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Sunday, July 22, 2018

Steel Prices News

Interview: Mark Knoy, President and CEO, ACBL

Mark K. Knoy, president and CEO of American Commercial Barge Line

American Commercial Barge Line (ACBL) named Mark K. Knoy as its president and chief executive officer in August 2011. Prior to joining ACBL, he was vice president of American Electric Power’s (AEP) Fuel, Emissions and Logistics Group and president of AEP River Operations, having joined AEP with its 2001 purchase of MEMCO Barge Line. From 1984 to 1994, he was owner/operator of The Mark Twain Towing Company and Delmar Marine, Inc., Pekin, Illinois. He began his career in 1973 working aboard towboats on the inland waterways as a deck hand and then as a captain.

Newbuild Spending Dropped Sharply in Q2

© Mariusz Niedzwiedzki / Adobe Stock

Enthusiasm for newbuild orders across most shipping markets has started to wane after more than $10 billion dollars were committed in the first quarter of 2018, according to VesselsValue. The total committed to new deliveries is now the lowest since the start of 2016.Ordering trends in the start of the year were highest in the markets that were seeing the highest returns. This includes the dry bulk and liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier markets, while interest in the low earnings environment tanker markets was softer.

U.S. Allies Facing Steel Import Quotas Could Be Worse Off

© guruXOX / Adobe Stock

U.S. government moves to negotiate steel import quotas with its allies in exchange for tariff exemptions could leave them worse off than countries who have to pay the levy.Washington set tariffs of 25 percent on U.S. steel imports in March, but has since granted the European Union, Canada and Mexico temporary exemptions until June 1.It has also agreed permanent exemptions for Brazil, Australia, Argentina and South Korea in return for quotas.South Korea, for example, agreed to quotas restricting its steel sales to the United States by 30 percent…

Oil Tanker Scrapping to Hit Multi-year High

© Evren Kalinbacak / Adobe Stock

The shipping industry will this year scrap the largest number of oil tankers in over half-a-decade, driven by weak earnings, firm prices for scrap steel and the need to prepare fleets for strict new environmental regulations.The surge in scrapping underscores how the sector is grappling with one of its worst-ever crises, hit hard after rates for transporting oil plunged to multi-year lows in the wake of excess tanker supply and tepid demand as OPEC production cuts bite."The tanker markets are definitely in a trough at the moment…

2017-2021 Tanker Market Outlook: McQuilling

Photo Dariusz T. Oczkowicz; AdobeStock

McQuilling Services has released its 20th Anniversary Edition 2017-2021 Tanker Market Outlook. This 200-page report provides a five-year spot and time charter equivalent (TCE) outlook for eight vessel classes across 19 benchmark tanker trades, plus two triangulated trades. Also included in the report is a robust five-year asset price outlook as well as a one and three-year time charter forecast through 2021. With 20 years of tanker rate forecasting expertise, McQuilling Services is a leader in the industry and continues to support a variety of stakeholders in the energy…

China's Steel, Coal Curbs a Double-edged Sword for Imports

© Igor Groshev / Adobe Stock

China's determination to tackle its choking pollution by cutting steel and coal capacity should be a long-term negative for exporters of iron ore and coal to the world's biggest commodity importer, but the reality is likely to be far more nuanced. "We will make our skies blue again," Premier Li Keqiang told the opening of parliament on Sunday. That's an unequivocal statement that gives political impetus to Beijing's plans to shutter more excess steel and coal capacity. The policy…

Baltic Index Gains on Robust Capesize Rates

© EvrenKalinbacak / Adobe Stock

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, tracking rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, jumped to a more-than-three-month high on Wednesday, as rates for capesize vessels soared. The overall index, which also factors in rates for panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels, ended up 35 points, or 3.15 percent, at 1,147 points, its highest since Dec. The capesize index increased 207 points, or 10.73 percent, to close at 2,136 points, its biggest gain since early December.

