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Thursday, August 16, 2018

Maritime Professional News

The EPA's Clean Water Act and Understanding VGP

The Vessel General Permit (VGP) falls under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA), better known as the Clean Water Act. It is administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), an agency not well known or understood by the maritime industry.For years, the EPA had adopted a policy of broadly exempting discharges into the water that were incidental to normal operation of vessels. That changed after environmental advocacy groups prevailed in a judicial challenge. The first iteration of the VGP entered into effect in 2008 and remained in effect until replaced by the current iteration in 2013.

MACC is Definitely Back

Joseph Keefe, MarineNews Editor

Even Mother Nature Can’t Dent the Enthusiasm at this Year’s MACC.Curtis Bay, MD: On the morning after the Baltimore, MD area received a record 3.5 inches of torrential rain in just 90 minutes, this year’s Multi-Agency Craft Conference (MACC) kicked off without a hitch at the United States Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay, MD. That may sound easy, but for those flying in Tuesday afternoon (or like myself, driving in through DC at exactly the moment that the George Washington Parkway flooded badly near the DCA Airport)…

St. Louis: the heartland’s intermodal hub hosts two industry events

On the IMX tradeshow floor: Scania USA Sales Manager (Marine) Al Alcala and MarineNews Editor Joseph Keefe this week got together to discuss current trends in propulsion.

The 5th annual inland IMX show coincides with the first ever FreightWeek STL. For transport professionals, supply chain stakeholders and inland operators alike, there was something for everyone. St. Louis, MO: This week’s IMX inland marine industry tradeshow may have been the primary focus for inland stakeholders, but there were many more reasons to be here in St. Louis. Parallel with and coordinating with the 5th annual event was the weeklong FreightWeek STL event intended to spotlight freight and transportation industries, opportunities and to underscore the St.

Finalists of Mersey Maritime Industry Awards Announced

Chris Shirling Rooke Photo Mersey Maritime

The finalists of the 2017 Mersey Maritime Industry Awards (MMIAs) have been announced. The winners will be revealed at a prestigious black tie dinner that will have a Ministerial presence and promises to bring together the best of the maritime industry right across the Maritime, Logistics and Energy spectrum in the region. The MMIAs are organised by sector representative body Mersey Maritime and the Awards recognise the excellence and diversity that exists across all sectors of the maritime industry in the North West.

Salvage and Marine Firefighting Verification

Firefighting onboard any ship is one of the most serious situations facing onboard personnel and responders. The containership CCNI Arauco caught fire in the aft container hold on September 1. After four intense weeks, Ardent safely returned the vessel to the owners. Ardent discharged the damaged containers out of the vessels cargo hold. These containers were declared as dangerous waste and required special treatment. (Photo: Feuerwehr Hamburg)

The U.S. Coast Guard regulations regarding salvage and marine firefighting (SMFF) as elements of vessel response plans (VRPs) for tank vessels have been in place since December 31, 2008. On September 30, 2013, these regulations were expanded to include non-tank vessels with a capacity of 2,500 barrels or greater of fuel oil. The VRP requirement was established by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90). be resubmitted for approval of each significant change. The salvage and marine…

Coral Reefs: A Unique Natural Resource

© vlad61_61 / Adobe Stock

Stony corals are marine invertebrates with somewhat unique life cycles. For the most part, they reproduce sexually, broadcasting gametes into the water. Often, an entire coral colony or reef will spawn on the same night. Coral may also reproduce asexually by producing genetically identical polyps. Fertilized gametes drift in the current until, hopefully, they alight on a hard surface like a rock suitable for attachment. The gamete then develops into a polyp, producing a basal plate that affixes itself to the hard surface.

Cabotage Rules Changes Proposed

Dennis Bryant

On January 18, 2017, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) proposed in its Customs Bulletin & Decisions newsletter a significant change to the U.S. cabotage rules. For many years, use of non-coastwise-qualified vessels in the transportation of pipeline repair material; anodes; pipeline connectors; wellhead equipment, valves and valve guards; damaged pipeline; platform repair material; and similar items from a U.S. point to another point within U.S. waters and/or those on the outer continental shelf has been ruled by CBP (and its predecessor U.S. Customs Service) as consistent with U.S.

