Marine Link
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Intracoastal Waterway News

CG Reopens Intracoastal Waterway

The Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur reopened the Intracoastal Waterway after the towing vessel Caroline was refloated Monday. The waterway was closed following a collision between the towing vessel Caroline and the towing vessel Miss Stacie at mile marker 312 on the Intracoastal Waterway early this morning. No injuries were sustained during the collision. A Unified Command comprised of Canal Barge Company, Texas General Land Office, Oil Mop and the Coast Guard was established to respond to the incident. A minimal amount of oil was released from the Caroline and was cleaned up by Oil Mop. The Caroline was re-floated at 11:10 and was then towed to Bollinger Shipyard in Lake Charles, La., for repairs. The Caroline’s barges were transported to Houston by the towing vessel Coushatta.

Barge Sinks in Intracoastal Waterway

A 264-ft. barge containing crushed limestone sits in the Intracoastal Waterway at mile marker 171, west of the Harvey Locks in Louisiana. The Coast Guard established a safety zone around the barge and will oversee offload and salvage operations. The barge is owned and operated by Lalande Towing Operators LLC, based in Iberia, La. Photograph courtesy of Harold J. Trahan, lockmaster at the Leland Bowman Lock

Coast Survey to Resove Magenta Line Issues

The Office of Coast Survey has announced that future editions of nautical charts of the Intracoastal Waterway will be updated to include an improved "magenta line" that has historically aided navigation down the East Coast and around the Gulf Coast. Additionally, Coast Survey will change the magenta line's function, from the perceived "recommended route" established more than a hundred years ago, to an advisory directional guide that helps prevent boaters from going astray in the maze of channels that comprise the route.

Tell NOAA If You Think the IWR Still Needs the 'Magenta Route'

NOAA Chart 11489 shows the so-called 'magenta line': Image courtesy of NOAA

If you are a recreational boater, fisherman, or another member of the maritime community, NOAA's Office of Coast Survey wants to pick your brain about the "magenta line," which historically depicted the recommended route for the Intracoastal Waterway Route (IWR) on NOAA nautical charts. A recent Federal Register Notice outlines NOAA's options for improving the accuracy of the magenta line, which is presently being removed from new editions of nautical charts. Federal funding does not allow for consistent maintenance of the 3…

Barge Collision Shuts Waterway

HOUSTON - Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit Galveston temporarily closed the Intracoastal Waterway in Freeport, Texas Tuesday night after a barge collision occured in the Kirby Barge Fleeting area. The tug boat Drum Point, was pushing two barges loaded with Naphtha, when the collision occurred. The third barge contained more than 1 million gallons of Cumene. The collision resulted in a fracture to the hull of the barge containing Cumene. However, no cargo was spilled into the water, and the barges carrying Naphtha were only slightly damaged. The Coast Guard established a safety zone in the waterway surrounding the damaged barge. The Coast Guard also temporarily closed the Intracoastal Waterway until the barge could be moved to repair facilities at the Dow Chemical Plant.

Intracoastal Waterway Reopens after fuel spill

The U.S. Coast Guard reopened the Intracoastal Waterway after fuel that had been spilled earlier this morning dissipated. Pollution investigators from Coast Guard Marine Safety Unit in Port Arthur assessed the waterway and declared that there was no recoverable diesel fuel. The waterway had been closed for six miles west of Lake Charles, La., after fuel being transferred from one tank to another on a tug owned by Kirby Inland Marine overflowed, the Coast Guard said. The Coast Guard was notified by the Houston-based company. The area from mile marker 257 to mile marker 263 was closed. Twelve tugs and barges were delayed by the closure, but are now under way again, the Coast Guard said. Source: Houston Chronicle

AIWA Highlights Investment Needs on the Nation’s Marine Highways

Pickel

Nowhere is that more important than on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. As 2016 begins, we at the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association (AIWA) are looking forward to participating in the ongoing dialogue regarding the need for strategic investments in the Nation’s Marine Transportation System. Our organization advocates for the ongoing maintenance of one of the nation’s longest water infrastructure projects, the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW). Although the waterway has received funding for the past few years, we know that more is needed for this vital transportation route.

Barge Shuts Down Intracoastal Waterway

A partially sunken barge blocked traffic in the Intracoastal Waterway on January 24, halting shipments and costing businesses hundreds of thousands of dollars. Ms. Angel, the giant barge carrying a full load of crushed limestone, began sinking earlier that morning. It was not known when the canal would be reopened. Chemical and petroleum industries, as well as industries transporting dry cargo, including grain and commodities, could be affected because of the blocked waterway. The Coast Guard was notified of the 264-foot sinking barge at approximately 5:15 a.m. Tuesday. The barge rested at mile marker 171, about a mile west of the Forked Island Bridge. By late morning, the traffic was stopped in that reach of the canal.

