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Friday, February 23, 2018

Lighthouse Service News

This Day in Coast Guard History – Dec. 18

1912-The premier issue of The Lighthouse Service Bulletin (January, 1912), described an incident on board the lighthouse tender Amaranth in connection with a Pintsch gas buoy. According to the documentation: “On the morning of the 18th of December [1910], at the Detroit lighthouse depot, eleventh district, during a pressure test of the B III type Pintsch gas buoy, the buoy blew up, and John A. Dunbar, machinist attached to the tender Amaranth, was killed. The test was made with Pintsch gas at a pressure of 18 atmospheres (approx. 270 pounds), and the buoy exploded as Mr. Dunbar closed the valve, the compressor having been shut down about five minutes before the accident. The top of the buoy separated from the barrel portion of the buoy at or near the weld, taking the cage work with it.

Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell Arrives in Miami

Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell. Photo: USCG

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell, the fifth of the service's planned 58 Fast Response Cutters in the Sentinel Class and the first of its class to be named after a female Coast Guard heroine, arrived at her homeport Coast Guard Sector Miami, Fla., Sunday. Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell is scheduled for commissioning in New Orleans on June 1, 2013. The location of the commissioning honors the history of the cutter’s namesake. This vessel is named after Coast Guard heroine Margaret Norvell who served admirably for 41 years with the U.S.

This Day in Coast Guard History – July 23

1836- Seminole Indians attacked and burned the Cape Florida lighthouse during the Second Seminole War. 1947- Congress approved Public Law 219 which provided for the integration of the personnel of the former Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation into the regular military organization of the Coast Guard.  This was effected during Fiscal Year 1948, "and the Service thus had a single unified organization to carry forward the correlated duty which prior to 1939 were divided among three different Federal agencies the Coast Guard, Lighthouse Service, and Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation." (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

Top of Lighthouse Delivered by USCG

The cupola of the Ship Island Lighthouse was delivered and placed on the top of the lighthouse this morning by a helicopter from USCG Air Station New Orleans. The 900 lbs. copula was placed on the newly reconstructed lighthouse. The friends of the National Seashore Foundation, National Park Service and the Naval Seabee's are coordinating the project. Over the last six months, USCG Station Gulfport and Aids to Navigation Team Gulfport assisted in the delivery of supplies and personnel to the island for the project. There has been a lighthouse on Ship Island, Miss. since 1850's. At that time a predecessor of the modern Day Coast Guard, the U.S. Lighthouse Service, manned it. The lighthouse stood at the spot until is was accidentally burned down in 1971.

This Day in Coast Guard History – June 30

1932-The Steamboat Inspection Service and Bureau of Navigation were combined to form the Bureau of Navigation and Steamboat Inspection (47 Stat. L., 415). The new agency remained under the control of the Commerce Department. 1933-The airways division, which had been conducted as a division of the Lighthouse Service, but under the administrative supervision of the Assistant Secretary for Aeronautics, Department of Commerce, was separated from the Lighthouse Service. (USLHS AR 1933, p. 97). 1939-"At the end of the year, the total number of lighthouse tenders was 65, of which 64 were in commission and ‘.1 was out of commission and advertised for sale. Of the vessels in commission, 42 were steam-propelled, 18 had diesel engines, and 4 had diesel-electric drive.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - June 30

1932-The Steamboat Inspection Service and Bureau of Navigation were combined to form the Bureau of Navigation and Steamboat Inspection (47 Stat. L., 415). The new agency remained under the control of the Commerce Department. 1933-The airways division, which had been conducted as a division of the Lighthouse Service, but under the administrative supervision of the Assistant Secretary for Aeronautics, Department of Commerce, was separated from the Lighthouse Service. (USLHS AR 1933, p. 97). 1939-"At the end of the year, the total number of lighthouse tenders was 65, of which 64 were in commission and ‘.1 was out of commission and advertised for sale. Of the vessels in commission, 42 were steam-propelled, 18 had diesel engines, and 4 had diesel-electric drive.