Capesize ‘Uptick’ Not Strong Enough for an Upsurge

April 19, 2016. The latest Dry Bulk Freight Forecaster from Maritime Strategies International* analyses the recent uptick in the Capesize market and considers the positive trends and mitigating factors. MSI finds the indicators are relatively positive in the short-term for iron ore trade. On the supply-side, iron ore prices of $50-60/tonne are in profitable territory for the big iron ore miners and will no doubt support the ramp up of new export capacity in Australia and Brazil. On the demand side, an uptick in steel prices and steel production in China in March underpins more positive sentiment. In addition, concerns of high iron ore stockpiles in China are overplayed…

Baltic Index Rises to Five-month High

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index tracking rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, on Tuesday rose to its highest in over five months on improved rates across vessel segments. The overall index, which factors in rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels, gained 12 points, or 1.82 percent to 671 points. While current earnings are barely covering direct vessel operating costs, rates are on the rise primarily due to stronger Chinese steel prices boosting seaborne iron ore trade, ship brokerage Clarksons Platou Securities said in a note on Tuesday. Shipments of iron ore account for about a third of seaborne volumes on the larger capesizes, and iron ore price changes are a key factor for dry freight.

Death Toll On The Rise at Chittagong Shipbreaking Yards

Photo Courtesy: NGO Shipbreaking Platform – Hanjin Rome beached in Chittagong, Bangladesh

Two workers lost their lives at the Chittagong shipbreaking yards in the last two weeks, bringing the total death toll this year to six workers, reports NGO Shipbreaking Platform. On 6 May, 26-year-old Shahinoor died at Jamuna Shipbreaking yard. He fell from a great height when he was breaking the Hanjin Rome, which was the first vessel arrested after the collapse of one of the largest container ship companies last year – the Korean company Hanjin Shipping. The Hanjin Rome was put up for auction by the High Court in Singapore to be sold to the highest bidder early this year.

Baltic Index Up On Stronger Rates

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, which tracks rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, rose on Friday due to higher demand for capesizes and gains across smaller vessel segments. The overall index, which factors in rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels, was up 18 points, or about 3 percent to 688 points. The capesize index, rose 81 points, or about 8 percent to 1,085 points. Average daily earnings for capesizes, which typically transport 150,000-tonne cargoes such as iron ore and coal, rose $577 to $8,216. Iron ore is on track to post its biggest weekly gain ever after a rapid rise that lifted it to its strongest since June 2015 as a rally in Chinese steel prices burnished appetite for the raw material.

Baltic Index Down for 15th Straight Day

© Stanislav Komogorov / Adobe Stock

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, tracking rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, on Monday fell for the 15th straight session, hurt by weak rates across all vessel segments. The overall index — which considers rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels — fell 9 points, or 1.08 percent, to 821 points, its lowest level in over three months. The capesize index shed 21 points, or 1.53 percent, to end at 1,353 points. Average daily earnings for capesizes, which typically transport 150,000-tonne cargoes such as iron ore and coal, dipped $128 to $9,837.

Dry Bulk Shipping: Improved Frieght Rates Despite Continues Fleet Growth

Graph: BIMCO

On 10 February 2016, the Baltic Dry Index (BDI) hit 290. At that point, a bulk carrier regardless of its size, age and fuel-efficient qualities earned a time charter average of USD 2,417-2,776 per day. Whereas the three smaller segments have seen higher earnings since then, capesize earnings lost ground up until the end of March. By mid-April, the gap closed and capesizes are back on par with the pack. Despite the fact that earnings have doubled in those two months, they remain below OPEX levels for the largest part of the fleet.

Baltic Index Falls on Weaker Capesize Rates

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, tracking rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, fell on Tuesday weighed down by lower rates for capesize vessels. The overall index, which factors in rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels, was down 22 points, or 3.57 percent at 594 points. The capesize index fell 85 points, or 10.16 percent to 752 points. "Cape rates continue to slip back on thinner volumes following recent pressure on Chinese steel prices," ship brokerage firm Clarksons Platou Securities said in a note. Chinese rebar steel futures posted their biggest intraday fall in seven years on Tuesday, as worries about demand in the world's second-biggest economy extended a rout that has spilled over into other industrial raw materials.

China Steel, Iron Ore Slip Deeper into Bear Territory

Chinese steel and iron ore futures fell deeper into bear market territory on Thursday, as the country's exchanges unveiled more measures aimed at dampening the type of speculative trading behind a powerful rally last month. The aggressive steps to limit speculative buying have helped fuel a retreat in raw materials from steel to coal after the mid-April upsurge that inflated volumes and prices to levels that some analysts felt defied fundamentals. On Wednesday, the Dalian Commodity Exchange said it would set a maximum open interest limit for the trading of a single contract in a certain period, excluding business for hedging purposes. The move is aimed at preventing investors from taking excessive positions.

