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Monday, June 25, 2018

National Hurricane Center News

Cindy to Weaken this Morning - NHC

Tropical storm Cindy is expected to weaken while moving farther inland and become a tropical depression later Thursday morning, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in its latest advisory.   "Continued weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours, and Cindy should weaken to a tropical depression later this morning, and become a remnant low tonight," the Miami-based weather forecaster said.   Cindy, now located about 40 miles (65 km) northwest of Lake Charles, Louisiana with maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour (65 km/h), will likely move into southeastern Arkansas early Friday, and into Tennessee later that day.   Reporting by Vijaykumar Vedala and Apeksha Nair

Hurricane Dora Forms Off Mexico's Pacific Coast

Image: U.S. National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Dora formed off the western coast of Mexico in the Pacific Ocean on Monday, but it was expected to slow and remain offshore, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said. Dora, the first hurricane to form in the Pacific so far this year, was carrying maximum sustained winds of about 80 miles per hour (130 km per hour) as it whirled about 170 miles (275 km) south-southwest of the port of Manzanillo, the center said. Dora was slowing and was likely to see some strengthening on Monday before weakening on Tuesday, the NHC said.

Hurricane Franklin Makes Landfall in Veracruz, Mexico

Hurricane Franklin made landfall on the eastern coast of Mexico in the state of Veracruz, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said early Thursday.   Franklin, a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale, is located about 70 miles (115 km) north-northwest of Veracruz with maximum sustained winds of 85 miles per hour (140 kmh), the NHC said.   The hurricane is expected to weaken rapidly as it moves farther inland during the next several hours, the Miami-based weather forecaster said.   Reporting by Apeksha Nair

Harvey Likely to Linger off Texas Coast

The center of Tropical Storm Harvey is likely to remain just off the coast of Texas through Tuesday night before moving inland over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.   The storm is not expected to further intensify before its center crosses the coast again within 36 hours or so, the NHC said.   Harvey is now located about 135 miles (220 km) south-southwest of Port Arthur, Texas with maximum sustained winds of 45 miles per hour (75 km per hour), it added.   Reporting by Arpan Varghese

Harvey Soaks Louisiana as Houston Struggles With Flooding

Tropical Storm Harvey bore down on Louisiana on Wednesday, pouring down more water after setting rainfall records in Texas that caused catastrophic flooding and paralyzed the U.S. energy hub of Houston. The storm that first came ashore on Friday as the most powerful hurricane to hit Texas in more than 50 years has killed at least 17 people and forced tens of thousands to leave their deluged homes. Damage has been estimated at tens of billions of dollars, making it one of the costliest U.S. natural disasters. There is some relief in sight for Houston, the fourth most populous U.S. city, with forecasters saying five days of torrential rain may come to an end as the storm picks up speed and leaves the Gulf of Mexico region later in the day.

Irma Strengthens to a Category 5 Hurricane

Irma on Tuesday intensified into an extremely dangerous Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in its latest advisory.   Hurricane Irma is about 270 miles (440 km) east of Antigua and packing maximum sustained winds of 175 mph (280 km/h), the Miami-based weather forecaster said.   Irma, which is forecast to remain a powerful category 4 or 5 hurricane during the next couple of days, will move near or over portions of the northern Leeward Islands Tuesday night and early Wednesday, the NHC said.   Reporting by Swati Verma

Irma to Weaken by Tuesday Afternoon: NHC

Hurricane Irma was losing strength as its center moved toward the northwestern coast of the Florida Peninsula on Monday and was forecast to weaken to a tropical storm during the day and to a tropical depression by Tuesday afternoon, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.   Irma, once ranked as one of the most powerful hurricanes recorded in the Atlantic, was about 60 miles (100 km) north of Tampa, Florida, carrying maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour (120 km per hour), the center said in a 5 a.m. ET (0900 GMT) advisory.   Irma's center would cross the eastern Florida Panhandle into southern Georgia on Monday afternoon, then move through southwestern Georgia and eastern Alabama on Monday evening and Tuesday, the NHC forecast.   Reporting by Vijaykumar Vedala

Hurricane Maria Regains Category 5 Strength

Hurricane Maria has intensified and regained its Category 5 hurricane strength, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Tuesday.   Maria, which made landfall in Dominica as a Category 5 storm on Monday night, is about 205 miles (325 km) southeast of St. Croix with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph (260 km/h), it said.   The hurricane is expected to move towards the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico on Tuesday night and Wednesday, the Miami-based weather forecaster added. Reporting by Vijaykumar Vedala

