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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Sea Level News

Oil from Sunken Iranian Tanker Diffusing in East China Sea

(Photo: China's State Oceanic Administration)

Oil from an Iranian tanker that sank in the East China Sea has diffused into four separate slicks, covering a combined area of just over 100 square kms (39 square miles), Chinese authorites said late on Wednesday. Earlier satellite imaging showed two large slicks, with the larger one also thicker and more concentrated, but the latest data had found four slicks ranging in size from 48 square kms (19 square miles) to 5.5 square kms (2.1 square miles), the State Oceanic Administration (SOA) said.

Iranian Tanker Produces 2 Slicks in East China Sea

File Image: The stricken tanker Sanchi burns prior to sinking. (CREDIT: china Ministry of Transport)

An Iranian oil tanker that sank in the East China Sea has left two oil slicks covering a combined 109 square km (42 square miles), the Chinese government said, as maritime police scoured for damage and prepared to explore the wreck. Satellite imaging showed a slick of 69 square km (26.6 square miles) and a second 40 square km (15.4 square miles) slick, which is less thick and not as concentrated, the State Oceanic Administration (SOA) said in a statement late on Tuesday. The large tanker Sanchi (IMO:9356608) sank in the worst oil ship disaster in decades on Sunday…

The Impact of Future Global Tides on Energy

Photo: The National Oceanography Centre (NOC), the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)

The first comprehensive study of the impact of global sea-level rise on tides has implications for future coastal flood risk, harbour management, and the long term planning of tidal energy sites. This research, published in Continental Shelf Research by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), University of Southampton and Deltares, shows that sea-level rise can significantly alter tides across the world in many different ways in both space and time. The change will be most pronounced in shelf seas on the east coast of the Americas…

Study: Rising Sea Level Puts 150 Million at Risk

Photo courtesy National Oceanography Centre

For 150 million people living in coastal areas around the world, rising sea level will become a genuine threat, according to a new international study which found evidence the sea level has been rising over the past 200 years – and continues to rise. Ocean warming and glaciers/ice sheets melting are the causes of the sea level rise, said Dr. Svetlana Jevrejeva from the U.K.’s National Oceanography Centre (NOC), who coauthored the scientific research paper “Trends and acceleration in global and regional sea levels since 1807…

Sea Level Rise Accelerating in U.S. Atlantic Coast “Hotspot”

Rates of sea level rise are increasing three-to-four times faster along portions of the U.S. Atlantic Coast than globally, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey report published in Nature Climate Change. Since about 1990, sea-level rise in the 600-mile stretch of coastal zone from Cape Hatteras, N.C. to north of Boston, Mass. -- coined a “hotspot” by scientists -- has increased 2 - 3.7 millimeters per year; the global increase over the same period was 0.6 – 1.0 millimeter per year. Based on data and analyses included in the report, if global temperatures continue to rise, rates of sea level rise in this area are expected to continue increasing. The report shows that the sea-level rise hotspot is consistent with the slowing of Atlantic Ocean circulation.

Sea Level Rise ‘Worst Case Scenario’

Surge picture from November 9, 2007 (Image courtesy of NOC)

A paper published this week in Environmental Research Letters by NOC scientist Dr. Svetlana Jevrejeva provides new information about the probability of a sea-level rise reaching of 180cm by 2100. In this study Dr. Jevrejeva and colleagues explore the range of possible sea level rise by 2100 and add new data to the estimates currently available. Previously an upper limit, or ‘worst case scenario’, has not been possible to calculate, but this new study now looks beyond the previous data available to provide a more complete picture.

SEA LEVEL MARINE Wraps Up Busy Year

Crystal Serenity Penthouse

Miami-based SEA LEVEL MARINE, full-service marine outfitting contractor, celebrates completion of the renovation of Britto Art Gallery, Cupcake Cupboard, Nursery, and Vintages Wine Bar aboard the Liberty of the Seas (January 2011) and Freedom of the Seas (March 2011). The project was completed in seven days during dry-dock in Freeport, Grand Bahama. For these renovations, the SEA LEVEL team led an experienced crew of more than 75 craftsmen and technicians in transforming these spaces to duplicate new venues introduced on the Oasis of the Seas and Allure of the Seas.

Accelerating Sea Level Rise Threatens Coasts

Sea level rise in the past two decades has accelerated faster than previously thought in a sign of climate change threatening coasts from Florida to Bangladesh, a study said on Wednesday. The report, reassessing records from more than 600 tidal gauges, found that readings from 1901-90 had over-estimated the rise in sea levels. Based on revised figures for those years, the acceleration since then was greater than so far assumed. The report said the earlier readings were incomplete or skewed by local factors such as subsidence. The new analysis "suggests that the acceleration in the past two decades is 25 percent higher than previously thought," Carling Hay, a Canadian scientist at Harvard University and lead author of the study in the journal Nature, told Reuters.