China's Yangzijiang Triples Q3 Profits

Chinese Shipbuilding Group Yangzijiang posted a third quarter net profit of $130 million which is more than a tripling of its profits in the third quarter last year. The group also managed to exceed its target of $1.5 billion in annual orders. This caused the share price to hit a six year high at $1.64 and the group to increase its annual target for orders to $2 billion for this year and and $2 billion for next year. The group expects to construct and deliver up to 50 vessels each this year and the next in spite of increasing steel prices and the Renminbi appreciating against the dollar. Plans to increase capacity were announced that will allow the builder to attract more value added contracts.

China, Australia Ports Clogged as Coal, Ore Demand Soars

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) Lucasz Z)

Around 300 ships caught in jam that would stretch 40 miles; freight rates for biggest coal, ore carrier hit 3-yr high. More than 300 large dry cargo ships are having to wait outside Chinese and Australian ports in a maritime traffic jam that spotlights bottlenecks in China's huge and global commodity supply chain as demand peaks this winter. With some vessels waiting to load coal and iron ore outside Australian ports for over a month, key charter rates have jumped to their highest in more than three years.

Capesize Rates Post Biggest Weekly Drop in 2 Years

File photo: © HHM / Dietmar Hasenpusch

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index fell on Friday and continued to linger around five month lows as the capesize segment recorded its biggest weekly percentage decline in two years. The overall index, which factors in rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels that ferry dry bulk commodities, shed 14 points, or 1.23 percent, to 1,125 points, the lowest since Aug. 10, 2017. For the week, the index ended 12 percent lower. The capesize index fell 118 points, or 7.32 percent, to 1,493 points, its lowest since Aug.

Baltic Index Posts First Gain in Seven Sessions

© NS Photography / Adobe Stock

The Baltic Exchange's main sea freight index, tracking rates for ships carrying dry bulk commodities, rose for the first time in seven sessions on Tuesday, following a rebound in capesize rates. The overall index, which factors in rates for capesize, panamax, supramax and handysize shipping vessels, edged up 13 points, or 1.2 percent, to 1,095 points. The capesize index snapped its five-session losing streak and climbed 86 points, or 6 percent, to 1,519 points. It touched its lowest in more than six months on Monday.

147 Vessels Sent to Shipbreaking

Photo: NGO Shipbreaking Platform

So far this year 147 vessels have been sent to the shipbreakers for their steel to be recycled, Telegraph reported quoting new data from Braemar ACM shows. A record number of container ships have been scrapped this year as owners battle a perfect storm of vast overcapacity and rock-bottom freight rates. The Telegraph report says that the scrapping spree has taken ships with the capacity to carry a total of 507,000 shipping containers – known as twenty-foot equivalent units or TEUs, the unit of measurement used in the industry – out of the global fleet.

Tanker Scrapping is on the Rise -Vessels Value

© katiekk2 / Adobe Stock

Tanker demolition is on the rise as 3.5 million DWT has been scrapped so far in 2018, according to Vessels Value. Each factor played a part as the decision to remove a ship from service varies depending on the financial situation of the owner. Some may be motivated as the $/t offered price offsets enough of their remaining mortgage on a ship to allow them to move out of a low cashflow market, while others may remove a ship after it completes a long-term storage contract. Higher…

Ship Operating Costs Set to Rise -Survey

(File photo: Thomas Poster)

Vessel operating costs are expected to rise in both 2016 and 2017, according to the latest survey by international accountant and shipping consultant Moore Stephens. Repairs and maintenance and spares are the cost categories which are likely to increase most significantly in each of the two years. The survey is based on responses from key players in the international shipping industry, predominantly shipowners and managers in Europe and Asia. Those responses revealed that vessel operating costs are expected to rise by 1.9 percent in 2016 and by 2.5 percent in 2017.

Container Equipment Market Surges Ahead: Drewry

Graph: Drewry Shipping Consultants Limited

The move towards container leasing and away from carrier ownership continues unabated and the leased fleet now has a clear majority over that owned by transport operators, according to the latest edition of the Container Census & Leasing and Equipment Insight published by global shipping consultancy Drewry. Leasing companies accounted for 55% of container purchases in 2017, which continues the trend seen for most of this decade. With the fleet of containers owned by transport operators growing by a mere 2.4%, the leased fleet added 6.7% and the share owned by lessors is now nearing 52%.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jul 2018 - Marine Communications Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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