Weakened Maria Could Regain Major Hurricane Status -NHC

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite VIIRS instrument captured this thermal image on Sept. 20, 2017, at 2:12 a.m. EDT (0612 UTC). At the time, Maria’s eye was just east of the American Virgin Islands, and its northwestern quadrant stretched over Puerto Rico. (Credit: NASA Goddard Rapid Response Team)

Maria, which weakened into a Category 2 hurricane on Wednesday, could regain major hurricane status by Thursday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said in its latest advisory. Catastrophic flash flooding was occurring over portions of Puerto Rico with conditions now deteriorating over the eastern Dominican Republic, the NHC said. The hurricane was about 25 miles (45 km) north northwest of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico with maximum sustained winds of 110 miles per hour (175 km per hour), the Miami-based NHC said. Any hurricane with top sustained winds of at least 111 is classified as major.

Nate Becomes a Post-Tropical Cyclone: NHC

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) mode_list)

Former hurricane Nate has become a post-tropical cyclone that continues to pack heavy rain and gusty winds, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Monday.   The storm system is about 85 miles (135 km) northeast of Columbus, Ohio with maximum sustained winds of 20 mph (55 km/h), it said.   Nate was expected to continue tracking northeastward, moving through the Ohio Valley and into the lower great lakes on Monday.   Reporting by Vijaykumar Vedala

U.S. Insured Losses from Hurricane Nate around $500 mln

Insured losses in the United States from Hurricane Nate will be close to $500 million, catastrophe modelling company Karen Clark & Company (KCC) said on Monday. The U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Monday that the former hurricane has become a post-tropical cyclone that continues to pack heavy rain and gusty winds. Hurricane Nate caused flooding in Mississippi, but spared the state from catastrophic damages. On Monday, it was expected to continue tracking northeastward, moving through the Ohio Valley and into the lower great lakes. KCC said the estimates included insured wind and storm surge losses to residential, commercial, and industrial properties and autos.

Tropical Depression 17 Forms over Eastern Atlantic: NHC

Tropical Depression 17 has formed over the Eastern Atlantic and is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm later on Monday, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said.   The system is about 875 miles (1,405 km) west-southwest of the Azores with maximum sustained winds of 35 miles per hour (55 km/h), the NHC said.   Reporting by Vijaykumar Vedala

Tropical Storm Javier Forms off of Mexico's Pacific Coast

Image: NOAA

Tropical Storm Javier formed off of Mexico's Pacific coast on Sunday, unleashing intense winds amid expectations it will churn north toward Baja California and the beach resort of Los Cabos, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said. Javier was producing maximum sustained winds of 45 miles per hour (72 km per hour), and was located some 110 miles (177 km) west of the port of Manzanillo. "The center of (Javier) should pass offshore of the southwest coast of Mexico today, and approach the southern portion of the Baja California peninsula on Monday…

Javier Swirls Toward Mexico, no Hurricane Seen

Tropical Storm Javier lost a little strength on Monday evening as it traveled towards the southern part of Mexico's Baja California peninsula, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said. The storm was moving northwest at 5 mph (8 kph) and had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph (97 kph), the NHC said. "A weakening trend is forecast to begin by Tuesday afternoon," it said, adding that Javier was about 30 miles (48 km) south-southeast of Cabo San Lucas, a popular getaway for U.S. visitors on the peninsula. The NHC had earlier reported that the Mexican government discontinued a hurricane warning for Baja California, after the storm failed to pick up strength on its path northward.

Julia Achieves Tropical Storm Status Again

Julia regained its designation as a tropical storm as it milled off the southeast coast of the United States on Friday, the National Hurricane Center said in an advisory. The center of the storm, which drenched parts of northeast Florida, Georgia and South Carolina earlier this week, was not threatening land as it moved east-southeast about 270 miles (435 km) southwest of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, the Miama-based center said. Tropical Storm Julia, carrying winds of 40 mph (65 kph) with higher gusts, was expected to cause rip currents and hazardous wave conditions along the southeastern coast through the weekend, the center said. Reporting by Brendan O'Brien

Hurricane Paine forms off Mexico

Hurricane Paine formed in the Pacific more than 300 miles off the coast of Mexico early on Monday and is forecast to begin weakening later in the day, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said. Mexico has no coastal warnings in effect for Paine, which is expected to weaken substantially before it hits the upper portion of the Baja California peninsula by early Thursday, the Miami-based center said. At 0900 GMT, Paine was 340 miles (547 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, blowing maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour (121 kilometers per hour) and moving northwest at 15 mph (24 kph), the NHC said. According to the NHC forecasts, the storm will gradually arc toward land over the next day or two, and be a tropical depression by the time it reaches the coast.