R&M Group Merges with Sea Level Marine

l.t.r.: Thomas Grunwald (R&M USA), Darelynn Prejean, Barry Lee (Sea Level Marine)

R&M Ship Technologies USA, Inc. has merged Sea Level Marine, LLC. in efforts to increase the range of services offered to the company’s global client base. By aligning resources, customers will benefit from the ships’ lifecycle services and enhanced portfolio, combining Sea Level's established offerings with R&M Group's portfolio, along an expanded network of resources across the globe. Based in Miami, Sea Level Marine is a provider of cruise ship interior outfitting services…

Waterfront Protection against Global Warming

Rising sea levels and changes in water chemistry in New York Harbor and beyond should trigger a comprehensive planning effort to protect waterfront development from the threat of potential inundation, according to Malcolm G. McLaren of McLaren Engineering Group. “People know about global warming but very little discussion has centered on how to plan for it,” said McLaren, founder, president and CEO of the West Nyack, N.Y.-based firm. “If sea levels continue to rise at their current rate, large stretches of shoreline development will be jeopardized. Due in part to glacial melting, tide levels around New York Harbor have risen more than a foot since the original mean sea-level readings were established in Sandy Hook, N.J., some 80 years ago.

Seas Will Deepen Predicts NOAA

NOAA publishes a new technical memorandum that estimates global mean sea level rise over the next century. The report finds that there is very high confidence (greater than 90% chance) that global mean sea level will rise at least 8 inches (0.2 meters) and no more than 6.6 feet (2 meters) by 2100, depending upon uncertainties associated with ice sheet loss and ocean warming. The actual amount of sea level change at any one region and location greatly varies in response to regional and local vertical land movement and ocean dynamics. The ranges of global mean sea level rise estimates detailed in this study will help decision makers prepare for and respond to a wide range of future sea level rise and coastal inundation.

Strange But True: Sea Levels Dropped Due to More Rainfall

Research scientist explains how it rained more yet the global average sea level fell for eighteen months up to mid-2011. Current perception of climate change leads us to believe that sea levels, measured by bouncing microwaves off of the ocean at many points around the globe, are constantly rising due to thermal expansion and melting ice caps. However, from the beginning of 2010 until mid-2011, the average level of the world's oceans dropped by 0.2 inches, reports ENN (Environmental News Network). According to a recent study by Carmen Boening, a researcher at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, this sea level decline was due to an increase in the amount of rainfall in Australia, northern South America and Southeast Asia.

Sea-Level-Rise Forecasts Major Climate Impact to Pacific Islands

Photo: USGS

Dynamic modeling of sea-level rise, which takes storm wind and wave action into account, paints a much graver picture for some low-lying Pacific islands under climate-change scenarios than the passive computer modeling used in earlier research, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey report. A team led by research oceanographer Curt Storlazzi of the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center compared passive "bathtub" inundation models with dynamic models for two of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

Sea Level Rise Projected to Displace 13 million in U.S. by 2100

The number of people who could be displaced in U.S. coastal regions due to rising sea levels this century as a result of climate change is much higher than previously thought, with more than 13 million Americans at risk with a 6-foot (1.8 meters) rise including 6 million in Florida, scientists said on Monday. The researchers assessed sea level change scenarios by 2100 from the U.S. Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for coastal states along with population growth trends and projections in high-risk areas. With a sea level rise of 3 feet, locations forecast to house 4.2 million people would be at risk of inundation while a doubling of the rise would bring the number to 13.1 million.

Scientists Say Antarctic Glaciers in 'Irreversible' Thaw

Image credit: British Antarctic Survey

Vast glaciers in West Antarctica seem to be locked in an irreversible thaw linked to global warming that may push up sea levels for centuries, scientists said on Monday. Six glaciers, eaten away from below by a warming of sea waters around the frozen continent, were flowing fast into the Amundsen Sea, according to the report based partly on satellite radar measurements from 1992 to 2011. Evidence shows "a large sector of the West Antarctic ice sheet has gone into a state of irreversible retreat"…

West Antarctic Ice Sheet: How Stable is it?

