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Friday, January 19, 2018

Guard History News

Coast Guard Honors Station Pea Island

Photo courtesy USCG

Rear Admiral Manson Brown presents the ceremonial flag to Gertrude Collins, the wife of Lt. Herbert Collins (Ret.) at his funeral, March 26, 2010. Lt. Collins was the last surviving member of the historic Coast Guard Station Pea Island, the only station in Coast Guard history to have an all African-American crew. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer Third Class Victoria Bonk.  

Coast Guard To Present Award To Local Historian

The Coast Guard will honor an internationally known historian with one of the highest honors the military service can award members of the public at a Coast Guard unit in Philadelphia on September 17 at 10:30 a.m. William D. Wilkinson, director emeritus of the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, Va., and the founding director of the international Association for Rescue at Sea, will receive the Meritorious Public Service Award at Coast Guard Marine Safety Office/Group Philadelphia. The award will be presented by Rear Adm. Kevin Eldridge, Assistant Commandant for Governmental and Public Affairs, on behalf of the Commandant of the United States Coast Guard, Adm. Thomas Collins. Wilkinson is being recognized for his decades of work supporting the Coast Guard’s history program.

Eastern Shipbuilding Donates $250K to USCG Museum

John S. Johnson, Treasurer of the National Coast Guard Museum Association Inc. celebrates the receipt of Eastern Shipbuilding’s first donation with U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut. (Photo courtesy of the National Coast Guard Museum Association)

Eastern Shipbuilding has donated $250,000 for the construction of the National Coast Guard Museum in New London, Connecticut, the National Coast Guard Museum Association announced yesterday. Eastern Shipbuilding, a diversified ship builder headquartered in Panama City, Florida, made the donation to the National Coast Guard Museum Association, which is currently engaged in a nationwide fundraising campaign to build a museum to honor the men and women of the U.S. Coast guard. The Coast Guard is currently the only branch of the U.S. military without a dedicated museum.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Oct. 28

1919-Congress passed the National Prohibition Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the Volstead Act, on this date. The Volstead Act authorized the enforcement of the 18th Amendment, ratified on 29 January 1919. The Act authorized the Coast Guard to prevent the maritime importation of illegal alcohol. This led to the largest increase in the size and responsibilities of the service to that date. 1943-Choiseul, Treasury Islands landing (Coast Guard-manned LST-71 was in second echelon November 1, 1943). 1991-Thousands of Haitian migrants began fleeing their homeland after the overthrow of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, prompting one of the largest SAR operations in Coast Guard history. Cutters and aircraft from as far north as New England converged on the Windward Passage.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – October 28

1919-Congress passed the National Prohibition Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the Volstead Act, on this date. The Volstead Act authorized the enforcement of the 18th Amendment, ratified on 29 January 1919. The Act authorized the Coast Guard to prevent the maritime importation of illegal alcohol. This led to the largest increase in the size and responsibilities of the service to that date. 1943-Choiseul, Treasury Islands landing (Coast Guard-manned LST-71 was in second echelon November 1, 1943). 1991-Thousands of Haitian migrants began fleeing their homeland after the overthrow of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, prompting one of the largest SAR operations in Coast Guard history. Cutters and aircraft from as far north as New England converged on the Windward Passage.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Oct. 1

1926-An airways division, headed by a chief engineer, was set up as a part of the Lighthouse Service, its work covering the examination of airways and emergency landing fields and the erection and maintenance of aids to air navigation. 1943-Coast Guard-manned USS LST-203 was stranded in Southwest Pacific but there were no casualties. 1976- Coast Guard personnel were required to change to the new "Bender Blues" uniforms by this date. 1991- The CGC Storis became the oldest commissioned cutter in the Coast Guard when the CGC Fir was decommissioned. The Storis's crew painted her hull number "38" in gold in recognition of her status. 1996- Operation Frontier Shield commenced. It was the largest counter-narcotics operation in Coast Guard history to date.

Michelle Obama Christens ShipConstructor-Designed Vessel

Image courtesy ShipConstructor

On Friday, July 23, First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama christened the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a vessel that was detail designed and production engineered by Northrop Grumman using ShipConstructor CAD/CAM software. Stratton is the first Coast Guard patrol cutter to be named after a woman in more than 20 years. The ship is named in honor of Dorothy Constance Stratton, the first female commissioned officer in Coast Guard history. Stratton served as the director of the SPARS, the Women’s Reserve during World War II.

This Day in Coast Guard History – October 1

1926-An airways division, headed by a chief engineer, was set up as a part of the Lighthouse Service, its work covering the examination of airways and emergency landing fields and the erection and maintenance of aids to air navigation. 1943-Coast Guard-manned USS LST-203 was stranded in Southwest Pacific but there were no casualties. 1976- Coast Guard personnel were required to change to the new "Bender Blues" uniforms by this date. 1991- The CGC Storis became the oldest commissioned cutter in the Coast Guard when the CGC Fir was decommissioned. The Storis's crew painted her hull number "38" in gold in recognition of her status. 1996- Operation Frontier Shield commenced. It was the largest counter-narcotics operation in Coast Guard history to date.

