Marine Link
Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Steel Replacement News

BC Ferries Vessel Ready After Upgrade

BC Ferries' Queen of Surrey returns to service today on the Langdale – Horseshoe Bay route following a $40m extensive upgrade. The vessel’s extensive upgrade included mechanical and safety improvements, as well as upgraded passenger amenities. This mid-life upgrade which took almost seven months to complete, will prepare the 25-year old vessel for another 20 years of service. Some of the major project work included, main engine and shaft upgrades, steel replacement, electrical upgrades, installation of new emergency evacuation equipment, modernization of service functions such as elevators, heating and ventilation and air conditioning systems.

Detyens Wins Medgar Evers Overhaul Contract

USNS Medgar Evers (U.S. Navy photo by J. M. Tolbert)

Detyens Shipyards Inc. said it was awarded a $13.6 million firm-fixed-price contract for a 60-calendar day shipyard availability for the regular overhaul and dry-docking of U.S. Navy’ Military Sealift Command (MSC) cargo ship USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13). According to the shipyard, work will include clean and gas-free tanks, voids, cofferdams and spaces, deckhouse preservation, main generator maintenance and cleaning, high-voltage switchboard and emergency switchboard cleaning…

Zentech to Perform ZAIMS Work on Brazilian Aircraft Carrier

Aircraft Carrier São Paulo at sea (Image: Zentech)

Zentech’s President Ramesh Maini announced that the company has been awarded a contract to perform an inspection and evaluation of the hull steel for the Naval Aircraft Carrier São Paulo, as part of the Brazilian Navy’s upgrade of this flagship vessel. Zentech will perform the work using the patented methodology of its ZAIMS (Zentech’s Asset Integrity Management Solution) system to assist the Brazilian Navy in assessing the sea-worthiness of the vessel’s hull. The initial work involves corrosion inspection…

Judgement Pronounced in Dispute

After a dispute lasting several years, a court in London has ordered Concordia Maritime to pay $3.6m to a subsidiary of the Halliburton group in the US. Concordia Maritime will also have to pay some interest compensation to the opposite party. The original claim of $11.5m was for compensation for repair and steel replacement work carried out by the buyer on the VLCC Stena Continent sold by a subsidiary of Concordia Maritime in 2000. A provision of $2.3mwas made in the annual accounts for 2005. In view of the judgement now pronounced, Concordia Maritime has lowered its forecast for 2006 from SEK 75 million to SEK 55 million. There is a possibility that either party may appeal the court’s ruling but no decisions on this have yet been made.

Mobile Yard Stays Busy With Offshore Work

Even before the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C., the offshore market in the Gulf of Mexico had shown signs of weakening. However one shipyard — Atlantic Marine-Mobile — has reported a steady flow of work with the award of several, substantial offshore refurbishment contracts in recent months. The shipyard in Mobile has a long history with the offshore market, but it notes that 2001 has been particularly busy. Semi-submersible and jack-up rigs have occupied the Mobile, Alabama facility throughout 2001. The influx of offshore work includes the following. ENSCO International's jack-up rig ENSCO 68, arrived in Mobile in late March.

Vigor Wins $10.3M Navy Repair Deal

Vigor Marine LLC, Portland, Oregon, is being awarded a $10,268,877 firm-fixed-price contract for a 45-calendar day shipyard availability for the regular overhaul and dry docking of USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9). Work will include clean and gas-free tanks, voids, cofferdams and spaces, deckhouse preservation, main generator maintenance and cleaning, high voltage switchboard and emergency switchboard cleaning, shell and deck steel replacement, dry-docking and undocking, propeller shaft and stern tube inspect, forward and aft stern tube seal inspection and overhaul, underwater hull cleaning and painting, freeboard cleaning and painting,  sea valve replacements, renew flight deck nonskid, and reverse osmosis unit sea-chest installation.

Coatings: Metal Fusion Helps Stop Corrosion

New advances in metal fusion technology produce a metalized coating with no porosity, which can be applied at rates similar to those achieved by airless painting practices. The substrate temperature does not affect the process, and there is no curing time. The competitive process results in extremely long term near permanent corrosion protection, which is designed to be competitive in price with conventional corrosion systems. High speed metalizing of a variety of substrates can be accomplished rapidly under harsh field conditions. As there is no cure time required for the process, which can be used to apply up to 35 mils with only one coat, the application time is often much reduced from a conventional corrosion prevention system.

Grand Bahama Shipyard Appoints UK Representative

Carnival Glory (Photo: GBS)

Grand Bahama Shipyard and L&R Midland (UK) Ltd have signed an exclusive agency agreement covering the U.K. markets effective June 1, 2017. Caribbean shipyard Grand Bahama Shipyard (GBS) has engaged L&R Midland (UK) as its representative in the U.K. in what is expected to be an increasingly busy period due to approaching new International Maritime Organization (IMO) regulations that will require ballast water treatment systems (BWTS) and exhaust gas cleaning systems (EGCS) retrofits.