Simulation: Maritime Professional Training

(Photo: MPT)

In South Florida sits MPT, one of the most prolific and progressive maritime training facilities. Already fully stocked, MPT added significant weight to its offering in 2016 with investment in 25,000 sq. ft. of new training space and technology. MPT handles more than 12,000 students a year from all segments of the maritime industry and from more than a dozen countries. With that range MPT has students from ship operators, tug companies, passenger vessels, offshore and energy exploration companies…

SUNY Maritime to Train NYC’s Next Ferry Captains

Photo: SUNY Maritime College

NYC Ferry operated by Hornblower is teaming up with the oldest merchant marine academy in the country to deliver a world class training program before a majority of the new NYC Ferry vessels even arrive in New York Harbor. SUNY Maritime College was founded in 1874 as the New York Nautical School, the first school in the nation devoted to training merchant mariners. As part of this new collaboration between NYC Ferry and SUNY Maritime, future captains and crew will have access to SUNY Maritime’s top notch classroom facilities and experienced maritime faculty.

Lines in the Water

Photo: Carlos Rivera / U.S. Customs and Border Patrol

There are a variety of jurisdictional lines in the water. The first line to be considered is the national boundary between two adjacent or nearby countries. Adjacent countries tend to draw agreed boundaries extending their shoreside boundaries, with accommodations for headlands, capes, etc. Most national boundaries have been agreed upon long ago. A few, though, are not officially resolved. Somewhat surprisingly, of the four marine boundaries between Canada and the U.S., three are still in dispute.

Biofouling Keep Out!

© Svetlana Yudina / Adobe Stock

Biofouling was a backburner issue until 5 March 2017. On that day the Government of New Zealand ordered the bulk carrier DL MARIGOLD out of NZ waters after the vessel’s hull was determined to be excessively fouled with potentially invasive organisms including barnacles and tube worms. The bulker was not allowed back until it showed that the underwater surfaces had been thoroughly cleaned. This was the first known instance of a vessel expulsion due to biofouling. It was also significant…

Seawork Panel to Address Brexit Implications

John Haynes

Seawork 2017 is being held at the waterside location Mayflower Park in Southampton, U.K. from June 13-15, 2017. Seawork will be celebrating its 20th anniversary with a packed schedule including the Seawork Conference which will once again be offering thought-provoking sessions covering a wide variety of topics. John Haynes, Maritime Professional of the Year 2016, is running a topical panel discussion titled, ‘Shock Mitigation, International Vibration Directives and the Implications of Brexit’ at 12.15 on Tuesday, June 13.

Melting Sea Ice: A Canary in the Coal Mine

© André Gilden / Adobe Stock

The rapid loss of Arctic sea ice is a sentinel. Most of us will never venture into the Arctic, but it can and does provide us with a forewarning of impacts coming to our parts of the Earth – and some of the most significant impacts will directly affect the maritime industry. In earlier times, coal miners were sometimes overcome by the buildup of odorless carbon monoxide gas. Some died as a consequence. Eventually it was realized that canaries were more susceptible to the gas than were humans.

Salvage and Marine Firefighting

© Lev Savitskiy / Adobe Stock

Salvage and marine firefighting are complex response efforts often undertaken in adverse weather and sea conditions. While no two oil spill responses are the same, the diversity of variation between any two oil spill responses is not near as great as the diversity of any two salvage and marine firefighting responses. As a result, salvage and marine firefighting response providers must plan for and anticipate a wide range of variation in what will be required to address their portion of a marine casualty. The U.S.

RMI Registry Strengthens Support for Japanese Owners

International Registries, Inc. and its affiliates (IRI), which provide administrative and technical support to the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) Maritime and Corporate Registries, has appointed a new Technical Officer in its Imabari office, strengthening its support and services for the Japanese ship owning market. “We now have more than 400 employees in our 27 offices worldwide and by hiring an extremely experienced technical officer in Imabari, who understands every aspect of vessel safety and day-to-day operations, we are upgrading our service commitment to our growing number of Japanese owners and operators,” said Bill Gallagher, President, IRI.

US Navy: Back to Basics

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) is loaded onto the heavy lift transport MV Treasure, Oct. 11, 2017. Treasure will transport John S. McCain to Fleet Activities Yokosuka for repairs. (U.S. Navy photo by Keith Lehnhardt)

The U.S. Navy has a well-deserved reputation for seamanship in trying conditions. Recently though, the Navy has suffered a series of marine casualties, including the fatal collisions involving two destroyers of the Pacific Fleet. On June 17, USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62), an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, was involved in a collision with the container ship ACX Crystal off Japan, resulting in the deaths of seven Navy crewmembers. The destroyer was severely damaged and is being returned to the United States via heavy-lift vessel for extensive repairs. On August 21, USS John S.

