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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Navy Accepts News

Navy Accepts Delivery of Mesa Verde LPD 19

The Navy accepted delivery of Mesa Verde (LPD 19) from Northrop Grumman Ship Systems on Sept. 28. This marked the third of the San Antonio class of amphibious transport dock ships that the NGSS has delivered. Accepting for the Navy during a simple ceremony aboard the ship was Capt. Beth Dexter, the supervisor of shipbuilding representative for the Gulf Coast. On Oct. 1, the crew moved aboard the 684 foot-long warship. For the first time, Mesa Verde Sailors and Marines assumed their regular duties, such as standing watches, preparing meals for the crew and training. Over the next two months, as Northrop Grumman Ingalls Operations puts the finishing touches on the ship, the crew will be participating in various inspections and certifications including a Light-Off Assessment.

This Day in Naval History – April 7

1776 - Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward 1917 - Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the U.S. 1942 - Navy accepts African Americans for general service 1945 - First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima): ENS Jane Kendeigh, USNR, and LTJG Ann Purvis, USN 1945 - Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea); Yamato, world's largest battleship, and five other ships sunk 1979 - Launching of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, CT (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in U.S. Naval History - April 7

1776 - Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward   1917 - Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the U.S.   1942 - Navy accepts African Americans for general service   1945 - First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima): ENS Jane Kendeigh, USNR, and LTJG Ann Purvis, USN   1945 - Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea); Yamato, world's largest battleship, and five other ships sunk   1979 - Launching of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, CT   (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History – April 7

1776 - Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward 1917 - Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the U.S. 1942 - Navy accepts African Americans for general service 1945 - First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima): ENS Jane Kendeigh, USNR, and LTJG Ann Purvis, USN 1945 - Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea); Yamato, world's largest battleship, and five other ships sunk 1979 - Launching of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, CT (Source: Navy News Service)

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 7

USS Ohio (SSBN-726). U.S. Navy photo

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 7 1776 - Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward 1917 - Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the U.S. 1942 - Navy accepts African Americans for general service 1945 - Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea); Yamato, world's largest battleship, and five other ships sunk 1979 - Launching of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

This Day in Naval History – Oct. 16

1885 - CAPT Alfred Thayer Mahan, USN, becomes Superintendent of the Naval War College 1891 - Baltimore Incident, Valparaiso, Chile. 1940 - 5th group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases Deal turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 - Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) conduct attacks on Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 - Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Connecticut. (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History - Oct. 16

1885 - Navy Capt. Alfred Thayer Mahan becomes superintendent of the Naval War College. 1891 - A brawl between American Sailors and Chilean nationals outside the True Blue Saloon in Valparaiso, Chile, resulted in two American Sailors killed, 17 wounded (five seriously) and many arrested. The incident sparked a diplomatic crisis that lasted for months, occasionally threatening war between the two countries, until a settlement was reached. 1940 - Fifth group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases Deal are turned over to the British in Halifax, Canada. 1942 - Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV 8) conduct attacks on Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 - The Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1), at Bridgeport, Conn.

French Navy Accepts Fast ALC Warship

The French Directorate General of Armaments (DGA) has received the third of four fast amphibious landing craft Engin de Débarquement Amphibie Rapide (EDA-Rs) at Toulon, France. The French Navy's Mistral-class Bâtiments de Projection et de Commandement (BPC) amphibious warfare ships will operate the EDA-R. The 30m-long and 12m-wide catamaran landing craft vessel can carry a payload of 80t and will provide five times the landing capacity of the French Navy's current landing craft. The EDA-R, when fully loaded, can cruise at a speed of 18 kts and will be used for landing military vehicles and troops from ships further offshore and for humanitarian missions.

Today in U.S. Naval History: October 16

Capt. Alfred Thayer Mahan. Artist: H. Peterson after Alexander James. (Photo: U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command)

Today in U.S. 1885 - Capt. 1891 - Baltimore Incident, Valparaiso, Chile. 1940 - Fifth group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases Deal turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 - Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) conduct attacks on Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 - Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Connecticut. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 11

USS Holland (Photo: U.S. National Archives and Records Administration)

Today in U.S. 1970 - Launch of Apollo 13, commanded by Capt. James A. Lovell, Jr., USN. Former naval aviator Fred W. Haise, Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explosion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was five days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 - U.N. For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.