Oil Spill Closes Intracoastal Waterway

The Intracoastal Waterway has been closed for six miles west of Lake Charles, La., due to an oil spill today initially estimated at 700 gallons. A watchstander at Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur received a call from Kirby Inland Marine reporting fuel from one of their tugs had overflowed into the ICW. The tug was transferring fuel from its fuel tank to its day tank while moving along the ICW when the spill occured. The area from mile marker 257 to mile marker 263 has been closed to all maritime traffic. Crews from MSU Port Arthur are in the process of locating the leading edges of the spill, and Coast Guard Air Station Houston crews launched an HH-65C helicopter to fly over the spill. Pollution Investigators from MSU Port Arthur are on scene.

Texas Barge Collision Halts Oil Traffic

According to a report from Reuters, two barge tows collided in the Intracoastal Waterway between Port Arthur and Galveston, Texas, halting oil industry and other traffic for more than 12 hours, All traffic was halted between mile markers 310 and 315 east of High Island after the accident just before midnight on August 11 at mile marker 312. One-way traffic resumed early August 11 afternoon, and the waterway fully reopened at mid-afternoon, a Coast Guard spokeswoman said. (Source: Reuters)

New Orleans Locks Closed for Emergency Repair

Harvey Lock, located at mile zero on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, was closed to navigation yesterday, June 26, for emergency repairs to lock gate machinery, GAC reported in its daily Hot Port News. This closure is expected to last for two-four days. The Algiers route may be used as an alternate.  

New Orleans – Port Condition ZULU

In preparation for gale force winds from Tropical Storm Cindy, USCG Marine Safety Office New Orleans has set Port Condition ZULU. In addition, the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GICW) has been closed from the Inner Harbor Canal to Mile Marker (MM) 60 east of Harvey Locks, Long Beach, Mississippi. Vessels and facilities are urged to take appropriate precautions. (HK Law)

Marine Design Center to Acquire Barge

The Marine Design Center (MDC) of the USACE intends to obtain an inland river style specialty barge to serve on the USACE Louisville District (CELRL) in support of its mission. Measuring 70 ft. with a 35 ft. beam, the vessel will be used to wash mud and debris from lock walls, miter gates and floating approach walls at the Olmstead Lock & Dam. The vessel will be designed, built and classed to American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) rules for Steel Vessels on Rivers and Intracoastal Waterways.

Bisso Launches New Tug

Bisso Marine used the 700 ton capacity D/B Cappy Bisso to lift a new 635 ton tug Z-Drive Tractor tug. The draft of the tug was too deep to be launched in Houma, LA at the Main Iron Works shipyard, so the tug was lifted on to a materials barge where it was placed into support cribbing then delivered via the Intracoastal Waterway to New Orleans, LA. Once in New Orleans, LA, the D/B Cappy Bisso would again lift the tug from the deck of the materials barge and place it into the Mississippi River at the Foot of Walnut Street at the Bisso Towboat fleet.

Sunken Barge Impedes Waterway Traffic Near Galveston

A barge sank east of the Galveston Causeway railroad bridge Tuesday, causing the U.S. Coast Guard to issue a safety zone and temporarily restrict traffic on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The restriction allows one-way and single-wide barges only, from mile marker 356 to mile marker 357. The owner of the sunken barge has contracted T & T salvage to remove the barge, which was being towed to be scrapped when it sank.

Intracoastal Waterway Reopened after Tug Crash

A Coast Guardsman from the Marine Safety Unit Port Arthur stands at the edge of Black Bayou Bridge observing a damaged fender after it was hit by a boat that lost steering March 7, 2016. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Jennifer Andrew)

The U.S. Coast Guard has removed restrictions for Intracoastal Waterway traffic near the Black Bayou Bridge in Lake Charles, La. The waterway was restricted when a part of the bridge's fendering system was struck by a tug that lost steering with three barges Monday night. The bridge and waterway opened to all highway and vessel traffic at 12:26 p.m. Wednesday. At 10:27 p.m. Monday night, the bridge operator notified the Coast Guard that a towboat was pushing 3 hopper barges and struck the fendering wall that protects the pontoon bridge crossing the waterway.