Matthew Strengthens to a Major Hurricane

Image: U.S. National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Matthew has strengthened into a Category 4, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Friday adding that a Hurricane Watch has been issued for Jamaica.   Matthew was located about 465 miles (750 kilometers) southeast of Kingston Jamaica with maximum sustained winds of 140 miles per hour (220 km/h), the Miami-based weather forecaster said.   Some additional strengthening is possible tonight, and some fluctuations in intensity are possible Saturday and Sunday, the NHC said.     (Reporting by Nithin Prasad in Bengaluru; editing by Diane Craft)

Hurricane Matthew weakens slightly as heads for Jamaica and Cuba

Image U.S. National Hurricane Cente

Hurricane Matthew weakened slightly on Saturday as it moved towards Jamaica and Cuba, although with winds of up to 155 miles per hour (250 kph) it is powerful enough to wreck houses, forecasters said. The strongest hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean since Felix in 2007 was forecast to make landfall as a major storm on Monday on Jamaica's southern coast, home to the capital and Jamaica's only oil refinery. It could affect the island's main tourist areas such as Montego Bay in the north. With Matthew about 420 miles (675 km) southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, the U.S.

Evacuations in Guantanamo, Haiti as fierce Hurricane Matthew looms

Image U.S. National Hurricane Cente

The United States prepared to airlift hundreds of people from its Guantanamo Bay naval base as the most powerful cyclone to form over the Atlantic since Hurricane Felix in 2007 ground slowly towards Jamaica, Haiti and Cuba. Haiti also began evacuating residents by boat from outlying islands in preparation for Hurricane Matthew, which threatens to wreak widespread damage in the region with flash floods and winds at about 150 miles per hour (240 kph). Matthew is expected to make landfall as a major storm on Jamaica's southern coast, home to the capital, Kingston, and its only oil refinery.

Millions Flee as Southeast U.S. Braces for Matthew

Intensifying storm slams into Bahamas; landfall expected in Florida late on Thursday. Hurricane Matthew, the fiercest Caribbean storm in nearly a decade, slammed into the Bahamas early on Thursday and intensified as it barreled toward the southeastern U.S. coast where millions of residents heeded warnings to flee inland. Roadways in Florida, Georgia and North and South Carolina were jammed and gas stations and food stores ran out of supplies as the storm approached, bringing storm surges, heavy rain and sustained winds that accelerated overnight to about 125 miles (205 km) per hour. Matthew, which killed at least 39 people and displaced thousands, mostly in southern Haiti, was predicted to strengthen from a Category 3 to 4 storm en route to Florida's Atlantic coast.

Commercial Ports along Florida's West Coast Reopened

The U.S. Coast Guard said it had reopened all commercial ports along Florida's west coast on Friday, while hurricane Matthew continued to lash the northeast coast of the state.   Matthew was located about 60 miles (95 kilometers) southeast of Jacksonville Beach in Florida with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph (185 km/h), according to the latest advisory from the National Hurricane Center.   The hurricane was forecast to move near or over the coast of northeast Florida and Georgia through Friday night, and near or over the coast of South Carolina on Saturday. It is expected to remain a hurricane until it begins to move away from the United States on Sunday, the NHC said.     (Reporting by Vijaykumar Vedala; Editing by Phil Berlowitz)

Tropical Storm Otto forms over Atlantic

Image: National Hurricane Center

Tropical depression 16 has strengthened into Tropical Storm Otto east of Nicaragua over the Atlantic, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Monday.   The storm, with maximum sustained winds of 50 miles per hour (85 km/h), is located about 305 miles (495 km) east of Bluefields, Nicaragua, the Miami-based weather forecaster said.   Additional strengthening is forecast for the next 48 hours, and Otto could become a hurricane during the next couple of days, the NHC added. (Reporting by Harshith Aranya in Bengaluru)

Otto Strengthens into Hurricane, Headed for Central America

Image: National Hurricane Center

Otto, the seventh hurricane of the 2016 Atlantic season, has formed and is located about 305 miles (485 km) east-southeast of Bluefields, Nicaragua, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Tuesday. The system, packing maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour (120 km/hour), is expected to approach the coasts of Costa Rica and Nicaragua on Thursday on the forecasted track, the NHC added. Additional strengthening is expected for the next few days until landfall, the Miami-based weather forecasting agency said.

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