This Day in Naval History - April 11

From the Navy News Service 1783 - Congress declares the end of war with . 1900 - The Navy accepted its first submarine, USS Holland (SS 1). 1970 - Launch of Apollo 13, commanded by Capt. James A. Lovell Jr. Former naval aviator Fred W. Haise Jr. was the lunar module pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth, there was an explosion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. duration was 5 days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 4 from USS Iwo Jima (LPH 2). 1991 - A U.N. ceasefire ends the Persian Gulf War.

This Day in U.S. Naval History - April 11

1783 - Congress declares end of war with Great Britain   1900 - Navy accepted its first submarine, USS Holland   1970 - Launch of Apollo 13, commanded by CAPT James A. Lovell, Jr., USN. Former naval aviator Fred W. Haise, Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explosion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours, and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2).   1991 - U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War   (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in Naval History - April 11

From the Navy News Service 1783 - Congress declares the end of war with Great Britain. 1900 - The Navy accepted its first submarine, USS Holland (SS 1). 1970 - Launch of Apollo 13, commanded by Capt. James A. Lovell Jr. Former naval aviator Fred W. Haise Jr. was the lunar module pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth, there was an explosion on board which forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours and 54 minutes. Recovery was by Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 4 from USS Iwo Jima (LPH 2). 1991 - A U.N. ceasefire ends the Persian Gulf War.

Several Milestones on US Navy, Coast Guard Builds

Photo: Lance Davis / HII

GE’s Marine Solutions noted that several milestones were recently marked on U.S. Navy and Coast Guard surface combatant programs that all use GE’s LM2500 aeroderivative marine gas turbines. On December 23, 2016, the U.S. Navy accepted delivery of the fifth Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), the future USS Gabrielle Giffords. GE will provide 20 LM2500 gas turbines for the Austal USA LCS program, part of a contract for up to 10 ships to be built by Austal USA. The two LM2500s are arranged in a Combined Diesel And Gas turbine (CODAG) configuration with two diesel engines.

Navy Accepts Delivery of Green Bay (LPD 20)

The Navy accepted delivery of (LPD 20) from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding (NGSB) in , Aug. 29. This is the fourth ship of the class of amphibious transport dock ships that NGSB has delivered. Accepting for the Navy during a simple onboard ceremony was Capt. Beth Dexter, Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, and ’s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Joe Olson. Following the delivery ceremony, the crew of boarded their ship. The ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Rose Magnus, and her husband, retired Marine Corps Gen. Robert Magnus, joined the crew for their first onboard meal in the “Lambeau Lounge.”  With the move aboard the ship, the crew started their regular duties of standing watches, preparing meals, training and conducting post delivery testing.

Navy Takes Delivery of New Orleans LPD 18

The Navy accepted delivery of the second in the LPD 17 class of amphibious transport dock ship on Dec. 22. The acceptance of the future USS New Orleans, marks the culmination of millions of hours in conceptual planning, design, construction, and testing of this advanced amphibious warship. New Orleans recently completed Builder's and Acceptance Trials during which the shipbuilder, Northrop Grumman Ship Systems, successfully demonstrated this new warship's tremendous range of capability. Main propulsion, engineering and ship control systems, mission and combat systems, damage control, food service and crew support systems were exercised.

Future USS Washington Delivered

 USS Washington. Photo: United States Navy

The Navy accepted delivery of the future USS Washington (SSN 787), the 14th submarine of the Virginia-class, May 26. Washington is the fourth of eight Virginia-class Block III submarines and the seventh of the class to be delivered to the Navy by Huntington Ingalls Industries - Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Virginia. Washington began construction in September 2011 and will be commissioned later this year in Norfolk, Virginia. The submarine's sponsor is Elisabeth Mabus, daughter of the 75th Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus.

Hull Inspection Systems Delivered to the US Navy

EOD HULS MK19 Systems 4 and 5 vehicles (Photo courtesy of Bluefin Robotics)

Bluefin Robotics has delivered new vehicles to the U.S. Navy that aim to increase the Navy's capability to remotely search and investigate ship hulls, harbor sea floors and other underwater infrastructure for limpet mines, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) and other objects of interest. The Navy accepted delivery of Bluefin Robotics’ ship hull inspection systems 4 and 5 under the “Explosive Ordnance Disposal, Hull Unmanned Underwater Vehicle Localization System” (EOD HULS) Program of Record, in February.