This Day in Coast Guard History – October 6

1938- The first members were enrolled in the Coast Guard Reserve. 1943- Patrol Squadron 6 (VP-6 CG) was officially established.  This was an all Coast Guard unit.  Its home base was at Narsarssuak, Greenland, code name Bluie West-One.  It had nine PBY-5As assigned.  CDR Donald B. MacDiarmid, USCG, was the first commanding officer.  As additional PBYs became available, the units area of operation expanded and detachments were established in Argentia, Newfoundland and Reykjavik, Iceland, furnishing air cover for US Navy and Coast Guard vessels.   Hundreds of rescue operations were carried out during the 27 months the squadron was in operation. (Source: Coast Guard History)

This Day in Coast Guard History – May 13

1905- An Executive Order extended the jurisdiction of the Lighthouse Service to the noncontiguous territory of Guam Island. 1952- The Coast Guard announced the establishment of an Organized Reserve Training Program, the first in U.S. Coast Guard history. Morton G. Lessans was sworn in as the first member of the Organized Air Reserve on 12 December 1951. 1986-CGC Manitou stopped  the 125-foot Sun Bird in 7th District waters and her boarding team discovered 40,000 pounds of marijuana hidden aboard. The boarding team then located the vessel's builder's plate and learned that the Sun Bird was the decommissioned "buck-and-a-quarter" cutter Crawford. The former cutter and her 14-man crew were taken into custody.

This Day in Coast Guard History – August 25

1945-CGC Magnolia was rammed amidships on 25 August 1945 by the cargo ship SS Marguerite Lehand off Mobile Bay. She sank in two minutes and one of her crew was killed. The other 49 were rescued. Those survivors cross-decked to the new tender CGC Salvia (WAGL-400) which then took Magnolia's place. 1950-SS Benevolence collided with SS Mary Luckenbach. CGC Gresham and other vessels responded and rescued 407 persons. 1971-The Secretary of Transportation announced the awarding of a contract to the Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company of Seattle, Washington, "to build the world’s most powerful icebreaker for the US Coast Guard," Polar Star, the first of two "Polar-Class" icebreakers.

USCG Dedicates Final 41-foot Utility Boat

The last operational Coast Guard 41-foot patrol boat rests at the Door County Maritime Museum in Sturgeon Bay, Wisc. (USCG photo by Tom Morrell)

U.S. Representatives from U.S. Coast Guard, the city of Sturgeon Bay and the Door County Maritime Museum dedicated the Coast Guard’s last operational 41-foot utility boat, Tuesday, during the Sturgeon Bay Maritime Festival. The dedication ceremony, held at the Door County Maritime Museum, was attended by Thad Birmingham, mayor of Sturgeon Bay; Capt. Amy Cocanour, commander of Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan, and Capt. John Little, chief of staff of the Ninth Coast Guard District, as well as numerous local Coast Guard units.

Coast Guard Foundation Tribute Honors Heroes

20th Annual Dinner to be Held in New Orleans on March 1st, 2013. The Coast Guard Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to the education and welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that its 20th Annual Tribute to the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Eighth District will take place on Friday, March 1, 2013 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Coast Guard Foundation’s New Orleans awards dinner is a festive celebration of the men and women serving in the U.S. Coast Guard's 8th District, which includes the Gulf Coast as well as the inland waterways of the country.

Fourth National Security Cutter Delivered to USCG

Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton will be the first National Security Cutter to be based on the East Coast and will be joined by Coast Guard Cutter James, currently in production, next year at their new homeport in Charleston, So

The Coast Guard accepted delivery of the fourth National Security Cutter, Hamilton, in Pascagoula, Mississippi, Monday. Hamilton will be the first of two NSCs to be homeported in Charleston, South Carolina. The cutter will be commissioned into service Dec. “After three years of fabrication and expert craftsmanship, Ingalls shipyard has delivered a great ship to the Coast Guard,” said Capt. Douglas Fears, the prospective commanding officer of Hamilton. The cutter is now officially an asset of the Coast Guard and custody is turned over from the shipyard to its commanding officer and crew.

This Day in Coast Guard History - Jan. 15

1836- A General Order from the Secretary of the Treasury prescribed that "Blue cloth be substituted for the uniform dress of the officers of the Revenue Cutter Service, instead of grey. . ." thereby ending a controversy that ad brewed for years regarding the uniforms of the Service. 1947- The first helicopter flight to the base "Little America" in Antarctica took place. The pilot was LT James A. Cornish, USCG and he carried Chief Photographer's Mate Everett Mashburn as his observer. They flew from the CGC Northwind. 1966- When winds of 30 to 50 knots hit the southern California coast, surface craft off the 11th Coast Guard District rendered assistance to six grounded vessels, three disabled sailboats, and three capsized vessels. They also responded to seven other distress cases. A U.S.