This Day in Coast Guard History – June 17

1832- The practice of utilizing "surplus" naval officers as officers of the Revenue Marine was discontinued. Revenue officer vacancies were henceforth filled by promotion from within the service. 1910-An Act of Congress (36 Stat. L., 534) abolished the Lighthouse Board and created the Bureau of Lighthouses to have complete charge of the Lighthouse Service. This law constituted the organic act under which the Lighthouse Service operated thereafter. 1942-Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Fleet ordered the organization of coastal pickets to combat submarine menace of Atlantic Coast. 1983- National Narcotics Border Interdiction System (NNBIS) began operations under the direction of Vice President George Bush and the executive board consisting of Secretaries of State…

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - February 14

1903- An Act of Congress (31 Stat. L., 825, 826, 827) that created the Department of Commerce and Labor provided for the transfer of the Lighthouse Service and the Steamboat Inspection Service from the Treasury Department. This allowed the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to succeed to the authority vested in the Secretary of the Treasury under the existing legislation.   (Source: Navy News Service)

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – December 28

1835-The "Dade Battle" occurred when Seminole Indians ambushed and killed Major Francis Langhorne Dade and his Army command while they were on the march on Fort King Road from Fort Brooke to reinforce the troops at Fort King (Ocala). This battle was the immediate cause of the Second Seminole War, a war in which the Revenue Cutter Service played an important role. 1857-The light was first illuminated in the Cape Flattery Lighthouse, located on Tatoosh Island at the entrance to the Straits of Juan de Fuca, Washington. "Because of Indian trouble it was necessary to build a blockhouse on Tatoosh Island before even commencing the construction of the lighthouse. 1903-An Executive Order extended the jurisdiction of the Lighthouse Service to the non-contiguous territory of the Hawaiian Islands.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Dec. 28

1835-The "Dade Battle" occurred when Seminole Indians ambushed and killed Major Francis Langhorne Dade and his Army command while they were on the march on Fort King Road from Fort Brooke to reinforce the troops at Fort King (Ocala). This battle was the immediate cause of the Second Seminole War, a war in which the Revenue Cutter Service played an important role. 1857-The light was first illuminated in the Cape Flattery Lighthouse, located on Tatoosh Island at the entrance to the Straits of Juan de Fuca, Washington. "Because of Indian trouble it was necessary to build a blockhouse on Tatoosh Island before even commencing the construction of the lighthouse. 1903-An Executive Order extended the jurisdiction of the Lighthouse Service to the non-contiguous territory of the Hawaiian Islands.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Feb. 1

1871- Using his administrative authority Secretary of the Treasury George S. Boutwell re-established a Revenue Marine Bureau within the Department and assigned Sumner I. Kimball as the civilian Chief with the duty of administering both the revenue cutters, which were then under the control of the local Collectors, and the life-saving stations. 1942- Enlistees after this date were restricted to enlistment in the Coast Guard Reserve. This was done to prevent having too many regulars in the service at war’s end. 1944- Coast Guardsmen participated in the invasion of Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – February 1

1871- Using his administrative authority Secretary of the Treasury George S. Boutwell re-established a Revenue Marine Bureau within the Department and assigned Sumner I. Kimball as the civilian Chief with the duty of administering both the revenue cutters, which were then under the control of the local Collectors, and the life-saving stations. 1942- Enlistees after this date were restricted to enlistment in the Coast Guard Reserve. This was done to prevent having too many regulars in the service at war’s end. 1944- Coast Guardsmen participated in the invasion of Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – December 29

1897-Congress prohibited the killing of fur seals in the waters of the North Pacific Ocean. 1903-An Executive Order extended the jurisdiction of the Lighthouse Service to Guantanamo, Cuba. 1999- The 578-foot cargo vessel Violetta caught fire in the Houston ship channel.  Twenty-three of her crew were rescued.  The CGC Point Spencer spent several days fighting the fire on board the vessel. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - March 25

1911-  The Treasury Department directed the keepers of life-saving stations to keep a lookout through the beach patrol for stray buoys washed ashore, to secure such buoys when it could be done, and to report their discovery or action to the nearest representative of the Lighthouse Service. Source: USCG Historian's Office

This Day in Coast Guard History – Dec. 29

1897-Congress prohibited the killing of fur seals in the waters of the North Pacific Ocean. 1903-An Executive Order extended the jurisdiction of the Lighthouse Service to Guantanamo, Cuba. 1999- The 578-foot cargo vessel Violetta caught fire in the Houston ship channel.  Twenty-three of her crew were rescued.  The CGC Point Spencer spent several days fighting the fire on board the vessel. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

This Day in Coast Guard History – March 25

1911-  The Treasury Department directed the keepers of life-saving stations to keep a lookout through the beach patrol for stray buoys washed ashore, to secure such buoys when it could be done, and to report their discovery or action to the nearest representative of the Lighthouse Service. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

