Marine Link
Thursday, June 21, 2018

Ohio River News

Indiana Ports set Quarterly Tonnage Record

The port of Indiana, Jeffersonville (Photo: Ports of Indiana)

The Ports of Indiana handled nearly 3.9 million tons of cargo during the fourth quarter of 2016, the highest quarterly shipment total in the organization's 55-year history. The total surpassed the ports' previous quarterly record set in the second quarter of 2015 by 300,000 tons. The state's three ports' shipped nearly 11.3 million tons in 2016, the second highest volume in history and the third consecutive year the ports exceeded 10 million tons annually. Since 2014, the Ports of Indiana has handled 34 million tons of cargo, the highest three-year total since Indiana's ports opened.

USCG Investigates Alcohol Leak on Ohio River Barge

The Coast Guard is responding to a report of an isopropyl alcohol leak from a barge in the Ohio River, Feb. 21. At about 5:30 a.m., the captain of the tug vessel Bridget Cauley notified watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Ohio Valley that alcohol was reportedly leaking from the top portion of a barge that the Bridget Cauley was pushing, spilling an unknown amount on to the deck of the barge, while transiting the river approximately five miles south of Cincinnati. A pollution investigation team from Coast Guard Marine Safety Detachment Cincinnati was dispatched to the scene. A temporary patch placed over the hole was effective in securing the leak; however, the Bridget Cauley remains under a Captain of the Port order until a final repair is made.

Barge Breakaway on Ohio River

The U.S. Coast Guard is responding to a report of a barge breakaway at the Racine Lock and Dam on the Ohio River near Huntington, W.Va., Thursday. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Ohio Valley received a report that UTV Austin C. Settoon, pushing three barges loaded with approximately 3,780,000 gallons of natural gas condensate, allided with the lock wall at approximately 5:30 a.m. The barges subsequently broke away. One barge is contained in the lock while the remaining two barges are pinned against gates seven and eight of the dam, with the vessel pinned against gates six and seven. The Racine Lock and Dam is closed, creating a queue of 13 upbound vessels and 11 downbound vessels.

OP/Ed: New Year, New Opportunity

The start of a new year often brings change, but in the nation’s capital, 2017 means a new President and Administration, and a new Congress. Waterways Council, Inc.’s objective remains the same as it has since our start in 2005: to advocate for a modern, efficient and reliable inland waterways transportation system. For WCI, achieving this means working from our “three-legged advocacy stool” approach to educating these new Washingtonians through direct lobbying, stakeholder support and outreach, and media relations.

Collision Continues To Block Ohio River

Marine traffic on the Ohio River was blocked Tuesday as cleanup efforts continued following the collision of a barge carrying gasoline and a docked barge filled with a plastic-making chemical. The USCG said work crews were making progress unloading the two barges, which joined together in the collision.

Op/Ed: USCG Forges the Future of Navigation

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hollyhock is one of six cutters and multiple shore units presently tasked with aids-to-navigation duties within the Great Lakes for the operation. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Nick Gould)

Maintaining the system of buoys and beacons that guide mariners through our nation’s waterways is the United States Coast Guard’s oldest mission. Tracing its roots to the ninth law passed by Congress in 1790 that moved lighthouses under Federal control, the U.S. Lighthouse Service and its vast portfolio of buoys, beacons, buoy tenders and lightships were a founding part of the U.S. Coast Guard in 1939. Along with the mission, many of the beacons the Coast Guard maintains today date back centuries.

Campbell Acquires Barges, Towboats from ACBL

Photo: Campbell Transportation Company, Inc.

Campbell Transportation Company, Inc. said it has signed an agreement with American Commercial Barge Line LLC (ACBL) to acquire certain affreightment contracts along with 155 barges and four towboats that will operate on the Ohio River system. Campbell said it expects to close the transaction by the end of the second quarter, subject to customary closing conditions. Once the acquisition has been completed, Campbell will own and/or manage more than 1,100 barges and 50 towboats on the inland waterways, along with four shipyard facilities and a marine construction company.

Rolling on the River with CORBA

Image Credit: Carlisle & Bray

As the Central Ohio River Business Association (CORBA) pushes commerce on the Ohio River, stakeholders are beginning to take notice. On January 19, in an office tower overlooking the Ohio River, Eric Thomas convened the first meeting of 2017 for a business group working in the 13th largest port in the U.S.: the Ports of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky (PCNK). Thomas serves as the Executive Director of CORBA – the Central Ohio River Business Association. PCNK’s high rank is likely a surprise to many.