Fairbanks Morse to Power USCG’s Offshore Patrol Cutters

Image: Vard

When the U.S. Coast Guard’s first new Offshore Patrol Cutters (OPC) is put to sea in 2021, it will be powered by diesel propulsion engines manufactured in Beloit, Wis., by Fairbanks Morse. The OPC will “provide a critical capability bridge” between the National Security Cutter which patrols the open ocean, and the Fast Response Cutter which serves closer to shore, according to the Coast Guard. The cutters operate independently or in task groups to conduct search and rescue, law enforcement, homeland security and defense missions.

Ostermiller President, Nat’l CG Museum

The Coast Guard Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to the education, welfare and morale of all Coast Guard members and their families, and a partner of the National Coast Guard Museum Association, announced the appointment of Jerry Ostermiller as the president of the National Coast Guard Museum. An accomplished museum administrator with over 25 years experience, Mr. Ostermiller will establish museum programming, develop internal infrastructure and lead capital campaign fund raising efforts for the construction of the country's newest national museum in New London, Connecticut. The United States Coast Guard is the only military service that does not currently have a national museum, which recounts the institution's history, service and missions. Mr.

US Coast Guard Busts Drug-Laden Submarine-like Vessel

Photo: US Coast Guard

The U.S. Coast Guard based in Northern California seized a semi-submersible vessel carrying more than 16,000 pounds of cocaine in the Eastern Pacific Ocean last month - the largest bust of its kind in Coast Guard history. The Coast Guard Cutter Stratton intercepted the 40-foot "self-propelled semi-submersible" in the Pacific Ocean 200 miles south of Mexico on July 18 and arrested four alleged smugglers, officials said. The Guard seized 275 bales of cocaine. Chief Warrant Officer Allyson Conroy says that the Alameda, California-based crew also apprehended four suspected smugglers.

US Coastguard Commissions New Fast Response Cutter

Coastguard Cutter 'Webber': Photo credit USCG

The 154-foot Coast Guard Cutter Webber is a Fast Response Cutter and will be able to deploy independently to conduct missions such as ports, waterways, and coastal security, fishery patrols, drug and illegal migrant law enforcement, search and rescue, and national defense operations along the Gulf of Mexico and throughout the Caribbean. The Webber is capable of speeds of 28-plus knots, armed with one stabilized, remotely operated 25mm chain gun and four crew-served .50 caliber machine guns, and crew capabilities to hold 24 people.

USCG Transfers from Transportation to Homeland Security

At a historic ‘Change of Watch’ ceremony at the D.C. Stadium-Armory yesterday, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta transferred leadership of the U.S. Coast Guard to U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge, formally recognizing the change in civilian leadership over a military organization. “This morning is an historic occasion for both the Coast Guard and the Department of Transportation. The explosion of maritime drug traffic, mass movement of illegal migrants, a new sensibility and responsibility for the environment, the threat to our ports -- all of these missions came to maturity during the Coast Guard’s tenure at the Department.

Eastern Hires Adm. Papp as President Washington Ops

Admiral Robert J. Papp, Jr., U.S. Coast Guard (Retired) Photo Eastern Shipbuilding

Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc. has appointed Admiral Robert J. Papp, Jr., U. S. Coast Guard (Retired), as President of Eastern Shipbuilding Group, Inc., Washington Operations. Admiral Papp served as an Officer in the Coast Guard for nearly 40 years, completing his career as the 24th Commandant of the U. S. Coast Guard from 2010 to 2014. The Coast Guard is the largest component of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). He was a career cutterman, serving in six cutters, commanding four of them, including the Coast Guard’s square rigged sailing ship, USCG Barque EAGLE.

Zukunft Lauds Largest Ever Acquisition Budget

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft delivers the 2016 State of the Coast Guard Address (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Patrick Kelley)

U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Paul Zukunft delivered the 2016 State of the Coast Guard Address at U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Congressional Auditorium Tuesday. This was Adm. Zukunft’s second State of the Coast Guard Address and he welcomed the opportunity to recognize Service accomplishments, reinforce his strategic intent and provide direction for the coming year. "Now, on behalf of the 88,000 women and men of the Coast Guard, I profoundly thank the 114th Congress and this Administration for delivering an authorization bill along with the largest acquisition budget in Coast Guard history…

This Day in Coast Guard History – March 17

1863- The cutter Agassiz defended the Union-held Fort Anderson at New Bern, North Carolina, from a Confederate attack. 1902- All but one of the members of the crew of the Monomoy (Massachusetts) Life-Saving Station perished during the attempted rescue of the crew of the wrecked coal barge Wadena during a terrible winter gale. The dead included the keeper of the station, Marshall N. Eldridge, and six of his surfmen. Eldridge told his crew before they departed on the rescue that: "We must go, there is a distress flag in the rigging."  The crew of five from the barge also perished. The sole survivor, Seth L. Ellis, was the number one surfman of the Monomoy station. He was awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal as was the man who rescued him, Captain Elmer Mayo of the barge Fitzpatrick.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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