Marine Link
Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Canadian Government News

Wärtsilä Modernizing Vessel for CCG

The Canadian Coast Guard's vessel Ann Harvey will be equipped with new propulsion generators, which will contribute to the vessel's reliability for many years to come. (Photo: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä will support the 1100 Class High Endurance Multitask Vessels operated by the Canadian Coast Guard, to renew their current propulsion generators. These vessels serve for buoy tending, search and rescue and icebreaking in each of the three Region of the Canadian Coast Guard. The new, more modern propulsion generators will contribute to the vessel's reliability for many years to come. Furthermore, the standards of engineering and fuel consumption for the new engines will lead to reduced operational costs and lower emissions.

TransCanada Says Petronas LNG Project Plans to Go Ahead

TransCanada Corp said on Friday a consortium led by Malaysian national oil company Petronas has decided to proceed with plans to build a terminal in northern British Columbia to export Canadian natural gas to Asia. TransCanada said it plans to start construction this year of the Prince Rupert Gas Transmission line, to connect the Montney field near Fort St. John, British Columbia, to the PNW LNG terminal at Lelu Island, near Prince Rupert. The final decision on the line will be confirmed by the partners of PNW LNG after receiving approvals from the British Columbia and Canadian governments, TransCanada said. TransCanada said it planned to put the 900-km (560-mile) into service by 2019-20.

Irving Shipbuilding Wins Lion's Share of Historic Contract

Halifax's Irving Shipbuilding is getting the $25 billion contract to build 21 Canadian combat ships and Vancouver's Seaspan Marine has been awarded an $8 billion contract for 7 non-combat vessels, the federal government announced, which is the manifestation of the Canadian government's National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS), designed to envigorate the country's shipbuilding industrial base and manufacture a fleet of vessels to protect the country vital interests in the quickly melting Arctic region.

Canada Says Lifting Some Sanctions Against Iran

The Canadian government said on Friday it was lifting some sanctions against Iran, including the broad ban on financial services, imports and exports, making Canadian companies more competitive against rivals doing business in Iran.   In a statement, the government said all applications for export permits will be considered on a case-by-case basis.     (Reporting by David Ljunggren in Ottawa, writing by Andrea Hopkins in Toronto)

System Control Cameras for RCN Halifax-class

POE Camera: Photo credit Kongsberg

The HALIFAX class frigate (hull designation FFH) is a class of 12 multi-role patrol frigates that has served the Canadian Forces since 1992. In 2007, the Canadian government announced a planned refit of the HALIFAX class known as the HALIFAX Class Modernization Project. The cameras will be provided to prime contractor L-3 MAPPS for installation in its integrated management system upgrade of control systems for propulsion plant, electrical functions, damage control machinery and other systems.

Canadian Shipowners Applaud Government's Icebreaker Response

Robert Lewis-Manning: Photo CSA

The Canadian Shipowners Association (CSA) says it is extremely pleased that the Government of Canada is responding to the need for additional icebreaking support on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Waterway, as with another icebreaker, key cargo such as wheat, will move to market quicker. "This is an important move by the Canadian Government to support the Canadian short sea shipping industry on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Waterway," said Robert Lewis-Manning, President of the Canadian Shipowners Association.

Continued Support for GLSLS

Fifty years after the official opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Canadian and U.S. Seaway corporations remain resolute in their commitment to the sustainability of this bi-national transportation system. A recent U.S. and Canadian Government study concluded that the use of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway (GLSLS) saves consumers $3.6 billion per year in shipping costs. In addition, over 150,000 jobs on both sides of the border are dependent on GLSLS shipping.

Supertankers Pose No Danger to Bay of Fundy

Proponents of a controversial liquefied natural gas plant in Maine say a study ordered by the Canadian government has found there is no reason to ban supertankers from the Bay of Fundy, as Ottawa has threatened to do if the U.S. approves the project. Downeast LNG said the environmental study found there were no immediate risks of having LNG supertankers go through the Bay of Fundy, part of which is split by the New Brunswick-Maine border, to the proposed plant. Dean Girdis, the Washing-ton-based president of Downeast LNG, said the long-awaited review, done by Ottawa-based Senes Consultants Ltd., found there was no immediate danger of having the 283-metre long ships go through a narrow passage in Canadian waters called Head Harbour if precautions were taken.