USCG Closes Ohio River Again

According to reports, shortly after reopening, the Ohio River was again closed because of falling water levels from the worst Midwest drought in 17 years, U.S. Coast Guard officials said. A vessel towing 13 barges ran aground near Cairo, Illinois. The Coast Guard freed the barges but declared a safety zone and closed the river at 11:30 a.m. A test tow launched by the Coast Guard drafting 9 feet, 6 inches ran aground, reducing the possibility that vessels could go through the area on a case-by-case basis. About 20 vessels towing barges were waiting to pass through a seven-mile stretch of the Ohio River, near where it meets the Mississippi River. Mile markers 969 to 976 have become a choke point and caused barge freight rates to rise. Beginning Sunday, the U.S.

Boston Whaler Fights Ohio River Crime

Boston Whaler 25-foot Guardian

Residents and businesses along the Ohio River in Beaver County, Penn., will soon see a new Boston Whaler 25-foot Guardian on patrol. More than $3.4 billion worth of goods is transported through the county annually via the river. A recent risk assessment exercise revealed that law enforcement was not adequately equipped to handle a crisis on the waterway. Crime-related or emergency incidents historically have been handled by non-local response teams, which significantly increased response times.

Barge Leaking in Ohio River

A barge was lodged against the K & I Railroad Bridge last night, leaking hot asphalt and diesel fuel into the Ohio River, as reported by the Louisville Courier-Journal. It was one of three barges that broke loose from their tow January 26 near McAlpine Locks, with two going over the dam's spillway. The Sherman Minton Bridge was closed briefly about 7:30 p.m, but reopened minutes later, when it appeared the barge was sinking. The barge was buckling, turned on its side against two pilings of the K & I. People who live near the area were complaining of diesel fumes. Tests showed the concentration of diesel to be one part per million. Authorities couldn't tell how much diesel or asphalt had leaked into the river because of darkness.

Leaking Barge Shuts Ohio River Traffic

Commercial traffic was halted along a five mile stretch of the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky, following a barge accident, www.planetark.com reported. A barge carrying 20,000 barrels of liquid asphalt and 14,000 gallons of diesel fuel broke away from its tow the afternoon of January 26 as it was approaching the McAlpine Locks. The barge went over the spillway and was pinned against the K&I Railroad Bridge. The Coast Guard was evaluating when it could reopen the stretch from mile marker 606 to 611. An unknown amount of liquid asphalt and fuel had leaked into the river from the barge, which was still pinned against the bridge on January 27. No injuries related to the accident were reported and the cause of the accident has not yet been determined. (Source: www.planetark.com)

Campbell CEO Stephaich Weighs in on All Things Inland

(Photo: Campbell Transportation Company)

Peter H. Stephaich is Chairman and CEO of Blue Danube Incorporated and Campbell Transportation Company. Peter is also on the Board of Directors of Blue Danube, a position that he has held since 1982. If today he isn’t the most familiar name on the domestic waterfront, then perhaps, he should be. Serving the barge industry for over 30 years in a number of key roles, he also counts among his many qualifications his tenure(s) as Past Chairman and Past Treasurer of the American Waterways Operators (AWO)…

New Fireboat Delivered in Pittsburgh

(Photo courtesy of Ronald Roth, MD, Medical Director, City of Pittsburgh Department of Public Safety.)

Lake Assault Boats said it has delivered a 34-foot fireboat to the Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire in Pittsburgh, Penn. The vessel is the department’s first new dedicated fireboat since 1974. The new fireboat, named after Pittsburgh’s first female mayor, Sophie Masloff, who passed away in 2014, was dedicated on October 27. In a formal ceremony, the former mayor’s eldest granddaughter broke a bottle of champagne on the boat’s gunnel as it was launched into the Ohio River. The Lake Assault deep V-hull fireboat respond to emergencies and help manage fires on the waterways…

Ohio River Towboat Captain Navigates a Changing America

A coal barge underway on U.S. inland waterways (CREDIT: AEP)

In the 29 years that towboat captain Joe Gray has worked flotillas of barges up and down the Ohio River, he has witnessed the decline at the heart of industrial America in what is known as the country's Rust Belt. Gray, 46, spends up to eight months a year doing 28-day stints on the barges carrying coal, corn and gravel between Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Cairo, Illinois. Some 600 million tons of goods still flow each year along 25,000 miles of U.S. waterways. But he has seen a growing number of coal-fired power plants being dismantled…

Op/Ed: Real World Infrastructure Needs

Credit: Thomas Rollins

Over the last few months, the inland waterways system has been particularly stressed by both emergency and Mother Nature-inflicted outages at key locks and dams. Lock and Dam (L&D) 52 on the Ohio River was closed September 6-14 when the dam’s low-lift wooden wickets could not be raised to hold a stable pool for navigation, halting shipping on the river. Given the river’s conditions, the wicket gates had to be raised individually, by hand, to impound water to create the pool. While raising the wickets, the U.S.