W&O Supply Holds a Steady Course

Michael Hume, President & CEO, W&O Supply (Photo: W&O Supply)

Michael Hume, President & CEO, holds top marine distributor W&O Supply on a steady course. W&O has been a distribution leader in the commercial marine space for more than four decades for a number of reasons, but it all starts with stability at the top, in the form of the leadership of Michael Hume, President & Chief Executive Officer. Hume has been with the company since 1992, and on a recent visit to his office in Jacksonville, Fla., he discussed the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for his company.

El Faro and Perceived Deficiencies in the ACP

he Marine Board’s report, which is not final until approved by the Commandant, found no single cause for this tragic event. Rather, as in most such incidents, there were numerous factors that combined in the fatal voyage of El Faro. (Photo: NTSB)

The October 1, 2015 loss of the U.S. cargo vessel El Faro along with its 33 member crew led to the convening of a Coast Guard Marine Board of Investigation charged with determining as closely as possible the cause(s) of the casualty; whether there is evidence that any failure of material was involved; whether there is evidence of misconduct, inattention to duty, negligence, or willful violation of law; and whether there is evidence that government personnel contributed to the casualty. The Marine Board released its report on October 1, 2017, the second anniversary of the casualty.

JAN / FEB Edition of Maritime Logistics Professional magazine

Image Credit: (c) JJAVA

Make sure your Cruise Port is in our Top 20 Feature. The January / February 2018 edition of Maritime Logistics Professional will focus on today’s cruise shipping trends, how cruise lines are achieving a greener cruise shipping signature, and many other aspects the global cruise markets. Additionally, we will also feature the World’s Top 20 Cruise Ports. Simply click the link or go to https://cruiseports.maritimeprofessional.com/ to get started. Enter your port by populating the entry form.

Top 20 Cruise Ports: Apply Now

© PixieMe / Adobe Stock

The January/February 2018 edition of Maritime Logistics Professional will focus on today’s cruise shipping trends, how cruise lines are achieving a greener signature, and many other aspects of the global cruise markets.   Additionally, MLPro will feature the World’s Top 20 Cruise Ports. To enter your port, apply at https://cruiseports.maritimeprofessional.com/. Contact MLPro editor Joseph Keefe with questions at 704.661.8475 or at keefe@marinelink. This edition will also feature bonus distribution at Seatrade Cruise Shipping in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Enter your port now.

Serious Questions Surround BWMS Testing

© Jeremy Francis / Adobe Stock

Serious questions have been raised regarding the testing of ballast water management systems (BWMSs). In order for a BWMS manufacturer to sell its equipment for use on commercial vessels operating in U.S. waters, the equipment must be tested in accordance with U.S. Coast Guard and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements and the equipment must then obtain a type approval certificate from the Coast Guard. To date, type approval certificates have been issued to six manufacturers and others are in the pipeline.

Maritime Simulation: High-tech Meets Practical Skills

Maritime Professional Training (MPT) has just finished a $6m renovation and expansion project with new technology, upgrades in simulation, a new waterside lifeboat training facility, and a recently expanded Main Campus. (Photo: MPT)

When talk turns to ‘Maritime Simulation’ visions of high-tech bridge simulators with seamless graphics and interwoven component simulators – engine room, DP systems, cargo loading – come to mind. But modern simulation is so much more, a wholistic visual, audio, tactile and cereberal experience that prepares mariners to deal with a bevy of real-world situations. Modern maritime simulation has evolved rapidly, driven by exponential leaps in computer and graphic display power, a…

MarTID: The Global Survey of Maritime Training Practices Debuts

The inaugural edition of the MarTID Maritime Training Insights Database (MarTID) Report sheds new light on maritime safety and training practices, what works, and what doesn’t. More importantly, its analysis and data emanates from you. The first annual Maritime Training Insights Database (MarTID) Report initiative has been two years in the making. This initiative was developed with the intent of being a shared commitment to safe, efficient and sustainable operations in the maritime industry.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Aug 2018 - The Shipyard Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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