This Day in Coast Guard History – August 31

1819-The cutters Alabama and Louisiana captured the privateer Bravo in the Gulf of Mexico.  The Bravo's master, Jean Le Farges -- a lieutenant of Jean Lafitte -- was later hanged from the Louisiana's yardarm.  The cutters then sailed for Patterson's Town on Breton Island to destroy the notorious pirates' den there. 1852-The Lighthouse Board was created and charged with administering the Lighthouse Service, as the Revenue Cutter Service was again decentralized.  The board was comprised of Army and Navy officers, and civilian scientists.  Channel marking and light operation acquired scientific precision and engineering.  Classical lenses and lateral buoy systems were introduced.  (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)

Miller to Christen New Cutter at Marinette Marine

Marinette Marine Corporation, a division of Manitowoc Marine Group, is scheduled to launch the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Hollyhock (WLB-214) on Saturday, January 25, at its shipyard located on the Menominee River in Marinette, Wis. Class seagoing buoy tenders being built by Marinette Marine Corporation. navigation. response, and domestic ice-breaking duties. Time. The Honorable Candice Miller, U.S. sophisticated vessel. spectacular side launch of the vessel into the Menominee River. The USCGC Hollyhock is a 225-ft. from Port Huron, Michigan, under the command of Lt. Michael McBrady. Pacific Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico. distinguished buoy tender. Guard cutter that served the United States from 1937 through 1982. City, Mich., on March 25, 1937. fleet serving the U.S.

USCG Celebrates 209th Anniversary

Originally formed as the Revenue Cutter Service in 1790, the USCG, which celebrated its 209th year anniversary in August, has grown to include other federal agencies including the U.S. Life-saving Service in 1915, the U.S. Lighthouse Service in 1939 and the Bureau of Navigation and Steamboat Inspection Service in 1942. As a result, the missions of the modern-day USCG include safety of life at sea, maritime law enforcement, marine environmental protection, waterways management, and national defense. Therefore, the USCG is truly a multi-missioned maritime service. Recently, the USCG was authorized a battle streamer for the Maritime Defense of the New Republic.

This Day in U.S. Naval History - February 14

  1778 - John Paul Jones in Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by European country, at Quiberon, France.   1813 - Essex becomes first U.S. warship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean   1814 - USS Constitution captures British Lovely Ann and Pictou 1903- An Act of Congress (31 Stat. L., 825, 826, 827) that created the Department of Commerce and Labor provided for the transfer of the Lighthouse Service and the Steamboat Inspection Service from the Treasury Department. This allowed the Secretary of Commerce and Labor to succeed to the authority vested in the Secretary of the Treasury under the existing legislation.   1840 - Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice   (Source: Navy News Service)

USCG Welcomes Cutter Margaret Norvell

Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell is named after lighthouse keeper Margaret Norvell who served with the U.S. Lighthouse Service for more than 41 years. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

She was a leader. She was a trailblazer. She was a lifesaver. She’s the namesake of the Coast Guard’s newest cutter – Margaret “Madge” Norvell. The Coast Guard welcomed their newest fast response cutter to the fleet this weekend as Coast Guard Cutter Margaret Norvell was commissioned in Miami. The cutter is the first in its class to be named after a Coast Guard heroine. Norvell, a member of the U.S. Lighthouse Service, first served at the Head of Passes Light as an assistant keeper from 1891 to 1896.

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - March 1

1876- Nuova Ottavia, an Italian vessel, grounded near the Jones Hill North Carolina Life-Saving Station. The rescue attempt by the crew of that station resulted in the loss of seven surfmen, the first deaths in the line of duty since the service began using paid crews in 1870. Among the dead was African-American Surfman Jeremiah Munden, the first African-American surfman to die in the line of duty. 1902- The first regular light stations in Alaska were established at Southeast Five Finger Island and at Sentinel Island. Both were on the main inside passage between Wrangell Strait and Skagway. 1927- The U.S. Lighthouse Service put into effect a system of broadcasting radio weather reports by four lightships stationed along the Pacific Coast.

This Day in Coast Guard History – Mar. 1

1876- Nuova Ottavia, an Italian vessel, grounded near the Jones Hill North Carolina Life-Saving Station. The rescue attempt by the crew of that station resulted in the loss of seven surfmen, the first deaths in the line of duty since the service began using paid crews in 1870. Among the dead was African-American Surfman Lewis White. 1902- The first regular light stations in Alaska were established at Southeast Five Finger Island and at Sentinel Island. Both were on the main inside passage between Wrangell Strait and Skagway. 1927- The U.S. Lighthouse Service put into effect a system of broadcasting radio weather reports by four lightships stationed along the Pacific Coast.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Feb 2018 - Cruise Ship Annual

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