West Antarctic Ice Sheet Photo courtesy   Alfred Wegener Institute

A future warming of the Southern Ocean caused by rising greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere may severely disrupt the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The result would be a rise in the global sea level by several metres. A collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet may have occurred during the last interglacial period 125,000 years ago, a period when the polar surface temperature was around two degrees Celsius higher than today. This is the result of a series of model simulations which the researchers of the Alfred Wegener Institute…

NOAA: US to See More Floods from Sea Level Rise

Annapolis, Maryland, pictured here in 2012, is one of three major East Coast urban areas already being faced with nuisance flooding in excess of 30 days per year. (Credit: With permission from Amy McGovern.)

Most of U.S. coast may see 30 or more days a year of floods up to 2 feet above high tides. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened by 30 or more days of flooding each year due to dramatically accelerating impacts from sea level rise, according to a new NOAA study, published in the American Geophysical Union’s online peer-reviewed journal Earth’s Future. The findings appear in the paper From the Extreme to the Mean: Acceleration and Tipping Points for Coastal Inundation due to Sea Level Rise…

Sea Level Anomaly Along U.S. Atlantic Coast

Persistent winds and a weakened current in the Mid-Atlantic contributed to higher than normal sea levels along the Eastern Seaboard in June and July, according to a new NOAA technical report. After observing water levels six inches to two feet higher than originally predicted, NOAA scientists began analyzing data from select tide stations and buoys from Maine to Florida and found that a weakening of the Florida Current Transport—an oceanic current that feeds into the Gulf Stream—in addition to steady and persistent Northeast winds, contributed to this anomaly. “The ocean is dynamic and it’s not uncommon to have anomalies,” said Mike Szabados, director of NOAA’s Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services.

Rising Seas Wash Japanese War Dead from Pacific Island Graves

Rising sea levels have washed the remains of at least 26 Japanese World War Two soldiers from their graves on a low-lying Pacific archipelago, the foreign minister of the Marshall Islands said on Friday. "There are coffins and dead people being washed away from graves. It's that serious," Tony de Brum told reporters on the sidelines of U.N. climate change talks in Germany. Twenty-six skeletons have been found on Santo Island after high tides battered the archipelago from February to April, he said, adding that more may be found. Unexploded bombs and other military equipment have also washed up in recent months. "We think they are Japanese soldiers," de Brum said. "We had the exhumed skeletons sampled by the U.S.

Seas Could Rise 6m Even if Govts Curb Warming -Study

File photo

Sea levels could rise by at least six metres (20 feet) in the long term, swamping coasts from Florida to Bangladesh, even if governments achieve their goals for curbing global warming, according to a study published on Thursday. Tracts of ice in Greenland and Antarctica melted when temperatures were around or slightly higher than today in ancient thaws in the past three million years, a U.S.-led international team wrote in the journal Science. And the world may be headed for a…

Sea Level Marine Completes Majesty of the Seas Project

Miami-based Sea Level Marine, full-service marine refurbishment contractor, completed the renovation of the Boleros mid-ship lounge and Casino Royale aboard the Majesty of the Seas. The project was completed in 22 days, and ahead of schedule, during dry-dock in Freeport, Grand Bahama. For the Majesty renovation, the Sea Level team led an experienced crew of more than 60 craftsmen and technicians in transforming the Majesty's mid-ship Boleros Lounge and Casino Royale. The Boleros project involved revitalizing the room's finishes and furnishings to create the vessel’s new signature Latin theme nightclub. A full service bar recessed into the deck acts as the centerpiece of the new design.

Satellite Maps Arctic Ocean Floor

While the main objective of the polar-orbiting CryoSat is to measure the thickness of polar sea ice and ice sheets that blanket Greenland and Antarctica, its radar altimeter can also measure tiny changes in sea level, 'Terra Daily' is informed by a European Space Agency report. Variation in sea level mimics the rises and dips of the ocean floor beneath due to the pull of gravity, as areas of greater mass such as underwater mountains have a stronger pull, attracting more water and producing a minor increase in ocean-surface height, researchers said. The CryoSat data combined with ongoing ocean mapping will result in global seafloor topography -- bathymetry -- two to four times more accurate than measurements currently available, they said.

Melting Sea Ice: A Canary in the Coal Mine

© André Gilden / Adobe Stock

The rapid loss of Arctic sea ice is a sentinel. Most of us will never venture into the Arctic, but it can and does provide us with a forewarning of impacts coming to our parts of the Earth – and some of the most significant impacts will directly affect the maritime industry. In earlier times, coal miners were sometimes overcome by the buildup of odorless carbon monoxide gas. Some died as a consequence. Eventually it was realized that canaries were more susceptible to the gas than were humans.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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