Grand Bahama Shipyard Stayed Busy in 2016

V Ships USA LLC Boston - CSL Acadian (Photo: Grand Bahama Shipyard)

The Caribbean shipyard Grand Bahama Shipyard Limited (GBSL) worked on 49 commercial vessels and 20 cruise ships throughout 2016, with scope of works ranging from major steel fabrication and repairs, to engine and technical systems overhauls, hull treatment and tank cleanings. And looking to 2017 and beyond, the yard reports it has a healthy order book, with docking periods secured as far ahead as three years. VShips USA brought two bulk carriers, CSL Acadian and CSL Argosy, to GBSL to do tank cleaning on both vessels. CSL Acadian also received extensive pipe work.

Mobile Yard Stays Busy With Offshore Work

Even before the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C., the offshore market in the Gulf of Mexico had shown signs of weakening. However one shipyard - Atlantic Marine-Mobile - has reported a steady flow of work with the award of several, substantial offshore refurbishment contracts in recent months. The shipyard in Mobile has a long history with the offshore market, but it notes that 2001 has been particularly busy. Semi-submersible and jack-up rigs have occupied the Mobile, Alabama facility throughout 2001. The influx of offshore work includes the following. ENSCO International's jack-up rig ENSCO 68, arrived in Mobile in late March.

Feature: Real Repair

It is no secret that the overwhelming number of marine repair jobs at the nation's shipyards involves regulatory inspections. For example, the 150-ft. supply boat Mary R. Martin was in at Allied Shipyard, Larose, La. in mid-July for ABS and Coast Guard inspection and the change out of a few seals. The boat was dry docked for the inspections and minor repair work, her hull blasted and painted and after a few topside repairs in the slip and more paint work she was back at work. That type of "shave and a haircut" work is typical at Allied and other repair yards, but they are capable of much more complex work that literally extends the life of a vessel by many years. Earlier this year Allied finished a complete work over of the 195-ft. by 40-ft. supply boat Ms.

Ship Repair & Conversion Report

Subsequent to the departure of Holland America's Statendam in April, Cascade General took in Crystal Cruises' Crystal Harmony for a 10-day stopover in May. The 10-year-old ship underwent maintenance and overhaul work below its waterline, extensive interior remodeling and steel replacement for pool areas on Deck 11. With maximization of work in mind, Cascade normally sends advanced crews to join cruise ships on their way to the yard's Portland, Ore. locale. This time though, the first mobile crew met the ship in Los Angeles, where work commenced immediately on an overhaul of one of Harmony's auxiliary boilers. A second team was then summoned to San Francisco to clean ballast tanks before undertaking structural repairs and preservation work. easuring 790 ft.

Austal Secures Contract for High-speed Ferries

Two 117m high-speed vehicle passenger ferries to be built by Austal for Fred Olsen S.A. of Spain (Image: Austal)

Austal has announced a milestone contract, valued at €126 million (A$190 million), to design and build two 117 metre high-speed vehicle passenger trimaran ferries for long term customer Fred Olsen S.A. of the Canary Islands, Spain. The aluminium trimarans, designed by Austal Australia, will be the second and third trimarans to be delivered to Fred Olsen S.A. who already operate the world’s first and largest trimaran vehicle passenger ferry, the Benchijigua Express – designed and built by Austal in 2005.

Harley Marine's Tier 2 Repower

As of January 2007 all new-built vessels for service in US waters are required to be powered with engines that meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's Tier 2 emission standards. It has been a significant engineering and logistics challenge for the nation?s engine manufacturers to meet these deadlines. Cummins Marine was able to meet the deadline and is shipping Tier 2 engines in the full horsepower range. Although Tier 2 is a requirement for all new vessels, at Olympic Tug and Barge the owners, Harley Marine Services, have shown leadership by installing a pair of Tier 2 compliant engines in their 1970-built tug Lela Joy. This will make her one of the most environmentally progressive vessels on the Pacific coast.

Hyper-Accelerated Corrosion Found In Doomed Tanker

Investigators hoping to find the cause of why an assumed healthy ship developed a near fatal deckplate crack - an incident which led to a 39-day saga which will serve as an impetus for change in the rules of the way ships in distress are handled - have issued a preliminary report. Following an exhaustive inspection and analysis of the damaged product tanker Castor, the Cyprus Department of Merchant Shipping and ABS have jointly announced preliminary findings that point to hyper-accelerated corrosion as the probable principal cause behind the structural failure. "The Castor has become a floating laboratory which is providing us with some surprising findings," said ABS Chairman and CEO Frank J. Iarossi.

