Marine Link
Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Sopwith Camel News

This Day in Naval History – Sept. 22

1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines 1960 - First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, VA (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History – Sept. 24

1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines 1960 - First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, VA (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History – September 24

1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines 1960 - First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, VA (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History - Sept. 24

From the Navy News Service 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - Fifth Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines. 1960 - First nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVN 65), launched at Newport News, Va.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 24

Enterprise (CVAN-65) was christened on Saturday, 24 September 1960. (Photo: Ron Reeves)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 24 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines 1960 - First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, Va. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 24

USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) is launched September 24, 1960 at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 24 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines 1960 - First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, Va. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.

This Day in Navy History - September 23-25

1779 - Captain John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 - LT Alfred Pride pilots Navy's first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 autogiro, in landings and takeoffs on board USS Langley while underway. 1944 - USS West Virginia (BB-48) reaches Pearl Harbor and rejoins the Pacific Fleet, marking the end of the salvage and reconstruction of 18 ships damaged at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1941 - In first successful U.S. Navy escort of convoys during World War II, Navy escort turn over HX-150 to British escorts at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. All ships reach port safely.

This Day In Naval History - March 9

USS Cowpens (CG 63) (Photo: U.S. Navy)

1847 - An Army-Navy force begins the siege of Veracruz, Mexico. Approximately 12,000 U.S. troops land on the beaches, along with their horses, mules, artillery, and supplies. Veracruz surrenders March 29, and the forces make their way to Mexico City. 1862 - In the first battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia engage in close combat in Hampton Roads, Va. Neither side could claim victory, but it eventually ends the era of wooden ships. 1919 - The first flight from a battleship platform is made by Lt. Cmdr. Edward O. McDonnell in a Sopwith Camel from turret No.

Berthing a Submarine

Berthing a fast attack or fleet ballistic missile (Trident) submarine requires skilled vessel handling, knowledge and practice. The larger Trident subs are 560 ft. long with a beam of 42 ft. and displace almost 17,000 tons. When maneuvering them into port a deep draft camel is a crucial aide to optimizing berthing and mooring procedures. The camel creates and maintains separation between a sub and a waterfront facility. Deflecting or compressing with vessel movement, the camel prevents damage to the hull…

This Day in Naval History - Feb. 15

1856 - USS Supply, commanded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experimental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 - The battleship USS Maine "mysteriously" blows up in Havana Harbor in Cuba, killing more than 260 Sailors and Marines while injuring scores more. The tragedy sparks the Spanish-American War. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval Historical Center Web site at www.history.navy.mil.

Seabees Build on Combat Skills

Dusty and hot: that's April in Kuwait. These are perfect conditions for a day on the firing range, where the training department of Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133 spends plenty of time. The department is responsible for training every Seabee who comes through Kuwait. On this particular day, NMCB 28 received Enhanced Marksmanship Training, a course of fire which includes training in combat movement, search and assess procedures, magazine change drills and weapon malfunction exercises. Over the course of two days, nearly 150 members of NMCB 28 fired approximately 20,000 rounds of ammunition from distances ranging from three to 25 meters.

Distressed Surfers Rescued Off Trinidad

Emblem USCG

A Coast Guard aircrew rescued two distressed surfers near Trinidad Saturday afternoon. At approximately 4:30 p.m., watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Humboldt Bay received a call from a person ashore stating his friends needed assistance and were stranded on Camel Rock. A Coast Guard MH-65 helicopter aircrew was launched from Sector Humboldt Bay and within minutes were on scene at Camel Rock, approximately one-quarter mile offshore. They discovered two distressed surfers needing assistance. The rescue swimmer was lowered to the surfers to determine their condition.

This Day in Naval History - February 15th

From the Navy News Service:   1856 - USS Supply, commanded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experimental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 - The battleship USS Maine "mysteriously" blows up in Havana Harbor in Cuba, killing more than 260 Sailors and Marines while injuring scores more. The tragedy sparks the Spanish-American War.   For more information about naval history, visit the Naval Historical Center Web site at www.history.navy.mil.  

Latest DofD Navy Contracts

Great Lakes Dock and Materials LLC, Muskegon, Mich., has been awarded a firm-fixed-price, non-option eligible, non-multi-year US ACE contract for $7,461,751 for the repair of 0.5 miles of breakwater at Cleveland Harbor. FLIR Systems Inc., Billerica, Mass., has been awarded a $49,852,526 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract on Sept. 19, 2013, for the Patrol Boat Electro-Optics System (PB-EOS) for the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Navy. The primary mission of the PB-EOS is to provide enhanced visual imagery to augment existing electronic sensors. Use of the PB-EOS will enhance the following: low visibility and night navigation…

MAIB Blames 'Structural Weakness' in Cheeki Rafiki Capsize

Cheeki Rafiki file photo by Corriere

An accident report into the loss of the Cheeki Rafiki mid-way through a transatlantic crossing last May, found that undetected damage to fittings around the keel after a string of earlier groundings are among the likely causes, says the Telegraph. The loss of four UK sailors in the Atlantic was "a tragic accident", the head of the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) said. Days later the hull of the 40ft yacht was found with its life raft still on board. There was no sign of the crew.

Skipper Sentenced for Fishing Without Navigation Lights

At a hearing today at Truro Crown Court, the owner/skipper of a fishing boat was handed a 28 day prison sentence - suspended for two years - and ordered to pay £500 in costs after pleading guilty to breaches of the International regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea. Between January 8, 2013 and June 3, 2013 Dean James Rollason was observed on five occasions operating a fishing vessel without navigation lights at night. The incidents occurred in the Fowey River, River Camel estuary, Penryn River and off Looe in Cornwall. Several agencies reported the sightings to the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) who instigated legal action after reviewing the evidence. Four of the offences were committed in a small fishing vessel Top Dog, owned by Rollason.

UK P&I's New Approach to Risk Management

The UK P&I Club takes a BowTie approach to risk management. Marine mutuals like the UK P&I Club are committed to reducing the number and size of insurance claims they receive. After all, in the P&I world, members own their respective clubs and through pool arrangements within individual clubs, they in effect pay their own claims. The smaller the level of claims, the healthier the club becomes and this has a knock-on effect on the cost of insuring through the club. After much study and only after in-depth trials with certain shipowners…

Memo to the New Staten Island Ferries: Welcome to New York

How long does it take to build a double-ended municipal ferryboat? Any boat with two bows should have two answers, if not more. If by "build a ferryboat" we mean from the moment we start laying the keel to the moment the boat hits the water, we could say a ferryboat takes eleven months to build. Or anyway, that's how long it took Marinette Marine, Inc., a division of Manitowoc Corporation, to build the first in "the new Kennedy class" - at 310-feet and 7.1 million pounds loaded, with a $40-million price tag, the largest vessel constructed by the yard. Altogether, there are three. "The second two were identical," said Marinette Marine's Duane Roehm, Vice-President, Program Management and Planning, "but during the construction of the first, there was a strike.

Rib Report

AB Inflatables Delivers For Diversity Of Applications

Deepwater Horizon—Further proof that oil and water don’t mix

Maritime Reporter invited Carleen Lyden-Kluss, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the North American Marine Environment Protection Association to provide an overview of the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. On April 20, our maritime world changed. No matter how you slice it, everyone in the maritime industry feels the effects of the tragedy; the loss of 11 lives and injury to 17 others, the extensive environmental impact, the economic fallout and ongoing costs, the exposure of weaknesses in the response system, and the regulatory changes that will result from this. The details of the event are well known:  the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, also called the BP Oil Spill/the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, is now considered the largest offshore spill in U.S. history.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2017 - The Workboat Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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