Canada Firm on LNG Tanker Stance

A federal study has concluded that LNG tankers could navigate Head Harbour Passage off the Bay of Fundy with little risk of accident, but the Canadian government continued to insist that it will bar U.S. tankers from the disputed waters. Proponents of the competing LNG plants proposed for northern Maine have seized on the study to argue that the Canadian government has exaggerated the safety concerns in order to favour domestic producers. The federal government has refused to co-operate with U.S. regulators who are reviewing three separate plans for terminals that will regasify imported liquefied natural gas and pipe it to markets in the U.S. Northeast. Earlier this year, Canada's Ambassador in Washington, Michael Wilson, wrote to U.S.

Canadian Drydocking Contracts Placed for Two Coast Guard Ships

CCGS Dumit: Photo credit Canadian Govt.

The Canadian government has announced the award of two contracts totaling $1.1M to Northern Transportation Company Limited for Vessel Life Extension refit work to Canadian Coast Guard ships 'CCGS Dumit' and 'CCGS Eckaloo'. These two vessels, based in Hay River, provide Aid to Navigation services on the Mackenzie River. Vessel condition surveys are being conducted on the CCGS Dumit and CCGS Eckaloo in advance of the vessel life extension work which will take place in multiple phases beginning in October 2014.

Giant Iceberg Drifting Toward Canada

According to an August 10 report from Postmedia News, the Canadian government is planning how to deal with a massive iceberg that broke off a Greenland glacier last week and is expected to drift south over the next two years into East Coast shipping lanes and toward offshore oil platforms. At 250 sq kilometers, the iceberg is the biggest free-floating mass of ice in the Arctic Ocean in 50 years. (Source: Postmedia News)

Canadian Shipbuilding Dispute

According to a report from UPI.com, the Canadian government is pressuring the nation's shipbuilding companies to waive their rights to consult lobbyists in pursuit of the $35b national shipbuilding procurement strategy.   Source: UPI.com  

Cananda Chamber of Shipping on Anchorage Operations

Photo: The Chamber of Shipping

The Chamber of Shipping welcomes the federal government’s announcement of details concerning the review and modernization of anchorage operations as part of the Oceans Protection Plan. Commercial shipping results in $30 billion of economic activity annually in Canada and, at 1.8% of the Canadian economy, ships move more than $200 billion worth of goods to and from global markets. From farmers to retailers, many Canadian jobs depend on a healthy and thriving trade environment supported by a robust and fluid marine transportation network.

KR Statutory Services Authorized in Canada

Korean Register (KR), an IACS member classification society, has been fully authorized by the Marine Safety and Security Division of Transport Canada to perform statutory services on behalf of the government of Canada. KR is now able to conduct relevant surveys, audits and issue certificates to Canadian flagged ships for SOLAS, MARPOL, ITC, ILL, and ISM Code. Because of Canada’s geography the administration is particularly active in the Polar Code discussions within IMO and KR believes that this authorization will assist other KR classed vessels operating in Arctic waters. KR opened an office in Vancouver in 2012 and underwent an audit by the Canadian government at its Busan headquarters in June 2014 and its Vancouver office in July 2014.

CG Commandant to Speak at Conference

More than 400 U.S. and Canadian government, commercial and environmental officials will meet for a two-day conference beginningWednesday, January 29 at the Sheraton Cleveland City Center. Known as Marine Community Days, this event brings together the U.S. and Canadian members of the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway marine community to discuss a broad range of issues. Discussion topics will include: Homeland Security, the Maritime Transportation System, maritime security, navigation, environmental issues and dredging. This year’s theme is “Canadian/US Partnership” and features quest speakers: Adm. Thomas Collins, Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Vice Adm. James Hull, Commander Atlantic Area, Julian Goodyear, Reginal Director, Central and Artic Region, Canadian Coast Guard, Maj. Gen.