Castor's Downfall: Hyper-Accelerated Corrosion

Few marine incidents have vexed the collective international marine community as much as the recent situation with the damaged product tanker Castor, a ship, which experienced a near fatal deckplate crack in mid-voyage and then was denied safe harbor for fear of the ship splitting open and spewing its gasoline cargo. Though the ship was eventually docked safely without environmental incident, the name Castor will serve as a lightning rod in the IMO to more firmly establish rules and procedures for ships in distress at sea. As the political wrangling and finger pointing start to subside, attention is now turned on the ship itself, and more accurately finding out the reason that an assumed healthy ship developed a near fatal deckplate crack.

OTI Installs Thordon's Largest TG100 Seal

Photo: Thordon Bearings

Offshore Towing Inc (OTI) has completed the refurbishment of its 1974-built 9000hp-class tug Zion Falgout at the Conrad Deepwater shipyard, in Morgan City, La. The milestone project involved the retrofitting of TG100 seals in what marks OTI’s first mechanical shaft seal installation and the largest diameter TG100 series seals ever supplied by Thordon Bearings. An 11.75in (298mm) diameter seal was installed to each propeller shaft of the 66.88t bollard pull twin-screw workhorse.

St. Lawrence Seaway Cargo Volumes Buoyant

The Canada-flag Algolake loading wheat at the CHS elevator in the Port of Duluth-Superior. (Photo by: Terry White / Chamber of Marine Commerce)

As marine shipping continues to support the growth of the Canadian and U.S. economies, St. Lawrence Seaway cargo shipments to-date for 2917 are 14 percent ahead of 2016 volumes. Total cargo tonnage from March 20 to September 30 reached 24.3 million metric tons – 3 million metric tons more compared to the same period in 2016, according to The St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation. “Our results point to the strength of the Canadian and U.S. economies. Export shipments of mined products such as iron ore and dry bulk via the Seaway have grown dramatically this year…

Global Shiprepair Market Faces Further Consolidation, Competition

For those convinced that the latest round of corporate consolidations is the last, think again. According to a new report from Drewry, the announcement by Keppel and Hitachi to further amalgamate the shiprepair industry in Singapore is the latest indication of a changing market structure through increased consolidation, diversification and an increased competitiveness from low cost emerging nations. The intense competition prevalent within the industry is exemplified by the announcement of the two giant Singapore based conglomerates Keppel Corp. and Hitachi Zosen to merge their shiprepair and building activities in a $165-million deal…

Ferry Experts and Legislators to Discuss Steel Electric Ferries

Washington State Ferries will hold meetings regarding the status of the Steel Electric class vessels and Port Townsend/Keystone ferry service. Legislators and staff from affected ferry communities, Secretary of Transportation Paula Hammond and Washington State Ferries Executive Director Mike Anderson will review current ferry status and discuss future vessel and service options. John Boylston, Naval Architect, Legislative Joint Transportation Committee consultants and WSF engineers will present Steel Electric repair and replacement options. Legislators and their staff, shipyard representatives, Secretary of Transportation Paula Hammond and Washington State Ferries Executive Director Mike Anderson will likely attend. The meetings will be held in the Rainier Conference Room.

Dutch Shipyard Beats the Clock to Fix Dredger

Dredger Amazone: Photo credit Shipdock Harlingen

Shipdock Harlingen repairs the 'Amazone', a De Boer Trailing Suction Hopper Dredger (TSHD) to meet owner's next contract deadlne. "Occasionally a project comes along that sticks in your memory as being truly exceptional”, says Michel Heerschop, project manager at Shipdock Harlingen, referrring to the contract awarded to Shipdock Harlingen by Sliedrecht-based dredging company De Boer for dry-dock work on its TSHD Amazone. The Amazone was scheduled for a special certification review this year and, additionally, there were many necessary maintenance jobs and modifications to be carried out.

Australia Announces Patrol Boat Tender

HMAS Launceston (Photo: Royal Australian Navy)

The Australian Government announced a Request for Tender (RFT) to replace the Pacific Patrol Boats under the Pacific Maritime Security Program, Project SEA3036 Phase 1. The project involves the construction in Australia of up to 21 steel-hulled replacement patrol vessels, representing an investment in the nation’s defense industry with the Australian-made patrol boats worth $594 million in addition to through life sustainment and personnel costs estimated at $1.38 billion over 30 years.

Meyer Turku Continues Shipyard Investments

Photo: MEYER TURKU

Meyer Turku shipyard  has further enlarged it’s investment package with a new 75 million euro steel storage and pretreatment facility. This is already a third large scale investment announced this year from Meyer Turku, previous being new Gantry crane and building a new modernized Cabin Factory on the original Piikkio Works cabin factory grounds. The new steel storage and pretreatment facility will increase the steel pretreatment capacity of Meyer Turku, improve dimensional accuracy and increase productivity.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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