LNG Mooring Lines Made with Dyneema

Press Release
Wednesday, October 03, 2012

Safer and Stronger than Steel


The introduction of new and larger vessels, Q-Flex and Q-Max, and new, often more exposed terminals becoming operational have changed mooring dynamics. The need to maintain workers’ safety at all times, whilst delivering maximum operational efficiency through lower costs and faster turnaround times remains unchanged.

DSM Dyneema, a close partner to the LNG industry, has done a study which concludes that these industry trends are changing the performance demands for LNG mooring lines.

In parallel to DSM Dyneema’s investigation, in 2011 members of the LNG community created a Users Group to further investigate HMPE mooring line failures which TTI (UK) was asked to facilitate. DSM Dyneema is part of the Users Group, while at the same time continuing its own investigation program.

DSM Dyneema has drawn up a number of recommendations to address these changing market demands and the 3% fail-rate of HMPE based LNG mooring lines. Key among these is the call for industry-wide standard guidelines for specifying and testing of LNG mooring lines – ensuring the right mooring line is commissioned for any particular working task and environment.

Easy to handle and safe

HMPE based mooring lines have been used in the LNG industry for over a decade and have proven their benefits over time in many different maritime applications such as oil tankers, containers, carriers, bulk cargo vessels, as well as Cruise liners, RoRo and Navy ships.

Ropes with Dyneema, used in 50% of LNG mooring lines, are as strong as steel wire ropes of the same diameter but at only one-seventh of the weight allowing for easier handling. Ropes with Dyneema are about 60% of the diameter and 30% of the weight of equally strong polyester or polyamide ropes.

Proven in practice
BW Shipping, part of the BW Group, one of the world’s leading maritime groups in the oil tanker, gas and offshore segments operating a fleet of 96 owned, part-owned or controlled vessels and FPSOs, has equipped a fleet of 11 tankers with mooring lines made with Dyneema made by Samson Rope Technologies and is seeing significant benefits.

A search for mooring lines that would be safer than conventional steel wire resulted in the selection of AmSteel Blue mooring lines with Dyneema. The lower weight of Dyneema based ropes means reduced deckhand injuries. Moreover, in the unlikely event of a rope failure, ropes with Dyneema show no snap-back like that shown by steel wire rope or polyester and nylon based ropes. Due to the nature of the fiber, effects like fish hooks or broken wire are not present thus preventing hand injuries.


Maritime Reporter October 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

New Products

Seaspan Acquires Sixth 14000 TEU Boxship

Seaspan Corporation  announced today that it accepted delivery of a 14000 TEU containership, the YM Warmth. The new containership, which was constructed at Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.

Wärtsilä 31 Engine for Aker ARC 124 Icebreaker

The recently introduced Wärtsilä 31 engine, which has been acknowledged by Guinness World Records as being the world's most efficient four-stroke diesel engine,

IMTRA Debuts Omega LED lights

IMTRA today released its Omega LED lights. Designed specifically for recessed lighting applications in large yachts, the DC-powered Omega LED lights feature a high-quality,


Creole Spirit Sets Sail for Sea Trials

Teekay’s first M-type, Electronically Controlled, Gas Injection (MEGI)-powered LNG vessel, Creole Spirit, has sailed out from the Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering

Teekay Veteran Glendinning to Retire

Long-time Teekay leader David Glendinning, president of Teekay Gas Services, will retire December 17, 2015, after more than 28 years at Teekay. Stepping up to replace Glendinning is Mark Kremin,

Wärtsilä 31 Engine for Aker ARC 124 Icebreaker

The recently introduced Wärtsilä 31 engine, which has been acknowledged by Guinness World Records as being the world's most efficient four-stroke diesel engine,


US Shipowner Creates Fund for Families of Missing El Faro Crew

The owners of the cargo ship El Faro that sank after it was trapped in the path of Hurricane Joaquin off the Bahamas last week announced the creation of a family

Captain of Ill-fated El Faro was Known as Trusted Mariner

The captain of the ill-fated cargo ship that sank in a hurricane off the Bahamas with no survivors last week was an experienced and highly trusted mariner who had spent a lifetime on the water,

Collision Course with a Hurricane: How Doomed US Ship Met its End

The ill-fated U.S.-flagged El Faro cargo ship sunk by Hurricane Joaquin was sailing at near full speed into the center of the storm before it lost propulsion amid mountainous waves and brutal winds,

Maritime Safety

Cutter Diligence to Return

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Diligence is scheduled to return to their homeport in Wilmington Saturday following a 45-day patrol in the Caribbean Sea. During their patrol,

China Completes lighthouses construction in disputed South China Sea

China has completed the construction of two lighthouses in the disputed South China Sea, the official Xinhua news agency reported, as tensions in the region mount over Beijing's maritime ambitions.

Singapore-issued CoCs need Revalidation

Holders of Singapore-issued certificates of competency (CoCs) need to revalidate their CoCs to meet the requirements of the 2010 Manila amendments to the International

Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Repair Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1327 sec (8 req/sec)