Shallow Federal Policies Produce Even Shallower AIWW Drafts

Underway and pushing on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway

The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway awaits the chance to rescue the crowded eastern seaboard with a readymade alternative to the parking lot known simply as I-95. The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) extends 1,200 miles from Norfolk, Va. to Key West, Fla.. That much is common knowledge. What you may not know is that the U.S. Congress authorized the creation of the AIWW in 1919 and the entire waterway was completed in 1940. Consisting of natural inlets, salt-water rivers, bays…

Intercoastal Waterway Reopens After Collision

The U.S. Coast Guard Captain of the Port for the Houston/Galveston area informs that a 2-mile stretch of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway between between Bolivar Peninsula and Goat Island has been reopened after a pleasure craft sank in the channel following a collision. The captain of the towing vessel Dixie Courage contacted Coast Guard Sector Houston/Galveston, 1 p.m. Sunday, reporting that his tow and barges had collided with a disabled and adrift 15-foot pleasure craft. The four people aboard the boat jumped overboard and swam to shore before the collision occurred. There were no reports of injuries to either crew or any reports of pollution. The captain of the Dixie Courage reported no damage to the tow boat, but the pleasure craft sank from the damage it sustained.

New Vessel Traffic Control Tower Completed

A new $1.1m Vessel Traffic Control Tower was recently completed at Mile Marker 99 of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway adjacent to Jesse Fontenot Memorial Boat Landing in Berwick, La. The purpose of the tower is to provide additional camera vantage points looking westward along the Intracoastal Waterway, southward along the Lower Atchafalaya River and northward toward Berwick Bay. In addition, the tower will be equipped with a TERMA radar and Automatic Identification System (AIS) transceiver to update and improve the overall Ports and Waterways Safety System in order to provide increased situational awareness for the U. S. Coast Guard vessel traffic controllers at Vessel Traffic Service (VTS) Berwick Bay. Captain Terry Gilbreath, the Commanding Officer of U.

Coast Guard Stages Resources for Post-Hurricane Response

The Coast Guard closed ports and waterways along the gulf coast on Sunday, as well as evacuating its own personnel and resources from out of harms way, in preparation for Hurricane Katrina's landfall Monday. More than 40 Coast Guard aircraft from units along the entire eastern seaboard, along with more than 30 small boats, patrol boats and cutters, are positioning themselves in staging areas around the projected impact area - from Jacksonville, Fla., to Houston - making preparations to conduct immediate post-hurricane search, rescue and humanitarian aid operations, waterway impact assessments and waterway reconsittution operations. All ocean-going commercial ships and Coast Guard regulated barges over 200 gross tons were ordered to leave port today if they were between mile marker 60…

WCI Supports Bill Passage

Waterways Council, Inc. (WCI) expressed its pleasure with the passage in the United States Senate of Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) legislation, S. 728, which authorizes critical U.S. Army Corps of Engineers waterways and natural resources programs. Seven lock and dam modernization projects on the Upper Mississippi and Illinois rivers, and Bayou Sorrel on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway will be authorized by this legislation. The strong vote in favor of the WRDA bill underscores a growing understanding of the importance of the Corps of Engineers Civil Works program and of the benefits of the inland waterways system and its role in keeping the U.S. economically strong and competitive.

Senate Passes Water Resources Development Act

The Senate passed the hallmark water resources legislation, commonly referred to as the WRDA bill, by a vote of 91 to 4. This legislation authorizes important U.S. Army Corps of Engineers waterways and natural resources programs, including seven lock and dam modernization projects on the Upper Mississippi River and Illinois Waterway, and the Bayou Sorrel and the Matagorda Bay re-route project on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. The passage of this bill by a majority of the Senate underscores the important work of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. And, the action reflects the benefits of the inland waterways system and its role in keeping the Nation economically competitive.

AIWW Outlook Brightens

(Photo: AIWA)

The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway Association is an advocacy organization for one of the nation’s longest water infrastructure projects stretching over 1,100 miles – the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW). Additionally, the AIWW offers a direct connection between three of the nation’s top 10 ports measured by cargo value that we commonly refer to as ‘exit ramps to the world.’ In our role as advocates for the maintenance of the AIWW, we are cautiously optimistic about the national discussion revolving around infrastructure investment in the coming year…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

Subscribe
Maritime Reporter E-News subscription

Maritime Reporter E-News is the subsea industry's largest circulation and most authoritative ENews Service, delivered to your Email three times per week

Subscribe for Maritime Reporter E-News