeake Bay

The U.S. Coast Guard is working with local response agencies and the Virginia and Maryland Pilots Tuesday after receiving a report of a collision between two ships in the Thimble Shoal Channel and are responding to several subsequent reports of ships dragging anchor in the lower Chesapeake Bay. The 79-foot rig vessel, Petite, and the 1065-foot container ship, MSC Charleston, reportedly collided due to weather in the main ship channel at approximately 7:30 p.m. There was no initial report of damage, pollution or injuries to either vessel, and both are safely anchored pending a Coast Guard investigation. Winds gusting to 70 mph at Cape Henry caused 12 ships anchored in the vicinity of Lynnhaven to drag anchor and caused the 751-foot bulk carrier…

Engineers Die During Routine Inspection

Two Royal Engineers were killed and a third injured in an accident during a routine inspection of a coal ship in Northern Ireland. They said there was no indication of terrorist involvement or an altercation between the English engineers and the crew of the Philippine-registered Diamond Bulker, which was carrying a cargo of coal from Colombia. "They were on board the vessel that was being subjected to the search and they met their end in the hold area," an army spokesman said. The two engineers, who were working with the Royal Navy, may have been overcome by fumes, hit by shifting cargo or fallen off a ladder during a check of the ship anchored in Lough Foyle in Londonderry late on Wednesday, he said.

Pilot Boat Capsizes, One Dead

The body of the missing man from the pilot boat that capsized was located 3 miles south of the Galveston Jetties. A T & T Dive Team went into the water this morning and searched the capsized pilot boat, locating the missing pilot still inside. The man's body was taken to Coast Guard Station Galveston, where the captain of the Texas City Pilots Association was waiting. The pilot boat capsized Saturday afternoon after picking up a pilot from a research ship anchored in Galveston Bay. Another pilot boat in the area spotted the capsized boat and called in a mayday to the Coast Guard. A rescue boat from Station Galveston and a helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Houston conducted searches Saturday evening and again this morning. The Coast Guard is investigating the cause of the incident.

The Next Oil Boom: Brazil’s Lula Field

According to a report from the Houston Chronicla, Brazil's quest to remake itself into a global oil superpower is gaining momentum on a giant ship anchored about 200 miles south of Rio de Janeiro in the deep waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Crews on a tanker-like vessel recently began extracting the first barrels of oil from a giant field known as Lula, more than three miles below. A vast network of nearby "pre-salt" reservoirs are estimated to hold 50 billion to 100 billion barrels of oil — enough to turn Brazil into one of the world's top five producers of crude.     (Source: The Houston Chronicle)

USS Mount Whitney Wins Golden Anchor Award for Retention

Sailors stationed aboard the U.S. 6th Fleet command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), paint the ship’s anchor gold during the golden anchor ceremony March 19, 2015. The golen anchor signifies an outstanding reten

The crew of the U.S. 6th Fleet command and control ship USS Mount Whitney (LCC 20), painted the ship’s anchor gold March 19, 2015, after being awarded the Retention Excellence Award, for fiscal year 2014. Throughout the year, Mount Whitney maintained an overall retention rate of 88.2 percent, and reenlisted a total of 15 Sailors throughout the year, which earned them the honor of receiving the Golden Anchor Award. The golden anchor is presented annually to commands that meet or exceed annual retention goals for each reenlistment zone…

CG Monitoring Oil Spill Off Savannah Coast

U.S. Coast Guard photo/Petty Officer 2nd Class Mary Strauss

The Coast Guard is continuing to monitor an oil spill approximately nine miles offshore of Savannah after a tank ship damaged its double-hulled fuel tank during the deployment of the ship's anchor Sept. 27. The Singapore-based tank ship, Stolt Vision, reportedly sustained a rupture to the starboard fuel tank located beneath the water surface while lowering its anchor at approximately 5:50 p.m. Sept. A first light over flight conducted by an Air Station Savannah HH-65 helicopter crew confirmed that the oil sheen has dissipated. Air crews covered approximately 100 square miles.

Cruise Ship Breaks Free from Moorings

Coast Guard Lt. Ronald Fogan and Petty Officer 2nd Class Josh Hobson review the voyage data recorder of the cruise ship Ecstasy, while some of the ship’s officers look on. The Coast Guard received a report that the Ecstasy, currently housing New Orleans Police Department officers, had broken free from its moorings at the Poland Street Wharf and was drifting down the Mississippi River near downtown New Orleans. Fogan, a foreign vessel inspector, and Hobson, a marine investigator, were dispatched from Coast Guard Sector New Orleans to investigate. There were no reported injuries or marine accidents in association with the incident. The incident remains under investigation by Coast Guard Sector New Orleans. U.S. The Coast Guard responded to the report of an 855-ft.

Containerships Figure in Disaster Relief Plan

Photo credit DARPA

The US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's  (DARPA)  Tactically Expandable Maritime Platform (TEMP) program has completed the design of innovative technologies to transform commercial container ships into self-contained floating supply bases during disaster relief operations, without needing port infrastructure. The program envisions a container ship anchoring offshore of a disaster area, and the ship’s crew delivering supplies ashore using DARPA-developed, modular on-board cranes and air- and sea-delivery vehicles.

Grand Cayman to Build Cruise Ship Dock

The island of Grand Cayman, which has long resisted building a cruise ship dock out of concern about environmental damage that would result from dredging a channel into George Town Harbor, has now decided to start development of a dock for four ships, according to Cruise Ship Report. The initial phase, an environmental impact assessment, has just started. Currently, cruise ships anchor off George Town, and tenders ferry their thousands of passengers back and forth to town. At some times of year, cruise ships are forced to skip scheduled visits to the island because the shallow waters off Grand Cayman are too rough for tendering. This is seen as inconvenient by major cruise lines whose ships visit Grand Cayman and prefer to be able to tie up at a dock…

Ship System and Component Manufacturers Discuss Past and Future

The Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus (CSC) co-chaired by Representatives Gene Taylor (D-MS) and Jo Ann Davis (R-VA), met with ship component manufacturers on the impact that low rates of naval shipbuilding have had on their companies and the challenges confronting the ship manufacturing industrial base. The ship manufacturers that met with the Caucus included: Mr. Craig Hansen of BWXT/ Babcock and Wilcox in Mount Vernon, IN; Mr. Walter Herr of Fairbanks Morse Engine in Beloit, WI; Mr. Roy Arnold of IMECO, Inc. in Iron Mountain, MI; Mr. Michael Stobbart of Lister Chain and Forge, Inc. in Blaine, WA; and Mr. Terry Sterling of Nelson Stud Welding in Elyria, OH.

Ships Warned of Theft in Malacca, Singapore Straits

Photo: Indonesian Navy

Sea Security Group has warned commercial ships passing through the Malacca and Singapore straits to be alert for possible theft by local people and pirates while traversing Asia's busiest straits, says a report in Jakarta Post. Based on information from seafarers, the straits were vulnerable to theft by locals using pancung (small wooden boats). According to intelligence data, from January to February there were 17 reports of theft using pancung filed by commercial ships moored or sailing in the area, he said. The commander said the Navy was stepping up patrols to catch the pirates.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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