62 Barges Break Free on Ohio River

More than five dozen barges have reportedly broken free due to ice and high water at two separate locations on the Ohio River. So far 59 of the 62 breakaway barges have been recovered, according to the U.S. Coast Guard, who said it is working alongside the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and industry partners in response to the incidents near Pittsburgh, Pa., and Moundsville, W.Va. By Monday, 34 of the reported 35 breakaway barges from fleeting areas at mile maker 94 near Moundsville have been recovered and secured, while 25 of the 27 breakaway barges from Jack’s Run Fleeting area at mile marker 4 near Pittsburgh have been accounted for, and security video has shown seven of the barges went over Emsworth Lock & Dam.

Recovery Continues after Ohio River Barge Breakaways

27 barges broke away from Jack’s Run Fleeting area at mile marker 4 on the Ohio River and many collected at the Emsworth Lock and Dam near Pittsburgh on January 13 (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Travis Magee)

A unified command consisting of the U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and industry partners continues to remove barges involved in the breakaways on the Ohio River near Pittsburgh, Pa., and Moundsville, W.Va., Tuesday. Five barges have been successfully cleared from above the dam at Emsworth including two that were blocking salvage crews' access to a barge lodged against Gate 8. Industry partners are continuing salvaging operations near Moundsville and have successfully removed one barge from the channel at mile marker 104.7.

Trump’s Infrastructure Proposals Disappoint -WCI

President Trump announces his infrastructure initiative on June 7, 2017 (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)

Waterways Council, Inc. (WCI) reacted to the Trump Administration infrastructure principles released today, expressing disappointment that the proposal moves toward eliminating the role of the Federal government to construct, operate and maintain the nation’s waterways by transferring that responsibility to nonfederal public or private entities. The President’s FY2019 budget request and the infrastructure initiative also propose to modernize the waterways transportation system…

Global Achieves 10,000 Dives on a Single Project

Photo: Global Diving & Salvage

Global Diving & Salvage, Inc. has surpassed the 10,000 dives on a single project at Olmsted Locks & Dam in Illinois. Tom Cameron, a long-time diver with Global, performed the 10,000th dive. Wade Miller, Marine Construction Manager with AECOM for the Olmsted Dam Project, said, “The Global team has done an exceptional job. Global has been working at Olmsted since 2009 providing a variety of dive-related services. Olmsted is a significant, ongoing undertaking. The new locks and dam system will replace two outdated locks and dam systems on the Ohio River…

Op/Ed: Disconnect from River to Washington

© Jeffery Everson / Adobe Stock

Just before the anticipation of good things to come on Valentine’s Day, on February 12, the inland waterways transportation industry was left feeling disappointed and puzzled after the release of the long-awaited Trump Administration infrastructure principles, and then the release of President Trump’s FY 2019 budget request. During the Presidential campaign, then-candidate Trump said he would undertake a $1 trillion infrastructure initiative that would focus on a wide array of projects, from sewer systems to bridges to Veterans Hospitals to rural broadband expansion.

Runaway Barge Sinks in the Ohio River

Divers are working to pinpoint the location of a runaway barge that sank in the Ohio River near Cairo, Illinois, on Wednesday.The U.S. Coast Guard said the missing barge is one of six to have broken free from a towing vessel near mile marker 964. The other five barges have been located and secured.Divers are scheduled to search using side scan sonar.The sunken barge is carrying a cargo of pig iron.The Army Corps of Engineers has closed the Olmsted Lock and Dam until the lost barge is located.The Coast Guard is broadcasting a safety message to notify mariners of the situation.

Sunken Barge Located in the Ohio River

A runaway barge that went missing after sinking near Cairo, Illinois has been located near mile marker 964 on the Ohio River on Thursday.The barge carrying pig iron is one of six that broke free from a towing vessel near mile marker 964 on Wednesday. The other five barges were quickly located and secured.The U.S. Coast Guard said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Tennessee Valley Towing working to devise a plan to salvage the sunken barge.The Olmsted Lock and Dam, which was closed due to the missing barge, was reopened Thursday. There are no waterway closures due to the incident.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Green Marine Technology

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