Navy Accepts Delivery of USS Gabrielle Giffords

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Gabby Giffords waves to a crowd in front of the littoral combat ship, USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), named for her. Giffords was on the stage as Dr. Jill Biden christened the ship at Austal USA in Mobile, Ala. The 419-foot ship was built at the Austal shipyard and is the Navy's 10th littoral combat ship designed to operate in shallow waters near the coast. It is 16th U.S. naval ship to be named for a woman and only the 13th since 1850 to be named for a living person.

The Navy accepted delivery of the future USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10) during a ceremony, Dec. 23. Gabrielle Giffords is the ninth littoral combat ship (LCS) to be delivered to the Navy and the fifth of the Independence variant to join the fleet. The Independence variant is noted for its unique trimaran hull, ability to operate at high speeds and large flight deck size. "We are pleased to receive the future USS Gabrielle Giffords into the LCS class," said Capt. Harrison, commander, LCS Squadron (COMLCSRON) 1.

This Day in Navy History

1918 - Naval Aviators of Marine Day Squadron 9 make first raid-in-force for the Northern Bombing Group in World War I when they bombed German railroad at Thielt Rivy, Belgium. 1917 - USS Cassin (DD-43) torpedoed by German submarine U-61 off coast of Ireland. In trying to save the ship, Gunner's Mate Osmond Kelly Ingram becomes first American sailor killed in World War I and later is awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism. He becomes the first enlisted man to have a ship named for him, in 1919. 1948 - First women officers on active duty sworn in as commissioned officers in regular Navy under Women's Service Integration Act of June 1948 by Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan: CAPT Joy B. Hancock, USN; LCDR Winifred R. Quick, USN; LCDR Anne King, USN; LCDR Frances L.

BAE Systems Supports Thai Navy Patrol Boat Build

Danela McFadyen, Head of Commercial, International with Captain Pichayane Tanprasert, Managing Director of Bangkok Dock (Photo: BAE Systems)

BAE Systems announced it has signed a contract with Bangkok Dock to assist in the licensed construction of a second 90-meter Offshore Patrol Vessel for the Royal Thai Navy. Under the agreement, BAE Systems will provide engineering support and advice during construction of the vessel in Thailand. Nigel Stewart, Commercial Director, BAE Systems’ Naval Ships business, said, “We’re looking forward to building and strengthening our relationship with Thailand’s shipbuilding industry.

Navy Accepts Delivery of Destroyer Stockdale

The Navy accepted delivery of the guided-missile destroyer Stockdale from General Dynamics Bath Iron Works during a ceremony in on Sept. 30. Designated DDG 106, the new destroyer honors Medal of Honor recipient Vice Adm. James Bond Stockdale (1923-2005), the legendary leader of American prisoners of war (POWs) during the Vietnam War. Stockdale is the 56th Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. The ship will be able to conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection. Stockdale will be capable of fighting air, surface and subsurface battles simultaneously and contains a myriad of offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime warfare.

Northrop Grumman Delivers William P. Lawrence (DDG 110)

ith U.S. Navy Capt. Bill Galinis, supervisor of shipbuilding, Gulf Coast, far left and U.S. Navy Cmdr. Thomas R. Williams, DDG 110's prospective commanding officer, center, observing, George Nungesser, Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding program manager for the DDG 51 program, signs the DD250 form officially transferring custody of William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) from Northrop Grumman to the Navy. Photo courtesy Northrop Grumman.

On Feb. 24, the U.S. Navy accepted Northrop Grumman Corporation's (NYSE:NOC) latest Aegis guided missile destroyer in a ceremony held on the fantail of the Navy's newest ship. William P. Lawrence (DDG 110) is the 28th DDG 51 Class destroyer built at the company's shipbuilding operations in Pascagoula. "We are here today celebrating the culmination of 175 weeks of hard work and dedication from thousands of shipbuilders, teammates and shipmates," said George Nungesser, program manager of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding's DDG 51 program. "This ship went to sea as the most complete DDG to-date.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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