Canada to Get 6 CG Vessels for $324m

The Canadian government will reportedly spend $324 million to purchase six new vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard, according to a report on www.cbc.ca. The vessels will reportedly include four midshore patrol vessels, one offshore science vessel and one hovercraft. Three of the vessels are bound for British Columbia, two are destined for Nova Scotia and one will go to Quebec. All six will be built in Canada, which should boost the country's shipbuilding industry. In addition to the six new vessels, Hearn said the coast guard will spend $17 million to buy a high-speed air cushion vehicle that will be used in search and rescue services in Quebec.

Canadian Icebreaker Refit Contracts Awarded

Principals in Davie Refit Contract: Image Davie

The Canadian Government informs it has awarded a $6.5 million contract to Babcock Canada Inc. for critical refit work for Canadian Coast Guard ship 'CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent'. The shipyard portion of the work will be carried out by Chantier Davie Canada Inc., a sub-contractor to Babcock Canada. The CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent is Canada’s largest and heaviest icebreaker. While in drydock at the Davie Shipyard in Levis, Quebec, the vessel will undergo critical maintenance. This work…

Seaspan’s Selects PEMA Equipment for NSPS Project

Photo: PEMA

The National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS) is an initiative of the Canadian Government to build new ships for the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Coast Guard. Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards won the right to bid on the non-combat vessels under this strategy, and as such is proceeding with a $200 million Shipyard Modernization Program to support execution. As a part of modernization project, Seaspan selected PEMA welding automation equipment for their panel production.

ShipConstructor Congratulates Seaspan & Irving

ShipConstructor Software Inc. (SSI) congratulates Seaspan and Irving on being awarded contracts under the Canadian Government’s National Shipbuilding Procurement strategy. “As a supporter of the revitalization of the Canadian Navy, Coast Guard and the country’s shipbuilding industry in general, SSI believes that the award of these contracts is significant to the entire nation,” said CEO Darren Larkins. Thousands of direct jobs will be created as a result of these awards and many ancillary companies in the marine related industry stand to benefit as well. SSI looks forward to the revitalization of the Canadian fleet.

Lack of Ice-Breakers Delays Great Lakes Shipping

With the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway facing the thickest and broadest ice cover in years, the Canadian Shipowners Association (CSA) is extremely concerned that Canada's ice-breakers will not be able to create and maintain the routes needed to move key cargo to Canadian and American industries. The Canadian Coast Guard is doing its utmost to work with resources across a large geographical area subject to heavy ice, but this situation is rippling into Canada's transportation and economic system.

Ottawa Bars Use of 'Buy America' Rules at Ferry Project in Canada

The Canadian government signed an order on Monday blocking the United States from applying controversial "Buy America" purchasing rules on the demolition and reconstruction of a ferry terminal that is located on Canada's Pacific Coast but operated by Alaska's Department of Transportation. The U.S. federal rules are designed to protect U.S. companies from foreign competition in transportation infrastructure projects. The state of Alaska has refused to waive the provisions for the $15 million rebuild of the Prince Rupert, British Columbia, ferry terminal although the project is solidly in Canadian territory. Canada is fighting back by invoking rarely used anti-sanction laws to prevent bidders on the project from agreeing to use only U.S.-made iron and steel.

Canada Invests in a Greener Coast Guard College

Photo: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Canada’s government has invested nearly $11 million to date for improvements and repairs to the Canadian Coast Guard College. The government of Canada is investing $8.6 million to replace the college’s roof, addition to $2.3 million already devoted to upgrading the emergency electrical system, announced transport minister Lisa Raitt on behalf of the fisheries and oceans minister Gail Shea. The investments aim to further reduce the college’s energy consumption while ensuring it maintains international standards for marine safety and environmental response training.

OSI Navigation System for Canadian Navy

OSI Maritime Systems Ltd. (OSI) announced today that it has been selected by Lockheed Martin Canada to support the design activity of the bridge and navigation capabilities for the Royal Canadian Navy’s (RCN) new class of Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS). Lockheed Martin Canada is one of AOPS Prime Contractor Irving Shipbuilding’s Tier 1 suppliers for the AOPS project under the Canadian government’s National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). Under an initial contract, OSI will design the Integrated Bridge and Navigation System for the new vessels. “We are very pleased to have been selected for this very important Royal Canadian Navy project,” said Ken Kirkpatrick, President and Chief Executive Officer OSI Maritime Systems Ltd.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2017 - The Workboat Edition

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